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ANNUAL REPORT 



Maryland Ro^n- 
^a*aisv<wsity of Ni-rylu.'^ <. 
Colleire Park. MA 

U^♦I^ER^IlY OF IVIA:,YLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MO. 



00 mi ciRGOLm 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/report00mary_80 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1952 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— JUNE 1952 

Name Address Name Address 

TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres. ... Cumberland MRS. CURTIS WALKER Chevy Chase 

WENDELL D. ALLEN, Vice-pres. .. Baltimore RICHARD W. CASE Baltimore 

JEROME FRAMPTOM, Jr Federalsburg DWIGHT O. W. HOLMES Baltimore 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 

OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 

State Superintendent of Schools Administrative Assistant I 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. RUTH E. HOBBS 

T ^^PVtA^^^°''^^'°"^^ Education Telephone Operator I 

JOHN J. SEIDEL MRS. WILDA R. TAYLOR 

Ass't State Supt. in Finance and Research ... 

DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN ^^^^'^^^^'^.^frxTT. rr ^.-r.^^.^ ^ 

, MRS. ANNE K. CARROLL, I 

V^f^S'V^t^ c BArpr^^TAXT .-a J MRS. RHEABEL J. JAFFE, I 

MERLE S BATEMAN, Certification and MRS. MARY McCASKEY, II 

ta^^'q QmT^yxTAQ T f MARY ANNE MULVIE, II 

JAMh^b E. SFllZNAS, Instruction MRS. GENEVIEVE J. NEKERVIS, II 

Supervisors ^ ■ . i .-.i , 

ELIZABETH AMERY, Home Economics ^^^Vl^i"^ xrS^''J^ * rr ,r r^^r 

BRIAN M. BENSON, Finance MRS. VERDA K. McCLOW 

?Vt,?^^X^a ^^^A^^ofe^'T.?^^^^,^^^^^;" Principal Account Clerks 

MRS. GRACE A. DORSEY, Elementary MRS. GRACE STEELE TRAVERS, I 

r.^vT^?h !:> ITT ^7 o • , MINNIE GERBER, II 

S^nS^ Tc^Vx?^^^r.5?A xf^ Education MRS. MARY C. HOOVER, II 

R. CHRISTINE HOGAN, Research BLANCHE E KEEN II 

MRS. GLADYS T. HOPKINS, Curriculum ci.AiNv.nr. ivr.ii.iN, 

PAUL E. HUFFINGTON, Colored Schools Stenographer-Secretaries 

DWIGHT P. JACOBUS, Educational Services MARGARET E. ALBAUGH 

to Industries E. DRUSILLA CHAIRS 

HERSHEL M. JAMES, Industrial Education HELEN P. ELLIS 

HARRY M. Mcdonald, Agriculture ELSIE F. FORMAN 

EVELYN MILLER, Home Economics CARRYE HAMBURGER 

JAMES L. REID, School Plant MRS. HELEN C. KATENKAMP ^ . 

DOROTHY SHIRES, Elementary Schools ELIZABETH McGINNITY y/f J 

HERBERT R. STEINER, Physical Educa- e • o. u y(J^2^'<^^^ ^ 

tion and Recreation A'rT^l^"^?''^?^'"'^ ^ 

ELEANOR G. WEAGLY, School Lunch Pro- ^^VeRLyI. BENNETT / ' 

. ^ . MARGARET C. BROOKS ^ 

Assistant Supervisors LILLIAN O ERPENSTEIN / A~ J? 

LEE W. ADKINS, Veterans On-the-Farm Pro- MRS. MARILYN W FRANK ^ 

K^am NANCY HINER J) / -^7 

^KSfeSlTV^'?,^"'^ u MRS. ANNA kIlNER J A 

Swy^WcAn ^^nxT^^SS^V I^^T'^^-. MARTHA SAPPINGTON y^jTZ/fe 

SSA5J^l^^.Pv^o^i^?^'2r^.!>T^" ^^^"^?''^^*'"'' MRS. BETTY JEAN WAGGONEtC ' ^ 

^^^^^^r^^S'^^^J^l^^' MRS. HAZEL B. WILKERSON ^ 

HELEN D. GEORGE, Editor of Publications DOROTHY F YOT^VC 

WILLIAM F. KLINGAMAN, Accreditation ^■ 

GEORGE MYERS, School Lunch Program Report Typists 

M. ELEANOR RICE, Certification *DOLORES KOFSKY 

ETHEL M. SAMMIS, Physical Education *MRS. LOUISE LINDBERG 

and Recreation Spnior Tvnists 

gifSSS^ w^^pp'^T'^^i^.'^??^ MRS.'^CORINNE COMBS 

HELEN L. WIDMYER, Accreditation MRS. VIRGINIA C. COOPER 

Counselor MARGARET PATON 

FRANK H. NACHMAN, Veterans On-the- o • i 

Tnh Prn<rram Senior Clerks 

JOD urogram GERTRUDE GORRELL 

^r^^H^^^^TTx'^l:^'^^^?^^ MARGARET JACOBS 

*F. J. THUMAN MRS. DORIS VAN CLEAF 

^T; HOFMANN CLIFT "^TlORENCE M. BRADY 

Duplicating Machine Operator, II 
LLOYD E. HOLMES 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 

Medical Consultant 



Director 

R. C. THOMPSON 

Supervisors 

LIONEL BURGESS, Case Services 
GEORGE W. KELLER, Ass't, Services for 
the Blind 

W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Guidance, 
Placement and Training 

Counselor 

MYRTLE E. CHELL, Tuberculosis Cases 



* Part time. 

t On military leave. 



*DEAN W. ROBERTS, M.D. 

2612 North Charles Street, Baltimore-18 
Stenographer-Secretary 

KATHLEEN E. SCHEVE 
Principal Stenographers 

ANNE NUSINOV 

CHARLOTTE A. SYLVESTER 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. IRMA N. REFFES 



Baltimore Branch 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore- 1 



Branch Offices, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Western Maryland Branch 
170 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 



District Supervisor 

THOMAS D. BRAUN 



District Supervisor 

KENNETH G. STONER 



Rehabilitation CounselorB 

ERNEST C. ALLNUTT, Jr. 

FOY L. LUNSFORD 

IRWIN D. MEDINGER 

WILLIAM B. MELVILLE 

RUTH F. RING 

H. SMITH SHUMWAY 

JAMES D. SMYTH 

MRS. ELIZABETH B. SWiSHER 

Stenographer-Secretary 
EMMA E. LUECKERT 

Senior Stenographers 

MRS. MILDRED E. CARPENTER 
BERNADETTE C. MENINGER 
FRANCES PUSEY 
CLAIRE E. SCULLY 

Receptionist-Clerk 

MRS. OLIVE MAYO 

Central Maryland Branch 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore- 1 

District Supervisor 

W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Acting 

Rehabilitation Counselors 
B. W. BARKER 
THOMAS N. HAASE 
MARTHA R. HARRISON 

Senior Stenographers 

BEVERLY J. SHEAIN 
BELL M. SKLAR 



Rehabilitation Counselors 
*J. LEO DELANEY 
tWILLIAM C. HILL 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. ALFREDA E. COFFMAN 

Eastern Shore Branch 

109 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

District Supervisor 

RAYMOND H. SIMMONS 

Rehabilitation Counselors 
tFRANK A. TARBUTTON 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. GLADYS G. LEONARD 

Southern Maryland Branch 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

District Supervisor 
MERL D. MYERS 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
HENRY D. DEVLIN 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. JANE J. HOFFMAN 



* At 108 Washington Street, Cumberland 
t At 715 East Church Street, Frederick 
+ At Board of Education, Chestertown 



Director 

HELEN M. 



CLARK 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore-1 

Stenographer-Secretary 



Supervisors 

MAE GRAHAM, School and Children's Li- 
braries 

NETTIE B. TAYLOR, County and Institu- 
tional Libraries 

Counselors 

MRS. ELIZABETH McALLESTER, Tech- 
nical 

ANNE E. STURTEVANT, Readers' 

Librarians 

M. E. NAOMI JOHNSON, Associate 
JOSEPHINE M. BALDWIN, Senior Ass't 
MRS. SUZANNE V. PEARCE, Assistant 



MRS. LAURA M. GAITHER 

Senior Stenographer 

MARTHA J. KEYDASH 

Library Assistant 

MRS. BEVERLY BURMEISTER 

Senior Typist 

MRS. JOYCE REECE 

Junior Typist 

REGINA HERRMANN 

Porter 

LOUIS EDWIN MYERS 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 



County Librarian 
ALLEGANY— 

Cumberland Free Public Library 

MARY G. WALSH 
Westernport Public Library 

MRS. ELIZABETH THOMAS 

ANNE ARUNDEL— 

Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Li- 
brary, Annapolis ESTHER KING 



County 

BALTIMORE CITY— 



Librarian 



Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore 1 

AMY WINSLOW 



BALTIMORE— 

Baltimore County Library, 30 Chesapeake 
Avenue, Towson 4 RICHARD MINNICH 



County Librarian 

CAROLINE— 

Federalsburg Community Library 

MRS. CAROLYN G. NOBLE 
Ridgely Commimity Library 

MRS. PAUL HOFFMAN 

CARROLL— 

Davis Library, Westminster 

MRS. HELEN REX SHROYER 

CECIL— 

Cecil County Library, Elkton 

MRS. DOROTHY W. JEFFERSON 
Cecilton Community Library 

MRS. ERNEST MANN 

CHARLES— 

Charles County Library, La Plata 

DORIS HOLMES 

DORCHESTER— 

Dorchester County Public Library, 

Cambridge MRS. MARGARET HENRY 
Hurlock Free Public Library 

HOPE S. BARBER 
Vienna Public Library MRS. ALAN WEBB 

FREDERICK— 

C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick 

JOSEPHINE ETCHISON 

Emmitsburg Public Library 

LOUISE SEBOLD 

GARRETT— 

Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, 
Oakland EDITH BROCK 

HARFORD— 

Harford County Library, Bel Air 

MRS. DOROTHY GLACKIN 
Havre de Grace Public Library 

MRS. ROSWELL POPLAR 

HOWARD— 

Howard County Library, Ellicott City 

MRS. LENNA BURGESS 

KENT— 

Chestertown Public Librarv 

CORNELIA DAVIS 



County Librarian 

MONTGOMERY— 

Montgomery County Department of Pub- 
lic Libraries, 214 Diamond Avenue, 
Gaithersburg GEORGE B. MORELAND 
Rockville Public Library 

MRS. ROSE C. MILLER 
Takoma Park Public Library 

MRS. RUTH B. PRATT 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— 

Prince George's County Memorial Li- 
brary, 4227 Gallatin Street, Hyattsville 

MRS. MARY KENAN HADLEY 
Greenbelt Public Library 

MRS. MARJORIE A. MUIR 

QUEEN ANNE'S— 

Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville 

MRS. FLORENCE LOWENBACH 

ST. MARY'S— 

St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 
Leonardtown ELOISE PICKRELL 

SOMERSET— 

Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield 

MRS. GLADYS DAUGHERTY 
Princess Anne Public Library 

MRS. J. RANDOLPH FIELD 

TALBOT— 

Talbot County Free Library, Easton 

SARAH COCKEY 

WASHINGTON— 

Washington County Free Library, 
Hagerstown 

MRS. MARY LOUISE HOLZAPFEL 
WICOMICO— 

Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury 

MRS. FRED HORSLEY, Jr. 

WORCESTER— 

Pocomoke City Public Library 

MRS. AMY BLAINE SCHOOLFIELD 
Snow Hill Public Library 

MARGIE GODFREY 



PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Towson WILLIAM E. HENRY Bowie 

LILLIAN C. COMPTON Frostburg MILES W. CONNOR . . Coppin, Baltimore-17 

J. D. BLACKWELL Salisbury 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

31 Light Street, Baltimore-2 



HOOPER S. MILES, State Treasurer, Chair- 
man 

J. MILLARD TAWES, State Comptroller 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., State Supt. of 
Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME, Supt. of Schools Mont- 
gomery County, Vice-chairman 

WILLIS H. WHITE, Principal, Baltimore 
County 



J. P. MANNION, Director 
THOMAS I. HAYES, Executive Secretary 
MINNIE HAMILTON, Administrative Assist- 
ant II 

HELEN M. KIRKMAN, Principal Clerk 
MRS. DOROTHY NEWTON, Accounting 

Machine Operator 
EMMA SIEGELIN, Senior Typist 
MRS. ANETA RICHARDSON, Senior Clerk 
ELIZABETH RYAN, Senior Clerk 



4 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS, DIRECTORS AND 
SUPERVISORS— JUNE 1952 



County Address 

ALLEGANY— Cumberland 

Superintendent 

CHARLES L. KOPP 

Assistant Superintendent 

RICHARD T. RIZER, High 

Director 

WILLIAM P. COOPER, Cafeterias 

Supervisors 

LEWYN C. DAVIS, Junior High 

JAXE E. BOTSFORD, Elementary 

MILDRED WILLISON, Elementary 

WINIFRED GREENE, Primary 

JULIUS D. LONNHOLM, Vocational and 

Adult Education 
JACK E. PLATT, Music 
*THEODORE P. FOOTE, Art 
RALPH E. KESSLER, Special Education 
MRS. GLADYS MILLER EATON, Cafe- 
terias 

JOSEPH T. DOWNEY, Buildings and 
Grounds 

ARTHUR G. RAMEY, Transportation 
HOMER S. HIGGINS, Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Superintendent 

DAVID S. JENKINS 

Supervisors 

HOWARD A. KINHART, Senior High 
RUTH V. DUDDERAR, Junior High 
MRS. DOROTHY S. KIRKLEY, Elementary 
MRS. VIRGINIA D. MOORE, Elementary 
LEVIAH DANIEL, Elementary 
SARAH V. JONES, Colored Elementary 
FRANK C. GUNDERLOY, Vocational 
DORIS CLEMENTS. Home Economics 
R. HAROLD McCANN, Buildings 
MORRIS W. RANNELS, Planning and 

Purchasing 
DENNIS TURNER, Maintenance 
MRS. ELEANOR B. WARING, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

BALTIMORE— Towson 

Superintendent 

EDWARD G. STAPLETON 

Assistant Superintendents 

J. A. SENSENBAUGH, Elementary 
JAMES B. O'TOOLE, Jr., High 

Director 

WILLIAM T. WILLIS, Jr., Maintenance 
and Purchasing 

Supervisors 

C. JAMES VELIE, Music 
OLIVE JOBES, Art 

HAROLD D. MARTIN, Physical Education 
and Health 

MARY E. KELLEHER, Home Economics 

RUTHETTA LIPPY, School Lunch 

L. KATHERYN DICE, Special Services 

THOMAS R. LAWRENCE, Music 

ANNA MEEKS, Guidance 

T. M. GREENE, Business Subjects and 

Adult Education 
JEAN C. SISK, High 
NORRIS A. KING, Junior High 
G. ALFRED HELWIG, High 
HELEN E. HALE, High 
JOSEPH HILLYARD, High 
STELLA HUTCHISON, High 
MRS. LOUELLA H. WOODWARD, High 
JENNIE E. JESSOP. Elementary 



" Part time in this position. 



County .Address 
MYRTLE S. ECKHARDT, Elementary 
CLOTILDE DRECHSLER. Elementary 
ANNA G. SHEPPARD, Elementary 
DOROTHY V. BRANDT, Elementary 
M. KATHERINE DOST, Elementary 
MRS. PAULINE HOBBS, Colored Elemen- 
tary 

*MINNIE H. WOOLFORD, Colored High 
ARTHUR A. DICK, Vocational 
EARL D. HEATH, Transportation 
HERMAN C. BURTON, Pupil Personne! 

CALVERT— Prince Frederick 

Superintendent 

HARRY R. HUGHES 

Supervisors 

CARMEN DELAPLANE, Elementary and 

High 

MRS. THELMA O. CORNISH, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
C. ELIZABETH REIG, Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE— Denton 

Superintendent 

W. STEWART FITZGERALD 

Supervisors 

FRED G. USILTON, Jr., High 
BEATRICE WILLIAMS, Elementary 
*MRS. LULA D. WARD, Colored Elementary 
and High 

JAMES H. CLOW, Jr., Pupil Personnel 

CARROLL — Westminster 

Superintendent 

SAMUEL M. JENNESS 

Supervisors 

JOHN F. WOODEN, Jr., High 
RUTH E. DeVORE, Elementary 
CHARLES E. RECK, Elementary 
*PHILIP S. ROYER, Music 
MRS. JOSEPHINE WEST, Home Econo- 
mics and Cafeterias 
*MAE E. PRINCE, Colored Elementary and 
High 

STUART WIDENER, Maintenance and 

Transportation 
MAYE E. GRIMES, Pupil Personnel 

CECIL— Elkton 

Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SARTORIUS 

Supervisors 

EDWIN B. FOCKLER, High 
OLIVE L. REYNOLDS, Elementary 
MRS. MILDRED L. SOWERS, Elementary 
-^RACHEL E. BOYD, Home Economics 
EDWIN H. BARNES, Pupil Personnel 

CHARLES— La Plata 

Superintendent 
T. C. MARTIN 

Supervisors 

HAROLD CHANDLER. High 
B. LUCILE BOWIE, Elementary 
JOSEPH C. PARKS, Colored Elementary 
MRS. GENEVIEVE S. BROWN, Colored 
High 

MRS. CECILIA E. FARRALL, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 

Superintendent 

W. THEODORE BOSTON 



County Address 

Supervisors 

ALBERT S. FARVER, High 
EVELYN E. JOHNSON, Elementary 
MRS. VIOLA J. COMEGYS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
JOHN T. COMER, Jr., Pupil Personnel 

FREDERICK— Frederick 

Superintendent 

EUGENE W. PRUITT 



Supervisors 

DUVAL W. SWEADNER, High 
MRS. LOUISE F. THOMPSON, Elementary 
A. DRUCILLA WORTHINGTON, Elemen- 
tary 

WARREN R. EVANS, Physical Education 
and Health 
*CHARLES C. T. STULL, Music 
*CHARLES E. HENSON, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
RUTH MacVEAN, School Lunch 
PAUL HOFFMASTER, Transportation 
LEWIS B. EADER, Maintenance 
GERTRUDE SMITH, Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT— Oakland 

Superintendent 

R. BOWEN HARDESTY 

Supervisors 

FOSTER D. BITTLE, High 

JOHN M. DUNN, High 

H. ELIZABETH SLATER, Elementary 

MRS. CAROLINE WILSON, Elementary 

OREN T. GRASER, Maintenance 

JOHN L. FITZWATER, Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD— Bel Air 

Superintendent 

CHARLES W. WILLIS 

Assistant Superintendent 

BENJAMIN S. CARROLL 

Supervisors 

DOROTHY A. MUDD, High 

CLARK JONES, High 

HAZEL L. FISHER, Elementary 

MRS. ANNE M. NOONAN, Elementary 

JOHN J. FISHER, Pupil Personnel 

HOWARD— EUicott City 

Superintendent 

JOHN E. YINGLING 

Supervisors 

MARY L. ROCKWELL, High 
WILHELMINA OLDFIELD, Elementary 
MORRIS L. WOODSON, Colored Elementary 
and High 

FRANK B. DURIGG, Transportation and 

Maintenance 
HARRY T. MURPHY, Pupil Personnel 

KENT— Chestertown 
Superintendent 

READE W. CORR 



Supervisors 

CAREY E. LACEY, High 
LOUISE HEPBRON, Elementary 
*MRS. SARA B. CHAMBERS, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. MADELEINE FENNELL, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 



* Part time in this position. 

6 



County Address 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 

Superintendent 

EDWIN W. BROOME 

Assistant Superintendents 

RICHARD E. CARPENTER 
THOMAS W. PYLE 
JAMES L. PRINCE 

Directors 

WILLIAM B. MARKS, Transportation 
ELEANOR L. SMITH, Personnel and Statis- 
tics 

K. P. GRABARKIEWICZ, Maintenance 
GEORGE W. BARCEL, Custodial Services 

Supervisors 

MRS. FERN D. SCHNEIDER, High 
MRS. HELEN P. BREADY, High 
HAROLD R. PACKARD, High 
MAXWELL E. BURDETTE, High 
HANNAH F. HANWAY, Elementary 
ETHELEEN DANIEL, Elementary 
LILLIAN L. GORE, Elementary 
MARY L. GRAU, Elementary 
MRS. RUTH S. GUE, Elementary 
MAGDALEN EICHERT, Elementary 
CLARA G. STRATEMEYER, Elementary 
ALICE L. ROBINSON, Libraries 
MARJORIE BILLOWS, Art 
CRESENT J. BRIDE, Physical Education 
WILLIAM C. FEDDEMAN, Special Educa- 
tion 

JULIA W. WATKINS, Home Economics and 

MRS. CORELLI A. DAVID, School Lunch 
C. MABLE SMITH, Curriculum 
MRS. LOUISE S. WALKER, Visual Aids 
*MRS. MARGARET T. JONES, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

T. H. OWEN KNIGHT, Pupil Personnel 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 

Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SCHMIDT 

Assistant Superintendents 

THOMAS S. GWYNN, Jr., School Planning 
GEORGE H. ROBINSON, Personnel 

Director 

ROWANETTA S. ALLEN, Curriculum 

Supervisors 

LUCILE L. LURRY, High 
DEAN MANIFOLD, High 
EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Elementary 
A. MILDRED HOYLE, Elementary 
MRS. CATHERINE T. REED, Elementary 
MRS. MARY B. WACKWITZ, Art 
MRS. MARY J. A. CAREY, Music 
ANGELA C. WEIXEL, Music 
MARY A. THOMPSON, Health Education 
VINCENT C. HOLOCHWOST, Physical 
Education 

ADA M. WARRINGTON, Physical Educa- 
tion 

EMMA BOWMAN, Elementary 
ELMER K. ZELLER, Industrial 
M. GLADYS DICKERSON, Home Econo- 
mics and Adult Education 
FLORA SCHROYER, Cafeterias 
DOSWELL E. BROOKS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

WILLIAM W. HALL, Assistant in Colored 
Schools 

JOHN W. HEIM, Transportation 
ARTHUR E. ROBINSON, Maintenance 
MARIAN E. LOBDELL, Pupil Personnel 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 
Superintendent 

FRANKLIN D. DAY 



County Address 

Supervisors 

CARTER M. HICKMAN, High 
MRS. MARGARET S. STACK, Elementary 
MRS. LOLA P. BROWN, Colored Elementary 
and Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S— Leonardtown 

Superintendent 

LETTIE M. DENT 



Supervisors 

THOMAS L. SMITH, High 
E. VIOLETTE YOUNG, Elementary 
*MRS. MARGARET H. BURCH, Home Eco- 
nomics and School Lunch 
RALPH S. WATERS, Colored Elementary 
HARRIET H. REEDER, Pupil Personnel 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 

Superintendent 

C. ALLAN CARLSON 

Supervisors 

JOHN L. BOND, High 

MRS. ALICE MAE BEAUCHAMP, Ele- 
mentary 

KERMIT COTTMAN, Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES O. BURNS, Jr., Pupil Personnel 
TALBOT— Easton 

Superintendent 

J. WILLARD DAVIS 

Supervisors 

ARTHUR R. HIGGINBOTTOM, High 
M. LILLIAN CHEEZUM, Elementary 
♦KATHLEEN A. FRANCIS, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
MRS. VIRGINIA DARROW, Pupil Personnel 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM M. BRISH 



* Part time in this position. 



County Address 

Assistant Superintendent 
WILLIAM C. DIEHL 

Supervisors 

C. PAUL BARNHART, High 
WILBUR S. HOOPENGARDNER, Junior 
High 

F. PAULINE BLACKFORD, Elementary 
KATHERINE L. HEALY, Elementary 
ANNE H. RICHARDSON, Elementary 
MIRIAM L. HOFFMAN, Music 
ALFRED ROTH, Industrial Arts 
CATHERINE L. BEACHLEY, Guidance 
MRS. ANORMALLEE WAY, Home Econo- 

mics and School Lunch 
MARY E. BYER, Health and Library Curri- 
culum 

RUSSELL KEPLER, Maintenance 
RICHARD MARTIN, Transportation 
JOSEPH H. VANCE, Finance 
WILBUR M. PHILLIPS, Pupil Personnel 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 

Superintendent 

JAMES M. BENNETT 

Supervisors 

LESTER A. HALL, High 
LOUISE MITCHELL, Elementary 
MARTHA R. JONES, Elementary 
MARIE A. DASHIELL, Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES E. TILGHMAN, Pupil Personnel 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 

Superintendent 

PAUL D. COOPER 

Supervisors 

ROBERT H. ERASER, Elementary and 
High 

PAUL S. HYDE, Elementary and High 
MRS. ANNIE B. DOWNING, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. LUCY S. PILCHARD, Pupil Personnel 



7 



CONTENTS 

Page 



Letter of Transmittal 9 

Legislation Affecting Education 10 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 11 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Instruction 19 

Vocational Education 29 

Certification and Accreditation 35 

Library Extension 39 

Vocational Rehabihtation 45 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 49 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of PubHc and Nonpubhc Schools 50 

Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools 51 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools for Atypical Children 55 

Births in Maryland 58 

Per Cent and Index of Attendance 60 

Grade Enrollment, Nonpromotions in Elementarj^ Schools 63 

Age-Grade Study 69 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 73 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 80 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 96 

Teachers by Subject 102 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 103 

Clerks in Schools; Janitors, Utility Men, etc 104 

Parent-Teacher Associations 105 

Teachers: by Certification, Sex, Summer School Attendance, Resignations, 

Turnover, Source 106 

Number Pupils Belonging, Average Salary per Teacher 123 

Number and Size of Schools 128 

Adult Education; Baltimore City Summer Schools 134 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland 137 

Vocational Rehabilitation 138 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 140 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 144 

Cost per Pupil 146 

Salaries 152 

Vocational Program, Adult Education 154 

Transportation 158 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 163 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 167 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 174 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 175 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 176 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 184 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 185 

State and County Health Program for School Children 188 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 191 

Index 236 



8 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1953 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin: 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the eighty-sixth 
''annual report covering all operations of the State department of 
education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of edu- 
cation throughout the State" for the period beginning July 1, 1951 
and ending June 30, 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



9 



10 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Regular Session — January, 1952 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 2, House Bill 340 of the Laws of 1952 repeals and re-enacts, with 
amendments, Subsection (4b) of Section 99 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code 
of Maryland (1947 Supplement), relating to payments to teachers retired on dis- 
ability. The law, as re-enacted, makes possible a retirement allowance of up to 
one-seventieth of the average final compensation multiplied by the number 
of years of creditable service instead of ninety per centum of one-seventieth of 
such factors as provided for in the previous law. 

Chapter 3, House Bill 341 of the Laws of 1952 repeals and re-enacts, with 
amendments, Subsection (4) of Section 97 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1939 Edition) subtitle "Teachers' Retirement System." The law, as 
re-enacted, permits any person who is eligible for membership in the Maryland 
State Teachers' Retirement System and who did not elect to become a member 
within one year of the establishment of the system to join the system and receive 
pension credit, provided such person elects to become a member between July 1, 
1951, and December 31, 1951. 

Chapter 4, House Bill 342 of the Laws of 1952, adds a new subsection to Sec- 
tion 102 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1939 Edition), relating 
to the Teachers' Retirement System. The new subsection provides for supple- 
mental payments to teachers who are already retired and also to those who will 
in the future retire under the provisions of Article 77. 

Chapter 64, House Bill 110 of the Laws of 1952 adds a new Section to Article 77 
of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition). This new Section gives to 
certain teachers who did not elect to become members of the Teachers' Retirement 
System a temporary right to make such an election provided that any such teacher 
shall pay to the retirement system the full amount of what would have been his 
accumulated contributions had he belonged to the system from the time he was 
first eligible to become a member to the time of making membership application, 
together with regular interest. 

Authorization for Appointment of Green Commission 

Senate Joint Resolution 1, of the Laws of 1952, requests the Governor of Mary- 
land, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Delegates 
to appoint jointly a commission to study and re-evaluate the public school system 
of this State, this commission to include in its study such topics as curriculum, 
physical facilities, administration, salaries, and the proper division of responsibility 
as to the administration and financing of the public schools between the State and 
the several political subdivisions. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



11 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

August 28, 1951 

The Board approved tentative standards governing special 
programs for mentally retarded children. These standards will 
serve as a guide to the State and county superintendents in ad- 
ministering the new law on special education programs. ((This 
law, passed by the 1951 General Assembly, amends Section 229 of 
Article 77 (1939 Edition) as amended by Chapter 76 of the Acts of 
1950, to provide $600 from State funds for the appropriate instruction 
of physically and or mentally handicapped children in approved 
educational institutions if no provision for the instruction of such 
children has been made by the local board of education.) ) 

The Board approved holding one or two one-day meetings a 
year for the members of the Department and of the local boards of 
education. The programs of the meetings will be devoted to mat- 
ters of general concern, and outstanding people will be brought in to 
participate. 

Dr. Pullen reported to the Board on the teacher-salary and 
teacher-supply problem as presented to the Legislative Council on 
June 13, 195 i. A copy of his report to the Council had been for- 
warded to the members of the Board. A subcommittee of the 
Legislature Council, appointed to study the matter further, held 
meetings in several parts of the State to which school superinten- 
dents, teachers, county commissioners, interested citizens and mem- 
bers of parent-teacher associations, boards of education, and the 
General Assembly were invited. On August 11, 1951, Dr. Pullen 
appeared before the subcommittee to discuss further the following 
points on the teacher salary problem: 

1. Need for salary adjustments 

2. Teacher turnover and supply 

3. Cost of "across-the-board" raises of $300, $400, and $500 

4. Cost of raising the amount of the annual increment and of decreasing 
the number of increments 

The Board approved the following appointments: Mr. C. 
William Anthony, Assistant Supervisor of Research, effective August 
16, 1951; Mr. Herbert R. Steiner, Supervisor of Physical Education 
and Recreation, effective September 1, 1951, (position made vacant 
by the death of Dr. Thomas C. Ferguson); Miss Helen L. Widmyer, 
Assistant Supervisor of i^. ccreditation, effective September 1, 1951, 
(replaced Miss Dorothy W. Shires who has been appointed Super- 
visor of Pupil Personnel) . 

The Board approved the following salary schedule for the pro- 
fessional staffs of the State Teachers Colleges and recommended 
that it be put into effect as soon as funds can be made available, 
preferably at the beginning of the year 1951-52: 



12 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



Salary Schedule of Professional Staffs: State Teachers Colleges 

No. Steps 

Minimum Maximum Increment in Scale 

Bachelor's degree $3,500 $4,375 $175 5 

Master's degree 4,500 5,625 225 5 

Master's degree plus 30 hrs 5,000 6,500 250 6 

Doctor's degree 5,500 7,700 275 8 

Deans shall receive the basic salary plus $750. 

Directors of practice and any other directors recommended by the Presi- 
dents, the State Superintendent, and the State Board of Education shall 
receive the basic salary plus $500. 

Principals of the campus elementary schools shall receive the basic salary 
plus $500- 

The Presidents' salaries shall be: 

Bowie $10,000 

Coppin 10,000 

Frostburg 10,000 

Salisbury 10,000 

Towson 12,000 plus home 

November 27, 1951 

Mr. Wendell D. Allen was elected Vice-president of the State 
Board of Education to fill the vacancy caused by the recent death of 
Dr. Nicholas Orem. 

The Board passed the following resolution on the death of Dr. 
Orem. 

Resolution 

It is with sorrow that the State Board of Education records the death of its 
Vice-president, Dr. Nicholas Orem, which took place on Wednesdav, November 21, 
1951. 

A graduate of St. John's College in 1898, Dr. Orem became principal of a 
grammar school and then of a high school in his native Talbot County immediately 
following a year's voluntary military service in the Spanish- American War. 
While teaching, he did graduate work in education at Columbia and Johns Hop- 
kins Universities. 

In 1907 Dr. Orem was elected Superintendent of Schools in Talbot County 
and continued to act in this capacity until in 1921 he received a similar appoint- 
ment in Prince George's County. For more than two decades he had the primary 
responsibility for the development of the Prince George's County schools and be- 
came one of the outstanding educational leaders in the State. He was chairman 
or a member of many superintendents' committees which helped determine educa- 
tion policies throughout Maryland. 

Interest in the individual was characteristic of Dr. Orem. He was one of 
the first superintendents to set up classes for retarded children and was one of the 
pioneers in beginning a scientific study of causes of delinquency among children. 

In 1942 Dr. Orem retired from the superintendency in Prince George's County 
and the following year received the honor of an appointment to the State Board of 
Education. In 1948 he was elected its Vice-president. To the deliberations of the 
Board he brought informed opinion and ripe judgment and to the members of the 
Board he became a friend. 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the significant role Dr. Orem 
played in public education in Maryland during nearly half a century and to ex- 
tend to the members of his family sympathy in their bereavement. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



The Board authorized Dr. Pullen to issue permits to exchange 
teachers who are employed in Maryland county schools upon rec- 
ommendation of a recognized agency such as the International 
Education Programs Branch of the United States Office of Education. 
Such teachers are not eligible for teachers' certificates, for which 
United States citizenship is necessary. On a previous occasion the 
Board had agreed to permit exchange teachers to work in the public 
schools. 

Dr. Pullen presented to the Board copies of the budgets which 
have recently been submitted to the Budget Director. He called 
attention to the fact that subcommittees of the State Board had 
studied and approved the three main divisions of the budget, i. e. the 
public school fund, the teachers colleges, and the State Department 
of Education. 

The State Superintendent mentioned that occasional questions 
arise as to the responsibility of the State Board of Education and the 
State Superintendent of Schools in respect to legislation concerning 
public schools. He therefore called to the attention of the Board 
Sections 12, 23, and 25, of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland, 1939 Edition. 

Section 12 — The State Board of Education shall exercise, through the State 
Superintendent of Schools and his professional assistants, general 
control and supervision over the public schools and educational in- 
terest of the State; they shall consult with and advise, through their 
executive officer and his professional assistants, county boards of 
education, boards of district school trustees, county superintendents, 
supervisors, attendance officers, principals, teachers, and interested 
citizens, and shall seek in every way to direct and develop public 
sentiment in support of public education. 

Section 23 — The State Board of Education shall transmit biennially to the 
Governor, certified to by the State Superintendent of Schools, an annual 
State public school budget as determined by existing laws, including 
the appropriation for the State Department of Education, the mainte- 
nance of the State normal schools, the retired teachers' pensions, 
State-aid to approved high schools. State-aid to approved colored 
industrial schools, the part payment of the salaries of county super- 
intendents of schools, and of one supervisor and one attendance 
officer in the City of Baltimore, the free text book fund, materials 
of instruction and school supplies, and such other appropriations for 
special educational purposes as may from time to time be made by the 
General Assembly, and an estimate of the amount that will remain, 
after all deductions for special purposes and activities, for apportion- 
ment to the counties and the City of Baltimore. It shall also be the 
duty of the State Board of Education, on and with the advice of the 
State Superintendent of Schools, to prepare, from time to time, as it 
may be deemed wise, bills, and to recommend the same to the 
Governor and the General Assembly, providing for changes in the 
appropriation for special educational purposes and activities and in 
the total amount raised and contributed by the State for the en- 
couragement and support of pubUc education. 



14 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 

Section 25 — It shall be the duty of the State Board of Education to consider the 
educational needs of the State, and on and with the advice of the 
State Superintendent of Schools, to recommend to the Governor and 
to the General Assembly, such additional legislation, or changes in 
existing legislation, as may be deemed desirable. Such recommenda- 
tions shall be in the form of prepared bills and shall be laid before 
the Governor and the General Assembly. The State Board of Edu- 
cation and the State Superintendent of Schools shall be given a 
hearing on the same by the committees of the Senate and the House of 
Delegates, to which such bills are referred, if this is requested. 

Dr. Pullen announced that Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss had been ap- 
pointed to the position of Dean of the College of Education at the 
University of Maryland, effective January 1, 1952. Dr. Devilbiss, 
Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education, was formerly State 
Supervisor of High Schools. 

Dr. Pullen reported that the Southern Education Foundation 
has provided a travel fellowship for Mr. Paul E. Huffington, Super- 
visor of Colored Schools, to study Negro education in the South. 

The State Superintendent presented to the Board a summary of 
the 1950-51 operating expenses for State-owned automobiles operated 
by members of the State Department of Education. The figures 
indicate that the State has saved money by furnishing cars instead 
of paying mileage for privately-owned cars. 

The State Board of Education was advised that a meeting for 
members of the county boards of education was scheduled for 
December 4, 1951, at which time it was planned to discuss the duties 
of school board members, school buildings, and the Equalization 
fund. 

The State Board approved the request of the faculty of the 
State Teachers College at Frostburg to name the new Administration 
and Library Building in honor of Mr. Lloyd Lowndes, former 
Governor of Maryland, and Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes, President of 
the State Board of Education. 

Upon recommendation of the State Superintendent, the Board 
adopted the following principles for putting into operation the new 
faculty salary schedule for the State Teachers Colleges: 

1. A faculty member is defined as a person who is a member of the staff of a 
teachers college and whose salary is administered by the State Superinten- 
dent and the State Board of Education. 

2. In the column of the salary schedule designed "master's degree plus 30 
hours," the interpretation should be 30 hours' graduate credit in the field 
of education or in the field of specialization. Instructors who take addi- 
tional work to qualify for this classification while employed at the teachers 
colleges should choose courses in consultation with the approval of the dean 
of instruction and the president. In fields such as art and music some of the 
30 hours required to qualify for this scale may, with the approval of the 
president, be satisfied through the substitution of appropriate work of a 
type for which academic credit is not given. 







Maryland State Department of Education 15 

3. New members coming to the faculty will be placed on the scale according 
to their education and experience elsewhere. Placement on the master's 
degree plus 30 hours or doctor's degree scales shall be contingent upon 
at least five years of accredited professional experience. All new members 
coming to the faculty without five years of accredited professional experi- 
ence, regardless of the amount of graduate work beyond the master's degree, 
will be placed on the master's degree scale. The president of the college 
will be the final judge of the candidate's qualification for experience credit. 

4. Deans shall receive a salary differential of $750. Directors of practice and 
any other directors recommended by the president and approved by the 
State Superintendent and the State Board of Education shall receive a 
salary differential of $500. This same differential shall apply to the prin- 
cipal of the campus elementary school. 

5. Salaries shall not be supplemented by free maintenance or by reduction 
in the cost of board and lodging. All special duties shall be paid for on a 
basis approved by the State Superintendent and the State Board of Edu- 
cation. 

6. Where board and lodging are furnished by the college, a fixed sum of $50 
per month shall be paid to the college. 

7. Retirement allowance shall be paid on the basis of the cash salary received, 
except that where a house is furnished the president as a part of the annual 
remuneration a fair value of the rental shall constitute an addition to the 
salary for the purposes of retirement. 

March 12, 1952 

The following resolution was passed by the Board on the death 
of Dr. Albert S. Cook, former State Superintendent of Schools 
(1920-1942). 

Resolution 

It is with deep regret that the State Board of Education has learned of the 
death of Dr. Albert Samuel Cook, on March 10, 1952. 

Dr. Cook first gained national recognition through his achievements as 
Superintendent of Schools in Baltimore County. Interested in broad principles 
and with a profound conviction of the paramount role of education in a democracy, 
he directed every effort toward the improvement of classroom teaching. Better 
preparation of teachers, a salary scale which attracted and retained qualified 
teachers, county-wide supervision, in-service training of teachers, and preparation 
of courses of study quickly brought the county schools to a high level of efficiency. 
Many school systems adopted the Baltimore County course of study, and the 
schools themselves became the object of study and often of emulation. 

When in 1920, following the 1916 survey of the Maryland schools and the 
revision of the State school laws, the State Board of Education was looking for 
a superintendent to guide the development of the State school system, Dr. Cook, 
known to have imagination, insight, initiative, and unusual qualities of leadership, 
became a unanimous choice. 

On the framework recently provided by the Legislature, Dr. Cook at once 
introduced on a State-wide basis many of the school practices which had proved 
their value in Baltimore County. Qualifications of teachers, supervision of class- 
room work, and continuous revisions of courses of study became distinguishing 
characteristics of the Maryland State school system. 

Almost immediately, however. Dr. Cook realized that the poorer counties, 
sparsely settled and largely agricultural, could not pay for good schools without 
prohibitive taxes. He therefore proposed and, with the enthusiastic help of 
other school people and interested citizens, succeeded in having the Legislature 
pass an equalization law which enabled every county to provide a sound minimum 



16 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



education for its children, with only a reasonable expenditure of county funds 
and with supplements from the State Treasury. Under Dr. Cook, the Mary- 
land school system became known as one of the strongest in the country. 

Among the other significant changes which took place under his administra- 
tion, the minimum standard for the preparation of teachers rose from less than 
high school graduation to graduation from college, with specialized professional 
training. The institutions for the preparation of elementary school teachers, 
which had offered two-year courses based on high school graduation, became 
teachers colleges and have maintained unusually high standards. 

Dr. Cook through his professional activities, made a lasting impression upon 
the Maryland public schools. Through his dynamic and charming personality, 
he will live always in the lives of those who knew him. 

The Board wishes to express deep sympathy to the members of Dr. Cook's 
family. 

The Board unanimously re-elected Dr. Pullen as State Superin- 
tendent of Schools for a four-year term beginning June 1, 1952. Dr. 
Pullen had first been elected in 1942 to finish out the four-year term 
begun by Dr. Albert S. Cook. The Attorney General has ruled that 
Dr. Pullen's first term expired on June 1944, and his second full 
term will expire on June 1, 1952. 

The Board's attention was called to the State laws which require 
that minutes and regulations of the State Board of Education and 
publications of the State Department of Education be sent to certain 
State agencies. Copies of the minutes of the State Board of Educa- 
tion are sent to the Secretary of State and the Department of Legisla- 
tive Reference. Copies of all rules and regulations passed by the 
Board are sent to the Clerk of the Court of Appeals and the afore- 
mentioned State agencies. Copies of all publications of the De- 
partment, printed and otherwise, are required by legislative action 
of 1947 to be sent to the Hall of Records and the State Library. It 
was pointed out that the above policies give Maryland citizens an 
opportunity to become aware of the rules and regulations which may 
affect them. 

The State Superintendent reported next on the status of school 
legislation at the 1952 session of the Maryland General Assembly: 

Teachers' Salary Bills 

House Bill 610 (1951) provided for a $300 increase in the State minimum 
salary schedule for principals and teachers. It would have increased 
State aid by approximately $3,500,000, to be financed by a proposed in- 
crease of one per cent in the corporate income tax. This Bill was passed 
by the 1951 General Assembly and subsequently vetoed. At the 1952 session 
of the General Assembly the House overrode the veto, but the Senate sus- 
tained the veto. 

Senate Bill 7 (1952) increased the annual increment for principals 
and teachers on the State minimum salary schedule from $100 to $150 
and reduced from sixteen to twelve the number of steps required to meet 
the maximum salary, the effective date being July 1, 1953. This Bill 
was passed by both Houses, but was later vetoed. 

Senate Bill 48 (1952) provided for a $300 increase in the State minimum 
salary schedule for principals and teachers, effective July 1, 1953. The 
Bill was passed by both houses, but was later vetoed. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



Teachers' Retirement Bills 

House Bill 340 (1951) increased by one-ninth the payments to teachers 
retired on disability. Formerly such a teacher received a pension which, 
together with his annuity, amounted to ninety per cent of one-seventieth 
of his average final salary multiplied by the number of years of service. 
The present law strikes out the phrase "ninety per cent." Thus a teacher 
who has been receiving $90.00 per month as a disability pension, should 
now receive $100.00 per month. This Bill was passed by both Houses, 
but was later vetoed. At the 1952 session the General Assembly overrode 
the veto of this Bill. 

House Bill 342 (1951) provided for additional payments to retired teach- 
ers and to those who will retire in the future in the amounts shown in the 
following table: 

Retired Teachers Receiving Supplementary Payments 

Under $300.00 Increase to $600.00 

$300— $599.99 $300.00 

600— 749.99 Increase to $900.00 

750— 999.99 20 per cent 

1,000—1299.99 15 per cent 

1,300—1635.99 10 per cent 

1,636—1799.99 Increase to $1800.00 

This Bill was passed by both Houses, but was later vetoed. At the 1952 
session the General Assembly overrode the veto of this Bill. 

House Bill 341 (1951) permits a teacher who originally had the choice 
of electing to join or not to join the retirement system and who chose not 
to join, to become a member of the retirement system at any time. Before 
being admitted to membership, however, the teacher must pay into the 
system the full amount of what he would have contributed, with regular 
interest, from the time when he first becom^e eligible for membership up 
to the time of making application for membership in the retirement system. 

Subsequently the Attorney General ruled that teachers could not take 
advantage of the provisions of this Bill after December 31, 1951, the end 
of the six-months period mentioned in the Bill. 

House Bill 110 (1952) was introduced because of the Attorney General's 
ruling on the legality of House Bill 341 (1951). It permits a teacher who 
originally had the choice of joining or not joining the retirement system, 
and who chose not to join, to become a member of the system under the 
following conditions: 

1. A teacher who, as of June 1, 1952, has been continuously employed 
as a teacher since the time he was first eligible for membership in the 
system may now apply for membership. 

2. Application to join the .system must be made within one vear after 
July 1, 1952. 

3. Before being admitted to membership, the teacher must pay into the 
system the full amount of what he would have contributed with regu- 
lar interest, from the time when he first became eligible for mem- 
bership up to the time of applying for membership in the retirement 
system. 

This Bill was passed by both houses and was later signed by the Governor. 

The State Superintendent reported that the presidents of the 
State teachers colleges and he had conferred with State fiscal au- 
thorities regarding the salary schedule adopted by the Board for 
the professional staff at the State teachers colleges. The tentative 
allowance in the 1952 State budget provided a 15 per cent increase. 



18 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



Purchase of a new location for Coppin State Teachers College 
was announced. The college will move to 2500 West North Avenue, 
Baltimore, as soon as certain renovations and alterations have been 
made to the present property, formerly the Lutheran Deaconess 
Motherhouse. 

May 28, 1952 

Dr. PuUen called the attention of the Board to a recent opinion 
of the Attorney General indicating that Section 14A of Article 77 of 
the Annotated Code (1947 Supplement) applies to correspondence 
schools or courses. According to Section 14A every private school or 
educational institution, however designated, which charges tuition 
or fees for attendance, and which offers certain educational programs, 
must secure a certificate of approval issued by the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools, before it may begin or continue to operate or 
function in this State. Under this Section, the State Superintendent 
of Schools must pass on the educational standards and qualifications 
of the school before issuing his approval. 

Because of the need for qualified teachers the Board authorized 
the State Superintendent to issue War Emergency Certificates for the 
school year 1952-53. 

Dr. Pullen was authorized to study and report back to the 
Board on the advisability of microfilming the records of the State 
Department of Education. 

Dr. Pullen reported next on several studies which the Depart- 
ment is planning. One study will deal with the problem of teacher 
supply especially in the elementary schools. This study will con- 
sider the type of training desirable for elementary school teachers and 
the possibility of training elementary school teachers in institutions 
in the State which are not now working in this field. 

A second study will concern itself with the place and value of 
television in public education. It was pointed out that for several 
years Montgomery County has been conducting a television pro- 
gram. Recently the State Department, together with Baltimore 
City, Baltimore County and Anne Arundel County school au- 
thorities, has been putting on a half-hour program. Classes are 
televised in the classroom. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 
has also been conducting a television program every other week. 

The Board's attention was also called to a collection of pictures, 
slides, and scripts on Maryland Communities prepared by the 
children and teachers. It is planned to distribute this collection 
throughout the State so that children may learn about all sections of 
the State. The material will be purchased by school systems of 
other states. 

It was announced that the Department will undertake an ex- 
amination of itself, its functions, and possibly its reorganization. 

The State Superintendent called attention to a report covering 
procedure in adopting textbooks for the public schools of the State. 
He stated that a report on the teaching of history in the public 
schools of Maryland, prepared for a committee of the Maryland 
State Bar, will be sent to the Board. 



AIaryland State Department of Education 



19 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The services of the Division of Instruction for the school year 
1951-52 were related to three major areas of activity: (1) leadership 
training programs designed to increase the competency of county 
supervisors, principals, and teachers; (2) comprehensive study of 
children with special needs and changes in programs and facilities 
for such children; and (3) adaptation of programs of supervision in 
Maryland counties to needs arising from critical shortage in the 
supply of qualified teachers. 

Leadership Training Programs 

The supervisory staff of the Division of Instruction was con- 
cerned throughout the year with the continued development and 
improvement of the general education program. This program, 
aimed at the preparation of boys and girls, young men and women, 
for active citizenship in American society, poses problems which re- 
late to the ideals and basic values distinguishing community life and 
human relationships in this country, the form and operation of 
government, the responsibilities of registering and exercising the 
franchise, and the exercise of critical judgment in connection with 
the issues of our day. Since this is necessarily a program of educa- 
tion for all boys and girls, representative of wide differences in 
capacity and cultural background, it requires on the part of the 
teacher precise knowledge of these differences and ability to adapt 
the materials of instruction and learning activities accordingly. 

The general education program requires also that the teacher 
know the developmental tasks which are imposed on individual 
pupils by organic changes in their own bodies and by the expectancies 
of the various groups in which they should have active, constructive 
membership. Teachers must not only know democratic ideals and 
values, they must assure that pupils practice them in their own school 
activities. These views determined the content of the report which 
the Division prepared for the Joint Bar Citizenship Committee of the 
Maryland State Bar Association, the Bar Association of Baltimore 
City, and the Junior Bar Association of Baltimore City. They 
were supported also and elaborated in a second report prepared for 
the Governor's Commission to Study the Possibilities for Teaching 
a Course in State Government and Politics in the High Schools of 
this State. The report to the Governor's Commission documents 
the fact that every county provides for such teaching in both ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. In some counties this instruction 
is given in five of the twelve grades and in some counties in as many 
as nine grades. In addition, all counties participate in youth- 
government programs, either their own or those sponsored by the 
American Legion or the Y. M. C. A. Many schools have registration 
and election campaigns which in procedure and in significance to the 
school parallel those operating on national. State, and local levels. 

One aspect of the general education program which is rapidly 
increasing in importance is that devoted to education for home and 



20 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



family living. Many of the schools of the State have developed 
courses and materials related to this area of living. In the summer 
of 1951 two teams, each representing administration and the mutual 
interest of home economics and social studies in the program, at- 
tended on invitation the summer workshop in home and family living 
at Cornell University. One of these teams was drawn from the 
Lincoln Colored Senior-Junior High School at Frederick and the 
other from the Salisbury Colored Senior- Junior High School. Both 
teams returned to their schools to effect pilot programs during the 
year 1951-52. Representatives of these teams were included in the 
State committee on programs in home and family living. Included 
also on this committee were representatives of schools and counties 
where such programs were in progress or in prospect, as well as 
members of the State Department of Education. The State com- 
mittee met several times during the year, reviewed and evaluated 
programs in operation, and projected patterns of organization in 
which home economics courses involving both boys and girls were 
set in this larger context of home and family living and so were 
strategically placed to make use of the instructional services of 
teachers of social studies and English and others who might make 
distinctive contributions to this program. 

The child study program, which has established itself as the 
foundation of the total teacher education program, both pre-service 
and in-service, continued through its seventh year. A total of 444 
white teachers and 76 colored teachers participated in the first-year 
program; 270 white teachers and 68 colored teachers in the second- 
year program ; and 208 white teachers and 33 colored teachers in the 
third-year program. The total of 1,099 participants were 367 fewer 
than in the previous year. This confirmed the forecast of a leveling 
off in the program. Child study will probably establish itself as a 
continuing program, with the annual number of participants ranging 
from 803 to 1,000. The Division of Instruction has considered in a 
preliminary way with the Institute for Child Study at the University 
of Maryland the possibility of extending the child study program to 
include community study. Child study and community study 
could conceivably define the full scope of teacher education. Plans 
have been made to explore further the possibility of making this the 
major aspect of the in-service teacher education program and, con- 
sequently, the distinctive professional responsibility of supervision 
in the counties of Maryland. 

The Institute for Child Study at the University of Maryland 
provided consultants also for the in-service training of pupil per- 
sonnel workers in the counties and for leaders of parent education 
groups. The State Supervisor of Pupil Personnel arranged a five- 
day conference in September for all supervisors of pupil personnel 
and visiting teachers. Three days of the conference, which was held 
in the Board Room of the State Department of Education, were 
devoted to plans for extending and improving the parent education 
program. Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, Director of the Institute for 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



Child Study, and Dr. Katherine Whiteside-Taylor, Supervisor of 
Parent Education for the Baltimore City Department of Educa- 
tion, were consultants. Two days of the conference were devoted 
to a consideration of ways of holding the fifteen-year-old in school. 
Major attention was given to necessary adaptations in the curriculum 
for this age group. Dr. E. Preston Sharp of the State Department of 
Public Welfare explained the programs at the Maryland state train- 
ing schools and their relationships to the public schools. Dr. 
Edward Davens of the State Department of Health led discussions 
on county health programs and their necessary relationships to the 
responsibilities of teachers in public schools. 

The rapid growth of the parent education program in the State 
is reflected in the facts that (1) in 1950-51 there were thirteen counties 
which had one or more parent education groups; in 1951-52 there 
were seventeen such counties; and (2) in 1950-51 there were 72 parent 
education groups in the counties of Maryland, with a total of 701 
participants; in 1951-52 there were 90 such groups, with a t'otal of 
1,176 participants. 

Child study and parent education groups work with data which 
evidence the truth that curriculum requirements must be geared to 
the abilities and aptitudes of all boys and girls, including those con- 
tinuing in school as a result of the new compulsory school attendance 
law. In this knowledge, supervisors of pupil personnel and visiting 
teachers feel that they must prepare themselves to participate effec- 
tively in curriculum development workshops and other types of in- 
service teacher education programs. The acceptance of all pupils 
by the school and the provision of appropriate programs of educa- 
tion suggest the most promising approaches which should be made 
to problems arising from the requirement that all children to age six- 
teen attend school regularly. These problems confirm the im- 
portance of parent education, analytical studies of dropouts, be- 
havior and emotional problems, the co-ordination with the school 
of social agencies and special services, and the differentiation of in- 
struction and materials to meet widely varying abilities and aptitudes 
of those now in our secondary schools. 

These differences express themselves most clearly in the com- 
petence of individuals in the field of the language arts. The level 
of reading, writing, spelling, and speaking is a sure index to the 
social maturity and intellectual capacity of the individual. The 
leadership-training program in the State this year was designed to 
prepare supervisors and teachers better to cope with this reality. 
Mrs. Marjorie S. Johnson of the Reading Clinic of Temple Uni- 
versity, working with county school personnel in regional meetings, 
demonstrated (1) how to estimate reading levels in group situations; 
(2) how to direct reading-study activities; and (3) how to provide 
for individual differences in the class group. These meetings were 
held at the State Teachers College at Frostburg, the State Teachers 
College at Towson, and the State Teachers College at Salisbury. 
Mr. Thomas J. Edwards of the Reading Clinic of Temple University 



22 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



performed a similar service for colored principals and supervisors at 
the State Teachers College at Bowie. The State Supervisor of 
Colored Schools followed the Bowie conference on reading with 
three regional conferences which provided opportunity for more local 
school people, principals, and teachers, to participate. 

By mid-year the State Supervisor of Elementary Schools had 
received reports from local supervisors which indicated that every 
county in the State was working in this field. Some counties have 
developed county-wide programs. Others are working through 
faculty groups in local schools. 

In these leadership-training activities, general recognition was 
given to the fact that language arts are the most important means 
used in this or in any society to express experiences and to com- 
municate meanings. Educationally, they have the highest prestige 
value of all the arts. But they are not the only arts and not the 
only means available for expressing experiences and communicating 
meanings. Some children have far greater aptitude in the practical 
arts, in the graphic arts, or in the music arts. All children can 
deepen and broaden their education through these arts, as well as 
through the language arts. In deference to this truth, the Division 
of Instruction appointed representative State committees to plan the 
extension and improvement of programs in these other art fields. 
The State committee on the graphic arts, including the four county 
supervisors of art, teachers of art in the State teachers colleges, and 
members of the Division of Instruction, met at the State Depart- 
ment of Education in November and again in January. At these 
meetings a summer workshop was planned to prepare a bulletin on 
guideposts to art education. This material would give direction and 
form to the program and facilitate the mobilization of resources for 
art instruction in the schools of the State. The art workshop was 
held as planned at the State Teachers College, Towson, the week 
of June 23, 1952. Fifty-seven elementary teachers, teachers of 
art, and art supervisors attended. The consultants were Dr. 
Theodore L. Low, Educational Director of Walters Art Gallery; 
Miss Belle Boas, Director of Education, Baltimore Museum of Art; 
Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, Director of the Institute for Child Study, 
University of Maryland ; and Dr. Leon L. Winslow, Director of Art 
Education, Baltimore City Department of Education. The work- 
shop group prepared materials on the place of art in the total school 
program, bases for classifying art experiences, and personnel and 
materials needed in an effective art program. The report from the 
workshop will be used as the text for the art bulletin. During the 
next school year illustrative materials drawn from various classrooms 
will be added, the materials organized, and the bulletin published 
probably during the school year 1953-54. 

The movement to improve and expand the music program in the 
schools, which began in 1947 with a survey of present practices, was 
advanced to another stage of development in 1951-52. Dr. Lilla 
Belle Pitts of Teachers College, Columbia University, served as 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



consultant at four regional meetings, one each at the State Teachers 

Colleges at Bowie, Frostburg, Salisbury, and Towson. One telling 

truth was demonstrated most convincingly at these meetings; that 

is, ''Music is for all children." The State Committee on Music 

Education, consisting of county supervisors of music, representative 

principals and general supervisors, and members of the Division of 

Instruction met at the State Department on October 29, 1951, to 

evaluate last year's regional meetings and to project the series of 

meetings for the current year. Dr. Pitts re-emphasized the premises 

upon which must be based plans for improvement and expansion: 

* 'Expression through musical activity is a normal expression. We 

should begin with music as a normal part of communal living. Music i 

tends to be relived in everything a little child does. If we are going ' 

to have a general program which is enriched all along the line by a 

great variety of ways of expressing oneself musically, we are not • 

going to separate music into general and special. General culture 

comes through the growth of individuals, not through developing 

experts." The State Committee on Music Education then projected 

the steps to be taken in the further development of the program 

following this year's series of regional meetings: 

(1) A summer workshop at the State level. This could be 
devoted to pulling together and editing for publication, 
with illustrative materials, best practices in the counties 
of Maryland. These practices should represent balanced 
programs in the primary, intermediate, junior high, and 
senior high school grades; that is, they should illustrate in 
balanced interrelatedness singing, rhythmic activities, pur- 
poseful listening, the making of music, and creative 
activities. 

(2) Promotion of local, county, and intercounty meetings. 

Dr. Jessie L. Fleming, Instructor of Music at the State Teachers 
College at Salisbury, undertook late in the year to prepare a state- 
ment delineating the desired music program and listing the texts and 
audio-visual materials essential to the realization of this program. 
Her statement was drawn in part from the survey made in 1947 by 
Dr. James L. Mursell of Columbia University and in part from her 
own doctoral study of the competencies needed by classroom teachers 
to pursue the desired program. This material will be issued by the 
State Department of Education as an expression of our music 
"platform", the goals and practices which school people throughout 
the State can accept and for which they can work in agreement. The 
State Committee on Music Education plans that a companion 
bulletin containing accounts of good programs and practices now in 
effect shall be prepared at a workshop at the State Teachers College 
at Frostburg in June, 1953. This second bulletin will be in the 
nature of a resource unit for the dissemination of sound procedures 
and effective means of advancing music education. 

The growing importance of the United States in world affairs 
led to a reconsideration this year of the place of the foreign language 



24 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



arts in the programs of both elementary and secondary schools. Dr. 
Henry Lee Smith, Jr., of the Foreign Service Institute, Department 
of State, who in 1950-51 explored with the Division of Instruction 
the meaning of language as the core element in any culture, was re- 
tained this year to serve as consultant to a State committee on the 
place of foreign languages in the total school program. This com- 
mittee, representative of instructors in foreign languages on college 
staffs, teachers of foreign languages in secondary schools, school ad- 
ministrators, elementary classroom teachers, and members of the 
Division of Instruction, was given the responsibility of studying the 
present status of language instruction in the public schools of the 
State and of planning the extension and improvement of that pro- 
gram. Dr. Smith met with the committee at the State Department 
of Education on November 19, 1951, on ways of extending and im- 
proving the teaching of foreign languages. One subcommittee, ap- 
pointed in November, reported at a second meeting later in the year a 
plan for expanding the base of language teaching in elementary 
schools, shifting stress from technical analysis of the written language 
to oral communication, and, with the help of mechanical aids, in- 
volving considerably more pupils in language study on the secondary 
school level. Another subcommittee was appointed to plan ex- 
perimental programs for elementary schools. 

This year the State Department of Education promoted for the 
first time the use of television as a new type of audio-visual resource. 
Programs were offered as a worthwhile educative experience for 
children and teachers and as a vivid means of interpreting the school 
to the community. Late in April, 1952, a committee consisting of 
members of the Division of Instruction, the Division of Finance and 
Research, and supervisors from Baltimore and Anne Arundel 
counties projected a series of telecasts from local schools. A mobile 
unit from Station WMAR-TV went on the date fixed to the local 
school for the pickup of an actual class in operation. The schedule 
of telecasts from county schools was as follows: 

May 8 First grade class of the Glendale School in Anne Arundel County — 

"Green Thumbs or Science in Everyday Living" 
May 22 Sixth grade class of the Gray Manor School in Baltimore County — • 

"Beauty May Be Expressed in Many Forms" 
May 29 Seventh grade home economics class of the Glen Burnie Junior High 

School — "How to Make and Serve a Salad for a Balanced Lunch" 
June 5 Physical education class of the Gray Manor School — "How the Teacher 

Uses the Services of a Consultant" 

The library as the major school center for channeling appro- 
priate resources into all school programs continued this year to in- 
crease per capita expenditures for books. However, the stress in 
supervisory services was not upon the size of the library but upon 
the character of the books selected. These accessions must reflect 
the wide variations in reading ability and interest found among 
pupils. They must support and service differentiations made in the 
instructional program. To emphasize the mutual responsibilities 
of librarian and principal in adapting services and materials to 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



individual needs, the State Supervisor of School and Children's 
Libraries arranged three one-day meetings on this subject. Mrs. 
Mary Peacock Douglas, Supervisor of Libraries, Public Schools, 
Raleigh, North Carolina, served as consultant and led discussions on 
the topic, 'The Librarian, the Principal, and the School Program.'' 
A canvassing of the uses of the library this year indicated that the 
State-wide strengthening of the language arts program has influenced 
the method of selecting library materials and the quality of the 
materials selected. 

The State Supervisor of Curriculum of the State Department 
of Education has advanced to near completion three types of pro- 
jects designed to create essential instructional materials not now 
available in the schools. By June, 1952, a collection of about six 
hundred pictures, with scripts written in many cases by the children 
of the State, had been made on geographical, historical, occupational 
and industrial, social, scenic, and unique conditions in Maryland. 
Each county has its own portfolio of pictures organized in these 
classifications. Each county has developed also a set of slides on 
living in the county, with scripts to accompany them. In addition, 
the following slides have been made to illustrate good teaching 
practices : 

100 slides on activities in a twelfth-grade class on personal and 

social problems, Montgomery Blair Senior High School, 

Montgomery County 
250 slides on the outdoor biological laboratory and garden and 

recreation area at the Kitzmiller School, Garrett County 
148 slides on the outdoor education program at Red House 

Elementary School in Garrett County 
A unit of work on maple sugar done by a class in Garrett County 

105 slides on the core program in Gwynn Park Senior-Junior 
High School in Prince George's County 

The third aspect of the program aimed at the development of 
essential instructional and resource materials has to do with the 
preparation of conservation bulletins. The Division of Instruction 
in co-operation with other State agencies and county school per- 
sonnel will publish readable materials that inform and conduce to 
helpful attitudes with respect to the conservation of resources in our 
own State. Scientists and teachers have co-operated in writing 
authentic, nontechnical, interesting materials for the use of the 
pupils themselves. Maryland's Sunken Treasure, This Is Our 
Wealth, and Farming the Chesapeake are well on the way to com- 
pletion. Six other bulletins are in various stages of development. 

In the spring of 1952 the Division of Finance and Research 
and the Division of Instruction made tentative plans to advance the 
program of evaluation which had been the subject of the Second 
and Third Annual Maryland Educational Conferences in 1949 and 
1950. The report of the 1950 conference represented an attempt to 



26 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



project scales for measuring those educational outcomes which do 
not lend themselves so readily to standardized paper and pencil 
tests. Such outcomes include health, critical thinking, apprecia- 
tions, and democratic beliefs and values. Representatives of the 
two divisions conferred with Mr. Arthur L. Benson of the Educa- 
tional Testing Service on the possibility of further refining and de- 
veloping the raw materials of the report. Although definite steps 
were not taken during the year, plans were made to draw upon the 
Educational Testing Service for consultant help in promoting the 
development of a well-rounded evaluation program in the schools of 
the State. 

Special Education 

A second major area of interest to the Division of Instruction 
this year relates to the needs of atypical children. The State Board 
of Education authorized the State Superintendent of Schools to ap- 
point a committee which would be responsible for a careful study of 
the^e needs. Mr. George W. Constable, a prominent and civic- 
minded attorney of Baltimore City, was made chairman of the 
committee which met several times during the year and projected 
plans for assembling data on the extent and nature of the needs of 
atypical children. Subcommittees for the various aspects of the 
study were appointed, each subcommittee consisting of an educator, 
a specialist, and a lay person. These subcommittees engaged in 
studying data and visiting educational institutions. Later they 
will make recommendations concerning the program. The study 
will continue for another year or two and culminate in a report to the 
State Board of Education. Much of the interest and effort of the 
State Supervisor of Special Education centered this year in the 
work of this committee. 

The State Supervisor of Special Education reports also that, as 
of May 1952, there were seventy-two applications for special aid to 
handicapped children, with a total of $35,264.26 State money com- 
mitted. This program is a recently instituted service for those 
handicapped children who are not educated in either regular or 
special classes or at home; that is, those for whom the local board 
of education has no appropriate program. If such a handicapped 
child is of school age, if he is enrolled in a school which offers instruc- 
tion appropriate to his needs, and if his parents have been legal 
residents of Maryland for at least one year, up to ^600 of State aid 
is made available under rules and regulations established by the 
State Board of Education. Applications are made to the local 
board of education and are approved at both local and State levels 
for a period of one year. An annual evaluation of each case is re- 
quired. 

Trends in other services for handicapped children in the counties 
of Maryland may be summarized as follows: There were twelve 
counties with twenty-two full-time and six part-time speech correc- 
tionists. Approximately thirty special classes for mentally-retarded 
children on the elementary level were approved this year. This rep- 



Maryland State Depahtment of Education 



27 



resents a decrease over last year, but only because of a lack of space 
and inability to get qualified teachers. A new center for orthopedi- 
cally-handicapped children was established in Anne Arundel County 
in March. Another will be opened in Prince George's County in 
September. The most urgent problem, with which many counties 
are requesting assistance, is the development and administration of a 
program suitable to slow-learning and mentally-retarded children 
at the junior high school level. 

Supervisory Programs 

The third major area of interest to the Division of Instruction 
this year has to do with the functions of supervision and problems 
relating to the administration of supervisory programs in the coun- 
ties of the State. Trends and problems may be summarized as 
follows: 

(1) Large turnover among beginning teachers. The State 
Supervisor of High Schools believes that a very small per- 
centage of these teachers is totally inept. They should 
not be judged on how well they can manage the classroom 
situation immediately. Teacher education colleges pre- 
pare their students for initial service. School principals 
and supervisors are responsible for a program of on-the-job 
education which will enable teachers to develop into 
mature persons with adult attitudes and understandings; 
into good teachers who are masters of their art; and into 
helpful members of the profession contributing con- 
structively to the advancement of teaching and the im- 
provement of their communities. 

(2) Variation in supervisory techniques. Supervision at the 
local school and county levels should not consist pre- 
dominantly of going into the classroom and sitting in judg- 
ment on instructional procedures. The number of teachers 
not fully qualified for classroom work is increasing. The 
ratio of such teachers to the total teaching force is ap- 
proaching one-fifth. Supervisors must now spend more 
time planning with new teachers, meeting with them as a 
group and helping them co-operatively find answers to 
their problems, and arranging visits for them to ex- 
perienced, competent teachers. Some beginning teachers 
should be continued in a well-organized program of edu- 
cation in which the theory and practice of teaching are 
unified. 

(3) The principal must be held responsible primarily for the 
development of an effective program in his school and for 
the in-service education of his staff. The supervisor needs 
to work with the principal in terms of his supervisory 
activities rather than take over the supervisory program. 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



Some principals now seem inclined to delegate professional 
responsibilities to assistants to serve as directors of 
curriculum and supervisors of instruction. When this is 
done, the principal plays ''second fiddle" to that person 
who runs the instructional program. When supervision 
fails, the failure is due more frequently to deficiencies in the 
general education of the supervisor (principal and /or 
supervisor) than to lack of technical skill. The super- 
visor is a leader in an adult education program. He 
must know much about many things. His general edu- 
cation must have breadth as well as depth. He must be 
able to follow interesting and fruitful ramifications, im- 
plications, and interrelationships of subjects and problems 
and to be aware of aspects and possibilities that are not so 
obvious. Four counties have a definite program for 
training principals in this most important function. Super- 
visors in one of these counties have reported this to be the 
most rewarding of their activities. Since the number of 
nonteaching elementary school principals is increasing 
slowly, there should also be an in-service training program 
designed particularly to meet the needs of this group. 
While certain counties have been increasing the number 
of nonteaching elementary school principals, other coun- 
ties have been employing co-ordinators of instruction to 
provide adequate professional leadership for elementary 
school programs. The patterns of organization for super- 
visory programs and operational relationships in these pro- 
grams differ widely from county to county. Critical 
study of these programs should be undertaken for the 
purpose of establishing principles which should determine 
patterns of organization and modes of operation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

A very significant development in the field of vocational edu- 
cation during the fiscal year 1951-52 was the great expansion in the 
physical facilities in the new junior and senior high school buildings 
over the State. The boards of education and the superintendents of 
schools are to be commended for their recognition of the importance 
of the contribution which the vocational and practical arts programs 
make to the total program of education for Maryland youth. 

In specific areas very encouraging accomplishments have been 
made. One of these areas is in the field of work experience, whereby 
the pupils in the senior high schools learn while they earn, spending itn 
the morning in school pursuing the regular academic subjects, and 
spending the afternoon in employment for which they receive the pre- ,,i 
vailing hourly rate of compensation as other beginners in similar i \ t\ 

positions. These pupils meet all the vocational and State laws i 
governing employment. It is an excellent opportunity for co- 
ordinating the efforts of the school with the interest of employers i i | 
and communities. The school likewise uses the community as its | I 
educational laboratory for actual work experience. i | 

Another area which is being developed modestly yet very pro- 
fitably is that of farm laboratories, a number of which have been , ,, 
acquired for the senior high school agriculture students. 

In the field of homemaking continued progress has been made in , 
improving facilities which offer practical experiences for future home- 
makers, either through adequate space within the high school build- 
ing or the acquisition of a dwelling adjacent to the high school. 
These programs give evidence of continued growth and increased in- 
terest on the part of the educational leaders of the State as well as 
the parents of the students. 

In future planning it is necessary to recognize the fact that 
there will be a significant increase in the enrollment in the junior 
and senior high schools during the next three or four years, and im- 
mediate steps should be made to plan for additional teachers in voca- 
tional education and practical arts so that they may be available 
as the increased enrollment of the elementary school begins to make 
itself evident in the enrollment in the junior and senior high schools. 

Home Economics in the County Schools 

The home economics program in 1951-52 shows an increased 
number of girls enrolled in the course in most counties, necessitating 
an increased number of home economics teachers and more space. 
As an example, in Prince George's county about 4,500 girls are en- 
rolled, including all girls in grades 7, 8, and 9, and about one-third 
of the girls in the senior high school. The teacher supply from the 
teacher training departments in Maryland Colleges (University 
of Maryland, Hood, Western Maryland, and St. Joseph's) is inade- 
quate, although a larger number of students are entering teacher 



30 



Eighty- Sixth Annual Report 



training in the freshman classes, and more are transferring from 
general home economics courses. Other states have the same prob- 
lem so that it is increasingly difficult to fill positions, and many 
teachers do not meet the State requirements. A large number stay 
in positions only one year or less, which creates a problem in main- 
taining and improving a continuing program. The teacher situation 
in the colored schools is quite different, as more candidates for 
teaching positions are graduated from Maryland State College at 
Princess Anne and Morgan State College than can be placed, since 
there is a small percentage of teacher turnover. An exchange 
teacher from England taught in Carroll county this year and found 
the Maryland program very different from the English concept of 
home economics which is centered on development of skills with no 
family-life emphasis. 

The State supervisors participated in curriculum development 
in home and family life in the counties, co-operating with supervisors 
of high schools (there are eight county supervisors) ; participating in 
workshops; directing committees on specific problems; and assigning 
teacher groups with problems. They participated in State and 
national professional organizations through committee work and 
programs; attended and participated in the National Conference of 
State Supervisors of Home Economics (U. S. Office of Education); 
assisted in plans for organization of the home economics program for 
the Inter-American Conference held at the University of Maryland 
in August; surveyed, at the request of the State Welfare Department, 
the facilities and program in homemaking at the Montrose and 
Barrett schools, organized two three-day conferences on evaluation 
with Dr. Sara Anne Brown of West Virginia as consultant for the 
county supervisors of home economics, teacher trainers, and some 
teachers from counties not having supervisors; participated in three 
regional conferences for high school principals conducted by Dr. 
Cromwell; participated in curriculum development by furnishing 
materials for resource bulletins to be published by the State Depart- 
ment of Education under the direction of Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins, 
Supervisor of Curriculum; participated in committee work organized 
under home economics in the U. S. Office of Education for co- 
operative study of policies concerning business-sponsored educational 
resource materials ; and made administrative reviews of all vocational 
home economics departments in the counties. 

The two home economics youth organizations^ — Future Home- 
makers of America and New Homemakers of America— have in- 
creased in enrollment during the year. The Future Homemakers of 
America, with Miss M. Gladys Dickerson as State adviser, has over 
1,000 members and 35 chapters. A State meeting was held in Balti- 
more in the fall of 1951. They support a scholarship annually for a 
prospective home economics teacher studying at a Maryland college. 
The New Homemakers of America, with over 1,000 members, has a 
chapter in each home economics department of the colored high 
schools, with one of the State supervisors as State adviser and six 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



regional advisers. A State meeting was held at the Maryland State 
College, Princess Anne, in the spring, and six regional meetings 
were held in the fall. Six chapter delegates with four advisers at- 
tended the National N.H.A. Convention at Tuskegee in June, 1952. 



Educational Services to Industry 

Top management in Maryland industry has been most active 
in seeking help in learning the techniques of leading conferences and 
handling people. They are glad to learn Vocational Education has 
been active in this area for many years. They have heard about 
''group dynamics" and ''group processes" and readily see that it is a 
new name for what all good conference leader trainers know and do. (] 

This Department was asked to assist several of the State and * 

City agencies in setting up specific training programs: the Baltimore P 

City Department of Education in their "Summer Workshop for Jj 
Custodians;" the Housing Authority of Baltimore City in teaching 
Maintenance Supervisors in "Preventive Maintenance;" and the 

University of Maryland in their "Vocational Education Seminar for Jj 

Latin American Representatives." «j 

Industrial Education 

f 

The State Supervisor of Industrial Education conducted a series J, 

of conferences throughout the school year with local supervisors, r 

principals, and teacher groups. These conferences centered around ' 

administrative practices of various schools, articulation between [ 

schools, development of new courses of study, development of new • 

teaching aids and techniques, shop planning, and course organiza- * 

tion. J 

Particular emphasis was placed on evaluation of all vocational- • 
industrial training programs. The evaluation consisted of a review 
of facilities, administrative practices, methods of financing, teacher 
qualifications, course of study, pupil selection, placement, follow-up 
of graduates, and follow-up of dropouts. 

Many of the local problems were resolved into topics of study. 
Work groups were organized for the purpose of analyzing the prob- 
lems and recommending workable solutions. Some of the problems 
are herewith identified: 

1. Production jobs — and effective means of developing salable skills 

2. Shop conditioning in keeping with modern industrial training and 
methods 

3. Effective methods of shop organization and management 

4. Principles of vocational education and their application 

5. Budgeting funds to provide for a more adequate program 

6. Evaluation of vocational industrial programs at all levels 



32 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 

7. Placement and follow-up of the trade-school graduate 

8. Follow-up of dropouts of trade and industrial courses 

9. Improving group and individual instruction methods 

10. Organizing trade-extension courses a> needed by industry 

11. Organizing public service occupations classes 

12. Development of supervisory and job instruction programs 

13. Organization of defense training classes 

14. Organization of related instruction classes for apprentices 
1.5. Organization of custodial training program 

16. Organization of preventive maintenance at supervisory and mechanic 
levels 

17. Organization of foreman program to improve communication skills in 

speech,reading, and writing 

The State Supervisor of Industrial Education worked very 
closely with staff members of the local boards of education and per- 
sonnel of the representative industries for the purpose of developing 
better understanding of what the high schools are attempting to do 
in the vocational training programs. Representatives from local 
plants were encouraged to visit the vocational centers. Plant visita- 
tions were arranged for teachers, principals, and supervisors to ob- 
serve in-plant training programs, production methods, and shop 
layouts. Special plant tours were also arranged for vocational stu- 
dents for the purpose of giving them an opportunity to learn more 
about employment opportunities and to give personnel a chance to 
talk with the students concerning their vocational interests. Classes 
were organized in practically all phases of vocational-industrial in- 
struction. The following provides a brief summary concerning the 
scope of these programs: 

1. Approximately twelve thousand different individuals were served 
through trade or extension programs operated on a full-time basis. 

2. Trade classes were offered in twenty-nine different occupations. 

3. Trade programs were organized in ten occupations specifically for girls. 

4. Full-time veterans' training classes were organized in fifteen occupa- 
tions. 

5. Apprentice training classes were organized in nine occupations. 

6. Thirty different courses were offered in the trade extension program. 

7. Approximately four thousand five hundred pupils were enrolled in the 
full-time trade schools. 

8. Approximately eight hundred and forty girls were enrolled in full-time 
trade classes. 

9. Approximately seven thousand students were enrolled in evening ex- 
tension classes. 

10. Six hundred and fourteen of the evening extension students were 
women. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



11. One hundred and forty public school custodians received custodial 
training. 

12. Approximately one thousand supervisors and foremen received training 
in supervisory management. 

The percentage of placements of the trade and industrial gradu- 
ates was higher during this period than any other time during the 
past decade. Approximately 80 per cent are working in trades and 
occupations related to that for which training was given. This year 
there were not enough trainee graduates to begin to satisfy the de- 
mand. It is mutually agreed that the emploj^er wants a mature 
worker and that students in the future be encouraged to complete 
their training or to persist in school until graduation. 

Co-operation with local employee and employer groups has 
enhanced the prestige of vocational education and has enabled the 
Division to make contacts with people and groups who not only 
want to use available services but are exceedingly anxious to be of 
assistance in the development of new and better programs at large. 

Agricultural Education 

The past year witnessed some new developments and a contin- 
uation of modern trends in vocational agriculture. Several new 
consolidated departments came into operation with splendid facilities 
for farm mechanics. Farm labor shortage is State- wide with the 
result that farm mechanics instruction is much in demand. As the 
veterans' farm training program nears completion there is increasing 
interest in adult and young farmer classes. A shortage of qualified 
agricultural teachers has prevented any marked expansion of this 
program. Consolidation of smaller departments has kept the total 
number of departments nearly constant. Farm practice labora- 
tories (school farms) have increased slightly in number and the 
background of experience has shown new possibilities in their use. 

The professional in-service training of teachers has continued in * 
a number of ways. Dr. George Deyoe, Professor of Agricultural 
Education at the University of Illinois, came to Maryland twice as a 
consultant in vocational agriculture. From his visits has develop- 
ed better understandings and techniques for the broadening of 
pupils' farming programs. The special three- week summer session 
for teachers of vocational agriculture at the University of Mary- 
land is proving most valuable and popular. The State-wide summer 
conference, together with county and area workshops and con- 
ferences dealing with current problems, has been continued and 
proves most helpful. 

The operations of the Future Farmers of America and the New 
Farmers of America have followed a fairly uniform pattern for the 
past fotir years. The F.F.A. has a membership of 2,123 boys. It has 
an annuai two-day convention in late June at the University. Area 
officer leadership conferences were held in September and October for 
chapter officers. Twenty-seven representatives and delegates at- 



34 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



tended the National F.F.A. Convention at Kansas City in October. 
Eighteen chapters gave radio programs and fifteen chapters held 
community shows or market hog shows and sales. Pupils in voca- 
tional agriculture had upwards of $380,000 invested in farming as 
of January 1, 1952. 

The New Farmers of America membership totaled 617 boys. 
Of this number 290 boys participated in community fairs and ex- 
hibits, 186 repaired farm buildings, 260 participated in the produc- 
tion and conservation of food and 238 in farm safety programs. The 
State convention was held at Princess Anne in May with fourteen 
chapters represented. Nine members attended the National N.F.A. 
Convention at Atlanta. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 
Certification 

The work of certification consisted in obtaining transcripts of 
records and evaluating them, in issuing certificates to administrators, 
supervisors, and teachers in public and nonpublic schools, and in 
participating in interviews and conferences relative to certification. 

As will be seen from TABLE 68, page 109, the total number of 
certificates issued during the year exceeded the number issued in 
1950-51 by 237. A few more administrators' and supervisors' certi- 
ficates were issued than during the previous year, but 57 fewer regu- 
lar high school teachers' certificates were issued. This decrease, un- 
fortunately, is more than offset by the increase in War Emergency 
Degree Certificates issued for high school teaching. This number 
exceeded that for the previous year by 64. 

One hundred forty-five more applicants for elementary school 
teaching qualified for regular certificates than was the case in 1950-51. 
It was necessary, however, to issue more emergency certificates in 
1951 than during the previous year. Of this excess, 86 altogether, 39 
were college graduates and 47 had not qualified for the bachelor's 
degree. 

Because of this continuing and increasing need to employ 
teachers who do not meet the minimum standards for full certi- 
fication, the State Board of Education was given a special report 
which analyzed the present teacher supply and demand and the 
outlook for the future in these fields. It is obvious that the State 
Teachers Colleges cannot now, and will not in the near future, prepare 
enough elementary school teachers to take care of the constantly in- 
creasing enrollment, of the large turnover resulting partly from the 
tight labor market, and of the need to decrease the size of classes. 
It was proposed, therefore, that a special study of the situation be 
made, with the help of outside experts, if desirable, the study to in- 
clude a consideration of the long-established policy of allowing liberal 
arts colleges to prepare secondary school teachers only and of con- 
fining the work of the Teachers Colleges to the elementary and junior 
high school fields. The Board approved this recommendation. 



Accreditation 

Nonacademic Schools 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1952, 15 trade and 
technical schools applied for and received certificates of approval 



as follows: 

Welders School 1 

Music School 1 

Business School 1 

Navigation School 1 

Dance Schools 11 



36 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



In evaluating some of these schools the advice of a county super- 
visor of business education and of a dance instructor at the University 
of Maryland was used. The navigation school had previously been 
approved by the Officers of the Port Captain's Office and by the 
local office of the Steamboat Inspection Service. 

Nine schools closed during the year mentioned, a few of them 
because they were no longer meeting the standards : 



Construction School 1 

School of Aeronautics 1 

Sewing School 1 

Barber Schools 2 

School of Practical Arts 1 

School of Printing 1 

Beauty Schools 2 



At the request of the Director of the Division, a professional 
advertising artist visited two art schools and advised with regard to 
needed improvements. Also upon request, a teacher of Russian at 
Johns Hopkins University conducted an examination to determine 
whether a particular applicant qualified to tutor in Russian, and a 
teacher of watchmaking in New York City reviewed a proposed re- 
vision of a watchmaking course offered by a Maryland school. The 
revision could not be approved. 

At the direction of the State Superintendent, during the winter 
and spring of 1952 an intensive study of schools approved for veter- 
ans' training was made. The Assistant State Superintendent for 
Vocational Education, other members of the Vocational Division 
in the State Department offices, and supervisors of vocational indus- 
trial education in nearby counties made frequent visits to these 
schools, especially in the evening, and advised how conditions could 
be improved. Desirable changes resulted and the State Superin- 
tendent strengthened the standards, to preclude a repetition of un- 
satisfactory practices. 

Academic Schools 

The relationship between the operators of nonpublic nursery 
schools, kindergartens, and elementary schools with representatives 
of the Department is excellent, and most of the directors and teachers 
are receptive to suggestions. A number of the schools have im- 
proved to a marked degree. 

The supervisor in these areas visited each of the schools at least 
once and some of them two or three times during the year. Fre- 
quently she met with the members of the boards of directors of co- 
operative and community schools and discussed such problems as 
teacher preparation, school quarters, and equipment. 

During the year 1951-52 twelve schools in these categories were 
approved as follows: 



Nursery Schools 5 

Kindergartens 1 

Special Schools 3 

1 utoring Schools 1 

Elementary and Preschool 2 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



Seven centers which appHed for approval failed to meet the 
standards in important respects and could therefore not operate as 
schools. Six of them have functioned as day care centers or play 
groups. Several other groups which were trying to meet the re- 
quirements invited the supervisor for consultation purposes. An- 
other group on Federal Government property requested help al- 
though not subject to the Maryland nonpublic school law. 

The situation with regard to schools of these types by the end 
of the school year, 1951-52, was as follows: 



It was necessary to notify three schools that they must employ 
teachers with a minimum of college and professional training if they 
were to remain on the approved list. In each case the matter was 
presented to a member or members of the board of directors, who indi- 
cated the desire to retain approval. 

Four groups which were using the word ''school" in their names 
but which did not qualify as schools agreed to change their names in 
conformity with the resolution of the State Board of Education 
relative to this matter. 

Nonpublic schools, from nursery through elementary levels, 
are increasing in number and size. More and more parents are be- 
coming aware of the contribution preschool education can make in the 
development of young children. Furthermore, the fact that the 
State provides aid for the education of handicapped children has re- 
sulted in the opening of several schools for special education. 

The local health and fire departments have co-operated in mak- 
ing sure that the nonpublic schools meet the local health and fire 
prevention standards. 

The nonpublic schools share the difficulty of the public schools 
in obtaining qualified teachers or teachers with at least two years of 
college work and some professional training. The situation is some- 
what aggravated in the nonpublic schools because of the compara- 
tively low salaries paid and because usually the work is only of a part- 
time character. 

The Supervisor who was responsible for nonpublic academic 
secondary schools visited all the schools in this category during the 
academic year. In most cases he held conferences with the prin- 
cipal or headmaster and discussed the school program and qualifica- 
tions of the teaching staff and the facilities, and observed classes. 



Privately owned 

Community sponsored... 
Co-operatively operated 

Church sponsored 

College practice schools. 

Incorporated 

Closed voluntarily 



.77 
31 
.16 
. 1 
. 2 
20 
2 



38 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



One elementary school which had been approved added a 
secondary division, which received approval after a visit by the 
Director of Accreditation and the Supervisor. 

A Government apprentice school requested accreditation but 
failed to meet the academic requirements. 

In the higher education field the services of the deans of three 
out-of-State universities were engaged to survey a professional school 
which wished authority to issue a degree. The group was of the 
opinion that the school should make certain adjustments before the 
State Board of Education should authorize the issuance of the de- 
gree. The institution is now attempting to make these changes. 

Upon special request, two correspondence courses which the 
Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insurance wished to offer its em- 
ployees were evaluated with the help of consultants from Johns 
Hopkins University and Goucher College and were approved by the 
State Superintendent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The programs and activities of the Division of Library Extension 
are developed for the purpose of extending and improving public, 
school, college, and institution libraries throughout the State. The 
staff works with the public librarians and trustees, the school librari- 
ans and school administrators, and the State institution librarians 
and officers to help them develop and improve library services. 
It works with local and State groups and organizations: to interpret 
library services; to promote local leadership for establishing libraries 
where they do not exist or give little service; and to further under- 
standing of the possibilities of improved library service with increased 
financial support. 

The supervisors spend much of their time in the counties visiting 
libraries and consulting with librarians, library trustees, and school 
and institution officials to develop library collections and service 
which will be of better value to the people. Groups of citizens in 
Calvert, Carroll, and Worcester Counties were assisted in planning 
for county-wide service in the future. 

The Division lends books, pamphlets, periodicals, clippings, and 
audio-visual aids to the local libraries to supplement their collections 
and to people in areas with no public library service. The counties 
borrowed 62,868 pieces of material in 1951-52. This was a ten per 
cent gain over the previous year. The largest increase was in the 
use of book exhibits. Another large increase was in the use of audio- 
visual materials. 

Sixty-one per cent of all loans were made because of requests 
from the 14 counties with county-wide library service. The work of 
the county librarians increases the work of the Division rather than 
decreases it because the people in these counties are m.ade aware of 
what library service offers. They are asking for materials which the 
county libraries cannot yet supply. Thirty-seven hundred and seven 
requests were received which required reference searching in the 
Division's collection or arrangement for interlibrary loan from the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library or from other sources. Thirty-seven 
hundred and thirty-four pieces of material were borrowed from 
other libraries for loan to the counties. This was a 24 per cent de- 
crease from the previous year and indicates that the Division's collec- 
tion is becoming more adequate. 

Book Exhibits 

One of the purposes of the Division of Library Extension is to 
assist schools in the selection of materials for their libraries. This 
year the Division assembled two identical exhibits of books grouped 
under broad headings related to the school curriculum, for exhibit 
in the various counties. Each exhibit consisted of 854 books and 
ranged from preschool to senior high school material. Annotated 
lists were furnished with the exhibits. 



40 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



One exhibit was introduced to the supervisors at their October 
meeting in Towson. Its purpose was explained, and time was given 
for examination of it. 

The exhibits were lent to the counties for lengths of time varying 
from two to four weeks, depending on the size of the county. Teach- 
ers, librarians, pupils, and parents were given an opportunity to 
examine the books and to make recommendations to the school 
principal or librarians for purchase. In several counties programs 
on books, authors, and related subjects were given while the exhibit 
was in the county. 

In St. Mary's, Talbot, and Wicomico Counties the County 
Library and the Board of Education jointly sponsored the exhibits. 

Nineteen counties used the exhibits and expressed interest in a 
similar project for another year. In addition, they were displayed 
at the State Teachers' Meeting at the Annual Convention of the 
Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers; at Western Maryland 
College; and at the State Teachers College in Bowie. 

Seven other special exhibits, ranging in number from 75 to 200 
books and totaling 795, were assembled and sent to individual schools 
for their use in selecting materials. 

The Division of Library Extension prepared and staffed other 
book exhibits in College Park for such State meetings as: Rural 
Women's Short Course, 4H Conference, the summer conference of 
the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers and, together with 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library, for the annual CIO Regional Edu- 
cation Conference at New Windsor. 

Public Libraries 

County public libraries are operating in Anne Arundel, Balti- 
more, Cecil, Charles, Garrett, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, 
Prince George's, Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, Talbot, Washington, and 
Wicomico Counties. There are community libraries in Aberdeen, 
Annapolis, Arbutus-Halethorpe, Bel Air, Bethesda, Blue Ridge Sum- 
mit, Pa., Boonsboro, Catonsville, Elkton, Ellicott City, Essex, Fair- 
mont Heights, Four Corners, Gaithersburg, Garrett Park,Glen Burnie, 
Hagerstown, Hancock, Hyattsville, Kensington, LaPlata, Laurel, 
Leonardtown, Lexington Park, Middle River, Oakland, Oxford, 
Pikesville, Relay, Rising Sun, Salisbury, Sandy Spring, Sharpsburg, 
Silver Spring, Smithsburg, Sparrows Point, Sudlersville, Towson, 
Turner's Station, Wheaton, and Williamsport. Twelve counties 
(Howard and Queen Anne's excepted) operate bookmobiles which 
are mobile branch libraries serving about 1,000 other communities. 

Municipal public libraries also serve Baltimore, Cambridge, 
Crisfield, Cumberland, Federalsburg, Frederick, Greenbelt, Hurlock, 
Princess Anne, Ridgely, Rockville, Takoma Park, Vienna, Western- 
port, and Westminster. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



Subscription libraries, which are usually free to children but re- 
quire a fee for adult use, are operated in Cecilton, Chestertown, 
Emmitsburg, Havre de Grace, Pocomoke City, and Snow Hill. 

Public libraries throughout the State continue to show marked 
increases in use made of the books and other materials, in book stock, 
bookmobiles, and local financial support. During the 1951-52 year, 
5,710,232 books were borrowed through public libraries, an increase of 
445,029 over 1950-51. Over 340,000 of this increased use was reported 
by the public libraries in the counties. Book stock in all public librar- 
ies including the Enoch Pratt Library of Baltimore and the Di- 
vision of Library Extension increased by more than 75,000 volumes. 
Fourteen counties have established libraries on a county- wide basis. 

While progress in public library development has been encour- 
aging, it has not yet come near achieving adequate libraries for the 
needs of the State. All have small staffs. Seven county libraries 
employ only one professional librarian, and four of these employ only 
one clerical helper each to give library service to the people of a 
whole county. Only the Enoch Pratt Free Library has a professional 
librarian on duty in the branch libraries and bookmobiles to give 
reading guidance when they are open for service. No library in the 
State has sufficient books to meet the varied needs of its community. 
One county has no public library. Nine counties are without 
county-wide library service. More than 200,000 Maryland citizens 
live in areas where no public library service has been started. 

In recognition of the inadequacies and of the need for more in- 
formation to substantiate their requests for funds to improve their 
programs, a group of library trustees, in the spring of 1952, requested 
the Division of Library Extension to make a survey of county public 
libraries in the State pointing out the progress each library had made 
and its present inadequacies; and to suggest immediate and long 
range plans for improvement. Before undertaking the survey, the 
Division of Library Extension requested the support of the Mary- 
land Library Association in a co-operative project to set up goals 
and standards of public library service in Maryland. The Legis- 
lative and Planning Committee of the M.L.A. and the Division of 
Library Extension worked together to develop specific goals of 
materials and services based on the research, experience, and study 
of the group. Tentative recommendations have been drawn up and 
sent out for criticism. The final reports will be completed in the 
fall of 1952. 

As part of its service to public libraries, the Division of Library 
Extension held two workshops for public library administrators dur- 
ing the year. The first, held in October, 1951, in Oakland at the 
Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, emphasized 'The Library 
in the Community." Mrs. Marion E. Hawes, Co-ordinator of Work 
with Adults, Enoch Pratt Free Library, served as consultant. About 
30 librarians and trustees attended the two-day meeting. 



42 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



The second workshop session, April 24-25, 1952, was planned 
around the problem of effective preparation and presentation of the 
library budget. Consultants were Mr. Richard W. Barrett and 
Mr. William H. Kohlberg from the Federal Bureau of the Budget. 
The philosophy, the techniques, and the use of performance budgets 
were discussed from the point of view of usefulness in public ad- 
ministration. 

It is believed that such conferences are effective means of 
developing improved techniques and services in the public libraries 
in the State. 

The first annual appropriation of $206,759.00, or $1.33 per 
capita, was made by Montgomery County for its Department of 
Public Libraries. Independent libraries were brought into the sys- 
tem and county branches were operated at Four Corners, Gaithers- 
burg, Garrett Park, Noyes Library in Kensington, Sandy Spring, 
Silver Spring, and Wheaton. Three bookmobiles served areas 
formerly without service and most of the schools — public, parochial, 
and private. 

Several libraries have received very nice bequests and gifts. 
The Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County received about $1,200 
in memory of a lifelong resident of Oakland whose family suggested 
that friends not send flowers but money to the library to purchase 
books. Memorial bookplates recognize such gifts. 



School Libraries 

In the 1951 report three major school library problems which 
needed attention and action at the State level were listed as follows: 

1. A consistent, integrated program for educating librarians — 
especially part-time ones — within the State 

2. Recognition of the fact that some counties are ready for 
elementary school librarians, which means the State has a 
responsibility for recognizing the need and making pro- 
vision for them 

3. Certification regulations for library supervisors at the 
county level 

It is gratifying to be able to report that careful attention has 
been given to each of the three problems: 

1. The University of Maryland has a tentative plan for offering 
a basic program in Library Science beginning in the fall of 
1953. The plan is still tentative as the budget has not yet 
been approved. If approved, the courses will be offered in 
the Department of Education in both regular and summer 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



sessions. The plan was worked out by Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, 
Dean, and Mr. Howard Rovelstad, Librarian, in consulta- 
tion with the staff of the Division of Library Extension and 
with the approval of Dr. Harry C. Byrd. 

A similar program started in the Education Department 
at Morgan State College last year continues. Dr. Virgil 
A. Clift, head of the Education Department, and Mr. Wilk 
Peters, director of the program, in consultation with the 
staff of the Division of Library Extension, are constantly 
studying and evaluating it in terms of student and school 
needs. It should prove a valuable pre-service training for 
teacher-librarians. 

Extension courses in the materials for instruction offered 
by Western Maryland College, under the direction of Dr. 
Joseph R. Bailer, made an important contribution to the 
in-service training of librarians and teacher-Ubrarians. 

2. The Committee on Certification is currently studying prob- 
lems which are of immediate concern as 

a. Baltimore County is appointing librarians for its 
larger elementary schools. 

b. Baltimore and Prince George's Counties will each ap- 
point a supervisor of school library services by Septem- 
ber, 1952. 

c. Counties with combination elementary and high 
schools in one building are concerned with the prob- 
lem of the allocation of the librarian's time. 

For the third year the Division of Library Extension and the 
Division of Instruction sponsored one-day workshops for school 
librarians under the direction of Mrs. Mary Peacock Douglas. Two 
regional meetings for principals and librarians were held in Balti- 
more for all Western Shore Counties except Allegany, Garrett, 
Washington, Montgomery, and Prince George's, and one in Easton 
for all Eastern Shore Counties. A total of 250 principals, super- 
visors, and librarians attended the three meetings. Two regional 
meetings will be held in 1953 to cover the counties not included in 
1952. 

The financial support for school libraries continues to increase 
from Board of Education funds. Only five counties — Calvert, 
Carroll, Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, and Talbot now require that 
Board of Education funds be matched by local schools. Two 
counties — Baltimore and Prince George's — have been making 
capital outlay grants for books for new schools. 

State Institutions 

The Division of Library Extension has the responsibility for 
the promotion of improved library service in the State institutions 



44 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



by acting in an advisory capacity to heads of the State departments 
having supervision over institutions, to superintendents of institu- 
tions themselves, and to staff members responsible for operating 
the library. In addition to the consultant service, the Division also 
lends books and other material to the institutions, prepares lists 
and exhibits of materials for special purposes, and assists the institu- 
tion staff s in the selection of library materials to be purchased by 
the institution. 

Library services continue to show improvement in the State 
tuberculosis hospitals. Plans are underway for the development of 
an improved service when the new Mount Wilson Hospital building 
is completed. The Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries 
has advised the Department of Health on plans, furniture, and equip- 
ment for library quarters and at the request of the Chief of Tuber- 
culosis Services submitted a suggested job description for the 
librarian position. 

Libraries in the State juvenile training schools have shown little 
change during the t)ast year. Lack of library personnel, turnover of 
supervisory and administrative personnel, and lack of space are 
partly responsible for the fact that a continuing plan for develop- 
ment has been impossible. There is an increased use of books 
loaned from this Division to the schools. Requests have been regu- 
lar for films and books for staff-training programs. The Supervisor 
of County and Institution Libraries is working on library standards 
as a part of the Department's project of development of educational 
standards for the State training schools. 

A detailed plan for patient's library service in the State Mental 
Hospitals was submitted to the Commissioner of the State Depart- 
ment of Mental Hygiene and the Director of Rehabilitation. This 
plan emphasizes the need for professional librarians in charge of the 
libraries, adequate budgets for books and other material, and for pro- 
grams of library activities available to all patients able to use such 
service. At present interest is evidenced in an improved and capably 
directed library service, but other services in the hospitals are con- 
sidered to have priority. The establishment of medical libraries at 
present is receiving attention by hospital administrators. Patient 
libraries are being operated by the patients and by volunteers from 
service organizations and are reaching only a few of the patients 
who could benefit by library service. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

Another 1,028 workers were added to the labor force in Mary- 
land and the earning power of the State's disabled population was 
increased nearly $2,000,000 as a result of services rendered by the Di- 
vision of Vocational Rehabilitation during the year ending June 30, 
1952. These 1,028 disabled citizens came from every section of the 
State; they were rehabilitated in jobs covering all the standard em- 
ployment classifications from professional and semiprofessional to 
unskilled labor at about the same distribution as obtains among 
workers as a whole. They are supporting with their earnings not 
only themselves but also 1,088 dependents. 

In addition to the persons who were rehabilitated, services were 
rendered to another 3,324; and 2,520 more persons were registered 
but plans for their rehabilitation had not been completed on June 30. 
The total live roll for the year, therefore, was 6,872 cases represent- 
ing approximately one-third of the 20,000 known disabled population 
of the State. 

Highlights of the year's activities outside the area of case work 
were: 

1. Inauguration of the first sustaining TV program on Re- 
habilitation in the country 

2. Intensified staff -training program including a week's work- 
shop at Frostburg State Teachers College; and a four-day 
regional conference at Annapolis on the emotional problems 
of the handicapped 

3. Expansion and improvement of our services to the mentally 
handicapped. The State Department of Mental Hygiene 
co-operated by assigning a full-time rehabilitation worker 
to co-ordinate the occupational and work therapies in the 
State hospitals. 

Television 

''Comeback," a program dedicated to the courageous men and 
women of Maryland who have fought against serious physical handi- 
caps and won, who have learned through bitter experience that the 
only real security is that which is found within oneself, is sponsored 
by the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation of the State Depart- 
ment of Education and presented on alternate Tuesdays from 6 :30 to 
6:55 P. M. by Station WMAR-TV, Channel 2, Baltimore, as a public 
service feature. 

During the first year of the telecast (the initial program was on 
February 27, 1952), a total of 25 disabled persons were special guests 
of Mr. Robert C. Thompson, Director of the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation, who served as moderator. Eight employers and 
seven rehabilitation workers also appeared at various times. 



46 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



The 25 guests in 1952 who have made their ''Comeback" rep- 
resented nine different disability groups and 21 job objectives; all 
but three had made use of the various services that are available 
through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. The eight em- 
ployers were men who have learned in their own plants that handi- 
capped workers when properly placed are just as capable, just as 
reliable, and just as safe as the physically normal. 

In planning the over-all strategy of the program, an attempt has 
been made to give a dignified dramatization to means used to re- 
habilitate these handicapped people. The slogan used is: ''It's 
not what you have lost that counts, but what you have left." 

The different services dramatized have been college training, 
employment training, trade training, surgery, and the provision of 
artificial appliances. Different specialists emphasized the intimate 
nagging, perplexing, and interesting personal problems experienced 
by these courageous persons in making their comeback. 

Persons with a variety of disabilities, such as paraplegic, 
blindness, disabled arm and leg, amputee, and double amputee, have 
appeared; and they are holding a wide range of jobs, including teach- 
er, minister, florist, artificial appliance manufacturer, bacteriologist, 
and watch repairman. 

A paraplegic received physical restoration and college training 
and is now teaching in a school for handicapped children. A young 
man whose legs were amputated by a streetcar was furnished with 
artificial legs and employment training, learned to manufacture 
artificial legs, and is now manager of a branch office of a national 
agency. A young lady, a polio victim with disabled legs, received 
training in bacteriology through the rehabilitation service and after 
working for 8 years in Maryland became a medical missionary to 
India. A man in his early thirties whose below-knee amputation was 
caused by a public accident was furnished with an artificial leg and 
given training on the job as a florist; he now owns and operates his 
own florist plant and shop. 

Full-time Counselor Trained to Rehabilitate Mental Cases 

The Division completed its plan to develop the program for re- 
habilitating increased numbers of patients discharged from the 
mental hospitals. During the year one general counselor was as- 
signed to devote the major portion of his time to this group of in- 
dividuals. He spent one day each week at one of the hospitals, 
interviewing with the hospital staff clients who were being considered 
for parole and return to employment. Together they discussed the 
cases and the counselor selected those eligible for vocational re- 
habilitation on the basis of such group study. The problems of these 
people are twofold: one, adjustment in returning to community life; 
and two, adjustment to preparation for and returning to an old job, 
or entering upon a new work experience. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



Since the matter of developing an understanding of these people 
and an insight into their peculiar problems requires specialized train- 
ing and experience, the counselor undertaking this new assignment 
had to grow into it gradually and slowly. As a result of his ex- 
perience, the Division felt it was ready to assign this counselor to a 
full-time job in rehabilitating mental patients. 

The appointment of an experienced rehabilitation counselor by 
the Department of Mental Hygiene to co-ordinate the various 
therapy services in the various mental institutions of the State and to 
act as liaison in the hospitals to work out referrals of rehabilitation 
clients helped the Division in perfecting its plan to work more in- 
tensively on this type of handicap. 



Maryland Host to Region III, N.R.A. 

The entire rehabilitation staff co-operated with Region III of 
the National Rehabilitation Association — comprising North Carolina, 
District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland — in 
organizing a conference on *The Mental and Emotional Aspects of 
Rehabilitation." The conference devoted one day each to the prob- 
lems of tuberculosis, hearing and speech, blindness, and cardiac dis- 
abilities. Another day was devoted to a discussion of ''Co-ordina- 
tion of Community Resources for the Mentally Handicapped." The 
conference was conducted on the pattern of a panel, with a specialist 
representing different aspects of the same area. Most all of the 
agencies in the State that work with the handicapped co-operated in 
attending these groups and participating in them. 



Frostburg Workshop 

The rehabihtation staff conducted a Workshop at the Frost- 
burg State Teachers College to work on special rehabilitation prob- 
lems of the counselors' case study. The supervisors and counselors 
led the discussion in the Workshop. 

One of the most significant days of the Workshop was the one 
devoted to ''Working with Co-operating Agencies." The agencies 
represented were as follows: Maryland School for the Deaf, The 
Maryland Society for Crippled Children, State Industrial Accident 
Commission, Maryland Tuberculosis Association, State Department 
of Public Welfare, State Department of Health, and Board of 
Education of Allegany County. 

The program included the following topics: Techniques of 
Sound Casework, Rehabilitation of the Mentally Retarded, The Use 
of Rehabilitation Literature in the Field, Reports on Master's 
Theses, Working with Co-operating Agencies, Physical Restoration, 



48 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



Workmen's Compensation Cases, and Business Enterprise Equip- 
ment. 

The Division continued throughout the year to strengthen and 
improve its working relations with the State Industrial Accident 
Commission, the Maryland Society for Crippled Children and its 
various affiliates, the Maryland Tuberculosis Association, Goodwill 
Industries, the State Departments of Health, Welfare, and Employ- 
ment Service, the Workshop and the School for the Blind, and other 
agencies. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



TABLE 1 — Opening and Closing Dates: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1952 





Date of 


Date of 




Date of 


Date of 




Opening 


Closing 




Opening 


Closing 


County 


Schools, 


Schools, 


County 


Schools, 


Schools, 




September, 


June, 




September, 


June, 




1951 


1952 




1951 


1962 


Baltimore City 


5 


13 


Harford 


10 
6 


13 






Howard 


13 


Allegany 


6 


13 


Kent 


5 


6 


Anne Arundel 


7 


13 


Montgomery 


10 


13 


Baltimore 


10 
6 


20 
6 


Prince George's 


10 


16 
6 


Calvert 


Queen Anne's 


4 


Caroline 


5 


6 


St. Mary's 


10 


13 


Carroll 


4 


13 
6 


Somerset 


4 


May 30 
6 


Cecil 


6 


Talbot 


5 


Charles 


6 


11 


Washington 


10 


11 
6 


Dorchester 


10 


12 


Wicomico 


5 




5 


11 


Worcester 


4 


3 


Garrett 


6 


13 









TABLE 2 — Number Public Schools in Session Less than 180 Days: Counties of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days 



Yeab or 










County 


Total 


Three-Teacher 


Graded 


Separate 




Number 


Elementary 


Elementary 


High Schools 



WHITE SCHOOLS 



1951 










1952 


5 


1 


4 




Anne Arundel 






la 




Caroline 


1 




Id 




Somerset 


1 




lb 




Washingrton 


2 


' la 


lb 





COLORED SCHOOLS 



1951 


3 






3 


1952 


2 




" 2 




Charles 


1 




Ic 




Prince George's 


1 




le 





a, 179 days; b, 178 days; c, 177 days; d, 176 days; e, 172 days. 



50 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Eefort 



TABLE 3 — Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: Public and Nonpublic — by Color: 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total j White 


Colored 



ENROLLMENT 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


464,240 


380,415 


83,825 


317,556 


258,213 


59,343 


146,684 


122,202 


24,482 


Baltimore City 


169,320 


122,658 


46,662 


121,662 


87,176 


34,486 


47,658 


35,482 


12,176 


Total Countiest 


294,920 


257,757 


37,163 


195.894 


171,037 


24,857 


99,026 


86,720 


12,306 


Public* 




















Total State 


386,724 


305,650 


81,074 


253,061 


196,258 


56,803 


133,663 


109,392 


24,271 


Baltimore City 


128,682 


83,695 


44,987 


88,381 


55,392 


32,989 


40,301 


28,303 


11,998 


Total Countiest 


258,042 


221,955 


36,087 


164,680 


140,866 


23,814 


93,362 


81,089 


12,273 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


77,516 


74,765 


2,751 


64,495 


61,955 


2,540 


13,021 


12,810 


211 




40,638 


38,963 


1,675 


33,281 


31,784 


1,497 


7,357 


7,179 


178 




36,878 


35,802 


1,076 


31,214 


30,171 


1,043 


5,664 


5,631 


33 



TEACHING STAFF 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


16,229 


13,457 


2,772 














Baltimore City 


5,750 


4,269 


1,481 














Total Countiest 


10,479 


9,188 


1,291 














Public 




















Total State 


13,358 


10,691 


2,667 


7,462 


5,809 


1,653 


5,896 


4,882 


1,014 




4,316 


2,904 


1,412 


2,577 


1,623 


954 


1,739 


1,281 


458 


Total Countiest 


9,042 


7,787 


1,255 


4,885 


4,186 


699 


4,157 


3,601 


556 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


2,871 


2,766 


105 
















1,434 


1,365 


69 














Total Counties 


1,437 


1,401 


36 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


*1,278 


*987 


*291 


1,137 


869 


268 


289 


244 


45 


Baltimore City 


*276 


*206 


*70 


240 


179 


61 


56 


46 


10 


Total Countiest 


*1,002 


*781 


*221 


897 


690 


207 


233 


198 


35 


Public 




















Total State 


*940 


*668 


*272 


822 


571 


251 


219 


177 


42 




*160 


*101 


*59 


129 


78 


51 


35 


27 


8 


Total Countiest 


*780 


*567 


*213 


693 


493 


200 


184 


150 


34 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


*338 


*319 


*19 


315 


298 


17 


70 


67 


3 


Baltimore City 


*116 


*105 


*11 


111 


101 


10 


21 


19 


2 




*222 


*214 


*8 


204 


197 


7 


49 


48 


1 



For basic data see TABLES I, II, V, and X. 
* Excludes duplicates. 

t Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



CHART 1 

Enrollment in Public Schools by Color: Counties of Maryland and 
Baltimore City: 1923-1952 



150 



125' 



100 



75 



50 



25 



















/ 
/ 
/ 

— / — 














/ 

# 

/ 

—A 














/ 
/ 






y 

y 

Co 


mties - Vhi 




















































Counties 


■ Colored 








^^'^ 




^ Baltim< 


.re City - C( 


lored 










['■I i-n^ 


1 1 1 1 


MM 


p-m- 


1 1 1 1 


WW 



1923 1923 1933 1938 1943 19A8 1953 



Year 



52 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 4-— Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools: State of Maryland: 1943-1952 



Year 


Total 


PUBLlct 


Nonpublic 


Ending 


















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore | Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 1 Counties 

i 



GRAND TOTAL 



1943 


354,204 


153,118 


201,086 


300,067 


117,229 


182,838 


54,137 


35,889 


18,248 


1944 


352,690 


152,218 


200,472 


296,984 


115,898 


181,086 


55,706 


36,320 


19,386 


1945 


354,210 


151,036 


203,174 


296,754 


113,821 


182,933 


57,456 


37,215 


20,241 


1946 


356,895 


150,055 


206,840 


297,590 


112,551 


185,039 


59,305 


37,504 


21,801 


1947 


363.103 


150,943 


212,160 


301,173 


113,149 


188,024 


61,930 


37,794 


24,136 


1948 


375,391 


154,450 


220,941 


310,149 


115,725 


194,424 


65,242 


38,725 


26,517 


1949 


390,867 


156,704 


234,163 


323,403 


117,476 


205,927 


67,464 


39,228 


28,236 


1950 


413,731 


161,075 


252,656 


343,923 


121,365 


222,558 


69,808 


39,710 


30,098 


1951 


441,005 


165,136 


275,869 


367,532 


124,948 


242.584 


73,473 


40,188 


33,285 


1952 


464,240 


169,320 


294,920 


386,724 


128,682 


258,042 


77,516 


40,638 


36,878 



TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



1943 


277,274 


125,333 


151,941 


233,275 


95,149 


138,126 


43,999 


30,184 


13,815 


1944 


278,916 


125,751 


153,165 


233,887 


95,565 


138,322 


45.029 


30,186 


14,843 


1945 


279,436 


124,062 


155,374 


233,278 


93.472 


139,806 


46,158 


30,590 


15,568 


1946 


250,226 


108,823 


141,403 


$202,482 


78,168 


124,314 


47,744 


30,655 


17,089 


1947 


251,821 


108,906 


142,915 


201,803 


77,725 


124,078 


50,018 


31,181 


18,837 


1948 


261,225 


111,486 


149,739 


208,505 


80,069 


128,436 


52,720 


31,417 


21,303 


1949 


273,038 


113,904 


159,134 


218,173 


81,872 


136,301 


54,865 


32,032 


22,833 


1950 


287,879 


116,996 


170,883 


230,315 


84,401 


145,914 


57,564 


32,595 


24,969 


1951 


302,040 


119,056 


182,984 


241,106 


86,019 


155,087 


60,934 


33,037 


27,897 


1952 


317,556 


121,662 


195,894 


253,061 


88,381 


164,680 


64 495 


33,281 


31,214 



TOTAL HIGH 



1943 


76,930 


27,785 


49,145 


66,792 


22,080 


44,712 


10,138 


5,705 


4,433 


1944 


73,774 


26,467 


47,307 


63,097 


20,333 


42,764 


10,677 


6.134 


4,543 


1945 


74,774 


26,974 


47,800 


63,476 


20,349 


43,127 


11,298 


6,625 


4,673 


1946 


106,669 


41,232 


65,437 


t95,108 


34,383 


60,725 


11,561 


6,849 


4,712 


1947 


111,282 


42,037 


69,245 


99,370 


35,424 


63,946 


11,912 


6,613 


5,299 


1948 


114,166 


42,964 


71,202 


101,644 


35,656 


65,988 


12,522 


7,308 


5,214 


1949 


117,829 


42,800 


75,029 


105,230 


35,604 


69,626 


12,599 


7,196 


5,403 


1950 


125,852 


44,079 


81,773 


113,608 


36,964 


76,644 


12,244 


7,115 


5,129 


1951 


138,965 


46,080 


92,885 


126,426 


38,929 


87,497 


12,539 


7,151 


5,388 


1952 


146,684 


47,658 


99.026 


133,663 


40,301 


93,362 


13,021 


7,357 


5.664 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools 

X Grades 7 and 8 were included in the high school beginning in 1946; at this same time the change from an 
eleven-year to a twelve-year system was begun in the public schools of nineteen counties. 
For enrollment detail, see TABLES II. III. IV. and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



TABLE 5 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: State of Maryland: 

1943-1952 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICt 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















JXJNE 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total* 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL WHITE 



1943 


291 ,117 


118 ,800 


172 ,317 


239 ,090 


84 ,389 


154 ,701 


52 ,027 


34,411 


17,616 


1944 


289 ,331 


117 ,414 


171 ,917 


235 ,867 


82 ,709 


153 ,158 


53 ,464 


34 ,705 


18 ,759 


1945 


289 ,402 


115 ,289 


174,113 


234,054 


79 ,552 


154,502 


55 ,348 


35 ,737 


19 ,611 


1946 


290 ,037 


113 ,021 


177 ,016 


232 ,959 


77 ,086 


155 ,873 


57 ,078 


35 ,935 


21 ,143 


1947 


293 ,926 


112 ,648 


181 ,278 


234 ,463 


76 ,471 


157 ,992 


59 ,463 


36 ,177 


23 ,286 


1948 


303 ,912 


114,688 


189 ,224 


241 ,251 


77 ,702 


163 ,549 


62 ,661 


36,986 


25 ,675 


1949 


317 ,344 


116 ,220 


201 ,124 


252 ,463 


78 ,762 


173 ,701 


64 ,881 


37 ,458 


27 ,423 


1950 


336 ,196 


118,071 


218,125 


269 ,070 


80,140 


188 ,930 


67 ,126 


37 ,931 


29 ,195 


1951 


360 ,258 


120 ,646 


239 ,612 


289 ,473 


82,165 


207 ,308 


70 ,785 


38 ,481 


32 ,304 


1952 


380 ,415 


122 ,658 


257 ,757 


305 ,650 


83 ,695 


221 ,955 


74 ,765 


38 ,963 


35 ,802 



WHITE ELEMENTARY 



1943 


223 ,216 


94 ,780 


128 ,436 


181 ,157 


65 


,904 


115 ,253 


42 ,059 


28 ,876 


13 ,183 


1944 


224 ,325 


94 ,497 


129 ,828 


181 ,294 


65 


,708 


115 ,586 


43 ,031 


28 ,789 


14 ,242 


1945 


223 ,858 


92 ,309 


131 ,549 


179 ,580 


62 


,969 


116,611 


44 ,278 


29 ,340 


14 ,938 


1946 


198,358 


79 ,779 


118,579 


152 ,630 


50 


,482 


102,148 


45 ,728 


29 ,297 


16,431 


1947 


199 ,229 


79 ,458 


119 ,771 


151 ,491 


49 


,707 


101 ,784 


47 ,738 


29 ,751 


17 ,987 


1948 


207 ,227 


80 ,947 


126 ,280 


156 ,863 


51 


,073 


105 ,790 


50 ,364 


29 ,874 


20 ,490 


1949 


217 ,916 


82 ,871 


135 ,045 


165 ,402 


52 


,406 


112 ,996 


52 ,514 


30 ,465 


22 ,049 


1950 


230 ,659 


84 ,335 


146 ,324 


175,502 


53 


,280 


122 ,222 


55 ,157 


31 ,055 


24 ,102 


1951 


243 ,916 


85 ,689 


158 ,227 


185 ,451 


54 


,171 


131 ,280 


58 ,465 


31 ,518 


26 ,947 


1952 


258 ,213 


87 ,176 


171 ,037 


196 ,258 


55 


,392 


140 ,866 


61 ,955 


31 ,784 


30,171 



WHITE HIGH 



1943 


67 


,901 


24 


,020 


43 


,881 


57 


,933 


18 


,485 


39 ,448 


9,968 


5 


,535 


4 


,433 


1944 


65 


,006 


22 


,917 


42 


,089 


54 


,573 


17 


,001 


37 ,572 


10 ,433 


5 


,916 


4 


,517 


1945 


65 


,544 


22 


,980 


42 


,564 


54 


,474 


16 


,583 


37 ,891 


11 ,070 


6 


,397 


4 


,673 


1946 


91 


,679 


33 


,242 


58 


,437 


80 


,329 


26 


,604 


53 ,725 


11 ,350 


6 


,638 


4 


,712 


1947 


94 


,697 


33 


,190 


61 


,507 


82 


,972 


26 


,764 


56 ,208 


11 ,725 


6 


,426 


5 


,299 


1948 


96 


,685 


33 


,741 


62 


,944 


84 


,388 


26 


,629 


57 ,759 


12 ,297 


7 


,112 


5 


,185 


1949 


99 


,428 


33 


,349 


66 


,079 


87 


,061 


26 


,356 


60 ,705 


12 ,367 


6 


,993 


5 


,374 


1950 


105 


,537 


33 


,736 


71 


,801 


93 


,568 


26 


,860 


66 ,708 


11 ,969 




,876 


5 


,093 


1951 


116 


,342 


34 


,957 


81 


,385 


104 


,022 


27 


,994 


76 ,028 


12 ,320 


t 


,963 


5 


,357 


1952 


122 


,202 


35 


,482 


86 


,720 


109 


,392 


28 


,303 


81 ,089 


12 ,810 




,179 


5 


,631 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 



54 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 6 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: State of Maryland: 

1943-1952 



Year 
Ending 


Total 


PUBLICt 


Nonpublic 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total* 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL COLORED 



1943 


63 ,087 


34,318 


28 ,769 


60 


,977 


32 ,840 


28 ,137 


2,110 


1 


,478 


632 


1944 


63 ,359 


34 ,804 


28 ,555 


61 


,117 


33 ,189 


27 ,928 


2,242 


1 


,615 


627 


1945 


64 ,808 


35 ,747 


29 ,061 


62 


,700 


34 ,269 


28 ,431 


2,108 


1 


,478 


630 


1946 


66 ,858 


37 ,034 


29 ,824 


64 


,631 


35 ,465 


29 ,166 


2 ,227 


1 


,569 


658 


1947 


69 ,177 


38 ,295 


30 ,882 


66 


,710 


36 ,678 


30 ,032 


2 ,467 


1 


,617 


850 


1948 


71 ,479 


39 ,762 


31 ,717 


68 


,898 


38 ,023 


30 ,875 


2,581 


1 


,739 


842 


1949 


73 ,523 


40 ,484 


33 ,039 


70 


,940 


38 ,714 


32 ,226 


2,583 


1 


,770 


813 


1950 


77 ,535 


43 ,004 


34,531 


74 


,853 


41 ,225 


33 ,628 


2,682 


1 


,779 


903 


1951 


80 ,747 


44 ,490 


36 ,257 


78 


,059 


42 ,783 


35 ,276 


2,688 


1 


,707 


981 


1952 


83 ,825 


46 ,662 


37,163 


81 


,074 


44 ,987 


36 ,087 


2 ,751 


1 


,675 


1,076 



COLORED ELEMENTARY 



1943 


54 ,058 


30 ,553 


23 ,505 


52 ,118 


29 ,245 


22 


,873 


1 ,940 


1 


,308 


632 


1944 


54 ,591 


31 ,254 


23 ,337 


52 ,593 


29 ,857 


22 


,736 


1,998 


1 


,397 


601 


1945 


55 ,578 


31 ,753 


23 ,825 


53 ,698 


30 ,503 


23 


,195 


1 ,880 


1 


,250 


630 


1946 


51 ,868 


29 ,044 


22 ,824 


49 ,852 


27 ,686 


22 


,166 


2,016 


1 


,358 


658 


1947 


52 ,592 


29 ,448 


23 ,144 


50 ,312 


28 ,018 


22 


,294 


2,280 


1 


,430 


850 


1948 


53 ,998 


30 ,539 


23 ,459 


51 ,642 


28,996 


22 


,646 


2 ,356 


1 


,543 


813 


1949 


55 ,122 


31 ,033 


24 ,089 


52 ,771 


29 ,466 


23 


,305 


2,351 


1 


,567 


784 


1950 


57 ,220 


32 ,661 


24 ,559 


54 ,813 


31 ,121 


23 


,692 


2 ,407 


1 


,540 


867 


1951 


58 ,124 


33 ,367 


24 ,757 


55 ,655 


31 ,848 


23 


,807 


2,469 


1 


,519 


950 


1952 


59 ,343 


34 ,486 


24 ,857 


56 ,803 


32 ,989 


23 


,814 


2 ,540 


1 


,497 


1,043 



COLORED HIGH 



1943 


9 ,029 


3 ,765 


5,264 


8,859 


3 ,595 


5,264 


170 


170 




1944 


8,768 


3 ,550 


5,218 


8 ,524 


3 ,332 


5,192 


244 


218 


26 


1945 


9 ,230 


3 ,994 


5,236 


9 ,002 


3 ,766 


5 ,236 


228 


228 




1946 


14 ,990 


7 ,990 


7 ,000 


14 ,779 


7 ,779 


7 ,000 


211 


211 




1947 


16 ,585 


8,847 


7 ,738 


16 ,398 


8,660 


7 ,738 


187 


187 




1948 


17 ,481 


9 ,223 


8,258 


17 ,256 


9 ,027 


8,229 


225 


196 


29 


1949 


18 ,401 


9 ,451 


8,950 


18,169 


9 ,248 


8,921 


232 


203 


29 


1950 


20,315 


10 ,343 


9 ,972 


20 ,040 


10,104 


9 ,936 


275 


239 


36 


1951 


22 ,623 


11 ,123 


11 ,500 


22 ,404 


10 ,935 


11 ,469 


219 


188 


31 


1952 


24 ,482 


12 ,176 


12 ,306 


24 ,271 


11 ,998 


12,273 


211 


178 


33 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



TABLE 7 

Program for Education of Handicapped Children in Maryland 
Financed with State Funds: 1951-52 





Total 


Home Teaching 


Transportation 
TO Regular 
Classes 


Instruction in Special 
Schools 


County 












1 

Pupilsl Expendi- 
1 tures 

i 


Pupils 




Pupils 


Expendi- 
tures 


Pupils 


Teach- 
ers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Baltimore 
City Hos- 
pital 
Schools 


1 Expendi- 
Other 1 tures 
Schools 1 

1 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



*988 


$136,397.50 


361 


54,764.30 


*627 


81,633.20 


77 


4,901.70 


69 


6,783.86! 


*135 


23,409.031 


7 


479.54 


6 


579.41 


*20 


1,807.89 


13 


1,280.19 


8 


476.731 


12 


989.83 


13 


2,311.71 


6 


1,040.261 


22 


1,570.98 


22 


2,770.87, 


4 


129.101 


63 


13,595.98 


*74 


10,569.151 


5 


919.491 


9 


704.291 


10 


696.961 


5 


97.29 


20 


3,144.34 


16 


2,716.971 


11 


657.63; 



548 


201 


$57,572.49 


200 


11 


17,861.90 


348 


190 


39,710.59 


32 


11 


2,590.55 


39 


12 


3,691.03 


61 


24 


6,113.26 


3 


3 


479.54 


5 


5 


579.41 


12 


6 


1,338.91 


12 


12 


1,280.191 


4 


3 


429.13 


7 


4 


989.83 


6 


4 


1,711.71 


2 


2 


338.26 


14 


4 


1,508.14 


10 


5 


637.86 


2 


2 


129.10 


42 


26 


5,306.62 


55 


39 


6,457.64 


2 


3 


113.29 


5 


4 


670.69 


3 


5 


586.84 


1 


1 


97.29 


13 


1 


2,544.34 


10 


6 


1,459.33 


8 


8 


657.63 



$5,621.17 

1,246.18 

4,374.99 

1,543.15 
101.34 
469.41 



268.98 
' 47.60 



702.00 
62.84 



54.60 

717.51 
206.20 
33.60 
110.12 



57.64 



258 

123 

135 

18 
16 
25 
4 
1 



119 

29 

90 

2 
13 
41 



17 



1 I 600.00 

2 I 1,200.00 



* Total number of pupils excludes one duplicate in both home teaching and transportation in each of the follow- 
ing counties: Baltimore, Carroll, and Prince George's. 

t Includes $44,564.26 spent from Funds for Handicapped Children to send 84 children to special schools. 

i Includes $22,431.22 paid by State toward the salaries for the instruction of 258 children in Baltimore City Hospital 
schools, of whom 123 were from Baltimore City and 135 from the counties. 
Note: These pupils are in addition to those reported in special classes in TABLES 17 and IS 



56 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 8 

Special Classes and Highwood School: Baltimore 
Semester Ending June 30, 1952 



City: 





Number of 




Average 


Per Cent of 


Kind of Class 


Classes 


Net Roll 


Net Roll 


Attendance 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 



Total and Average 


26 


402 


399 


88.8 


Orthopedic 


12 


223 


221 


86.0 




3 


41 


39 


91.9 


Hearing Conservation 


3 


31 


32 


91.0 


Deaf 


5 


45 


44 


86.0 


Mixed* 


3 


62 


63 


89.0 


PHYSICALLY 


HANDICAPPED COLORED 


PUPILS 




Total and Average 


10 


159 


157 


85.4 


Orthopedic 


5 


93 


92 


86.0 


Sight Conservation 


3 


46 


45 


86.7 


Hearing Conservation 


1 


11 


11 


86.0 


Deaf 


1 


9 


9 


83.0 



SOCIALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 



Highwood School . 



51 



50 



78.5 



MENTALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 



Total and Average 


95 


1,778 


1,820 


78.2 




58 


1,109 


1,101 


82.5 


Shop Center 


37 


669 


719 


73.8 



MENTALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


91 


1,735 


1,753 


77.4 


Opportunity 


52 


1,060 


1,052 


81.6 




39 


676 


701 


78.2 



* Junior high school classes consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: orthopedic, 39; sight, 7; 
cardiac, 3; deaf, 5; and hearing, 8. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



TABLE 9 — Number of Pupils Enrolled*: Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children: Year Ending June 30, 1952 





Enrollment 


Total 
Number of 


Name and Location 


Kinder- 
garten 


Ele- 
mentary 


Secondary 


Special 


Different 
Teachers 



WHITE 



Children's House, Inc., Bethesda 








10 


3 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 












Cockeysville 








69 


10 


Child Study Center, Baltimore 








26 


4 


Friendly School, Baltimore 








7 


2 










9 


3 


Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 


12 


si 


34 




19 


Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick 


20 


107 


20 




18 


Maryland Training School for Boys, 












Loch Raven 




554 


82 




10 


Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown 




70 


31 




12 


Nursery School for Cerebral Palsy, Baltimore 








32 


4 


Reinhardt School for Deaf, Kensington 








30 


2 


Rosewood State Training School, 














28 


123 






11 


School of Chimes, Baltimore 








ie 


5 


Sunny Day School, Bethesda 








10 


2 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 








18 


5 



COLORED 



Barrett School for Girls, Glen Burnie 




132 






10 


Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., 












Cheltenham 




184 






8 


Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 


2 


26 






6 


Dept. for Colored Deaf 


11 


35 


i 




10 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



58 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 10— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1942-1951 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 



Resident Births in Maryland 



1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . , 

Total Counties . . , 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick .... 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico .... 
Worcester .... 



44,154 47,353 43,763 



19,720 

24,434 

1,912 
1,831 
4,749 
258 
348 
750 
570 
616 
514 
1,124 
490 
1,140 
414 
251 
2,666 
2,758 
256 
454 
362 
344 
1,562 
657 
408 



21,054 

26,299 

1,920 
1,932 
5,489 
317 
381 
758 
757 
661 
491 
1,183 
504 
1,168 
470 
259 
2,773 
3,131 
248 
540 
393 
323 
1,562 
653 
386 



42,816 50,733 



18,830 
24,933 



1,857 

5,112 
280 
349 
667 
682 
628 
482 

1,087 
464 

1,171 
420 
300 

2,674 

2,984 
239 
569 
374 
330 

1,504 
671 
400 



17,848 

24,968 

1,724 
1,819 
5,174 
312 
329 
708 
702 
605 
462 
1,141 
424 
1,090 
381 
246 
2,694 
2,992 
260 
708 
357 
330 
1,467 
636 
407 



21,111 

29,622 

2,257 
2,164 
6,140 
313 
387 
860 
804 
672 
526 
1,405 
515 
1,245 
477 
295 
3,073 
3,804 
269 
679 
414 
363 
1,730 
741 
489 



56,827 

23,992 

32,835 

2,554 
2,474 
6,867 
361 
405 
978 
788 
686 
613 
1,478 
568 
1,385 
565 
327 
3,411 
3,996 
289 
736 
484 
425 
1,989 
875 
581 



54,092 54,048 55,992 



22,083 

32,009 

2,160 
2,603 
6,375 
395 
420 
887 
790 
723 
574 
1,339 
551 
1,353 
546 
293 
3,600 
4,243 
313 
781 
432 
415 
1,791 
892 
533 



21,496 

32,552 

2,009 
2,655 
6,379 
366 
373 
849 
763 
723 
555 
1,377 
541 
1,379 
542 
299 
4,000 
4,563 
326 
824 
417 
418 
1,760 
866 
568 



21,382 

34,610 

1,803 
2,873 
6,661 
400 
417 
771 
756 
746 
559 
1,342 
530 
1,419 
569 
313 
4,740 
5,508 
311 
883 
436 
427 
1,697 
894 
555 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



TABLE 11 — White and Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1942-1951 

Data from Bureau Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Resident Births In Maryland 



County 
























1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 



WHITE 



Total State 


35,911 


38,749 


35,554 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


47,992 


Baltimore City. . . . 


15,076 


16,077 


14,021 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


14,938 


Total Counties .... 


20,835 


22,672 


21,533 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


27,671 


29,431 


33,054 


Allegany 


1,871 


1,887 


1,665 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


1,792 


Anne Anindel . . . 


1,360 


1,487 


1,442 


1,392 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


2,322 


Baltimore 


4,501 


5,155 


4,862 


4,751 


5,643 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


6,932 


Calvert 


115 


147 


116 


156 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 


160 




250 


283 


265 


248 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 


300 


Carroll 


686 


716 


626 


666 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 


778 




521 


698 


638 


652 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 


737 


Charles 


343 


382 


341 


304 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


397 


Dorchester 


327 


318 


318 


298 


360 


412 


368 


324 


317 


350 




1,009 


1,067 


979 


1,029 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


1,304 




490 


504 


464 


424 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 


507 


Harford 


1,042 


1,081 


1,059 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 


1,426 




346 


383 


354 


317 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


480 


Kent 


155 


156 


210 


166 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


204 


Montgomery . . . 


2,443 


2,543 


2,459 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


5,122 


Prince George's . 


2,276 


2,672 


2,532 


2,529 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


6,157 


Queen Anne's . . . 


164 


177 


170 


178 


196 


208 


213 


211 


200 


197 


St. Mary's 


282 


336 


388 


540 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 


690 




218 


217 


209 


199 


256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


226 


Talbot 


196 


216 


210 


220 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


281 


Washington .... 


1,523 


1,530 


1,479 


1,451 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 


1,684 




482 


492 


501 


471 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


686 




235 


225 


246 


231 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 


322 



COLORED 



Total State , 



Baltimore City . . . 

Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. , 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles , 

Dorchester . . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . , 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's . . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester . . . . , 



8,243 


8,604 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


13,089 


4,644 


4,977 


4,809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


7,692 


3,599 


3,627 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


5,179 


5,397 


41 


33 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


32 


471 


445 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


647 


248 


334 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


613 


625 


557 


143 


170 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 


245 


98 


98 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


96 


64 


42 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


40 


49 


59 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


64 


273 


279 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


385 


187 


173 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


280 


115 


116 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


160 


98 


87 


li2 


96 


112 


3 

141 


1 

167 


177 


1 

178 


219 


68 


87 


66 


64 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


117 


96 


103 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


81 


223 


230 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


356 


482 


459 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


863 


92 


71 


69 


82 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


101 


172 


204 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


226 


144 


176 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


206 


148 


107 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


154 


39 


32 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 


30 


175 


161 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 


294 


173 


161 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 


243 



60 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 12— Per Cent of Attendance: Maryland Elementary Schools*: 
Years Ending June 30, 1951 and 1952 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schooi^ 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 




91 


.9 


90 


3 


89 


8 


89.1 


Baltimore City 


89 


.6 


87 


6 


88 


6 


88.2 


County Average 


92 


.8 


91 


4 


91 


3 


90.2 




95 


.5 


94 





96 


6 


96.0 




92 


.0 


90 


8 


91 


8 


89.5 


Baltimore 


92 


.1 


90 


7 


90 


7 


89.8 


Calvert 


91 




91 


2 


88 


.2 


88.3 


Caroline 


95 


•1 


94 


5 


93 


8 


93.5 


Carroll 


94 


2 


92 


8 


90 


.8 


90.1 


Cecil 


91 


6 


89 


9 


90 


6 


88.9 




91 


4 


90 


2 


87 


5 


86.5 


Dorchester 


94 


8 


93 


9 


92 


8 


90.4 


Frederick 


93 


4 


91 


9 


90 


8 


89.7 


Garrett 


92 


6 


91 


5 










92 


1 


89 


8 


9i 


8 


96.7 


Howard 


93 





91 


5 


89 


9 


90.2 


Kent 


94 


1 


93 


6 


93 


1 


93.6 


Montgomery 


91 


6 


90 


6 


90 





87.2 


Prince George's 


92 


8 


91 


6 


92 




91.0 




93 


3 


92 


4 


95 


7 


95.6 


St. Mary's 


91 




90 


8 


87 


9 


88.5 


Somerset 


94 


1 


91 


9 


92 


7 


92.9 


Talbot 


94 


7 


93 


2 


96 


2 


93.6 


Washington 


94 





91 


3 


93 


9 


91.1 




92 




92 


2 


92 


4 


91.7 


Worcester 


92 




91 


4 


90 


7 


90.9 



* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 
For attendance by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



TABLE 13 — Per Cent of Attendance by Type of White Elementary School: 
Counties of Maryland: Years Ending June 30, 1951 and 1952 





Schools Having 


Schools Having 


Schools Having 








One-Teacher 


Two-Teacher 


Three-Teacher 


Graded 




Organization 


Organization 


Organization 


Schools* 


County 






































1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 




93.4 


92.6 


93.3 


92.5 


94.2 


92.7 


92.7 


91.3 








97.0 


95.8 


98.0 


95.4 


95.4 


93.9 


Anne Arundel 






93.7 


88.0 


92.3 


90.5 


92.0 


90.8 


Baltimore 






90.2 






90.1 


92.1 


90.7 


Calvert 






91.9 


93 ".7 


94.3 


94.2 


91.5 


90.7 


Caroline 






94.8 


94.7 




91.9 


95.2 


94.6 


Carroll 






95.6 


94.5 






94.2 


92.8 


Cecil 


94 '.7 


93.1 


90.0 


88.5 






91.5 


89.6 


Charles 














91.4 


90.2 


Dorchester 


95.6 


93.8 


94.3 


94.6 


94.6 


93.6 


94.8 


93.8 


Frederick 


95.1 


94.5 


90.9 


90.6 


93.8 


92.1 


93.5 


92.0 


Garrett 


91.9 


90.6 


93.0 


92.1 


93.9 


92.1 


92.6 


91.4 


Harford 


95.1 


94.4 


93.7 


92.0 


92.0 


92.0 


92.0 


89.5 




94.2 




91.2 


88.4 






93.0 


91.6 


Kent 






94.4 


94.6 






94.0 


93.3 


Montgomery 


89 ".i 


9i".i 


93.0 


91.7 


93.9 


9i'.5 


91.5 


90.6 


Prince George's 


96.9 


93.6 


93.9 


92.4 


95.3 


93.0 


92.7 


91.6 




92.8 


95.1 


93.3 


93.1 


94.5 


93.7 


93.1 


92.0 


St. Mary's 


93.4 


94.8 


91.8 


91.8 


92.3 




90.2 


90.4 


Somerset 


95.0 


94.6 


93.7 


91.9 




94.5 


94.4 


91.7 


Talbot 


95.0 


97.3 


95.6 


94.1 


95.3 


93.3 


94.6 


93.0 


Washington 


93.1 


92.0 


93.7 


93.4 


94.7 


93.5 


94.0 


91.7 


Wicomico [ 






93.9 


92.2 


93.6 


92.9 


92.8 


92.2 


Worcester 

t 






94.3 


93.3 


94.8 




91.9 


91.2 



Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



62 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 14 — Index of School Attendance: Maryland County Elementary Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1952 





White Schools 




Colored 


Schools 


County 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 




Attendance 


Late 


With- 


Attendance 


Late 


With- 








Entrants! 


drawalsj 


* 




Entrantst 


dra waist 


County Average 


91 


.4 


0.1 


0.4 


90 


2 


1 


.1 


0.4 


Allegany 


94 


.0 


0.1 


0.5 


96 













90 


.8 


0.1 


0.4 


89 


5 


'o 


.9 


'6'.5 




90 


.7 


0.1 


0.2 


89 


8 





.9 


0.3 


Calvert 


91 


.2 




0.4 


88 


3 


2 


.5 


0.4 


Caroline 


94 


.5 




0.4 


93 


5 





.5 


0.2 


Carroll 


92 


.8 


'o'.2 


0.5 


90 


1 





.4 




Cecil 


89 


.9 


0.1 


0.5 


88 


9 


4 


.4 


'6".3 


Charles 


90 


.2 


0.5 


0.7 


86 


5 


4 


.6 


0.5 


Dorchester 


93 


.9 


0.1 


0.2 


90 


4 





.5 


0.3 


Frederick 


91 


9 




0.3 


89 


7 






0.1 


Garrett 


91 


5 




0.2 












Harford 


89 


8 


0.2 


0.4 


90 


7 





3 


o'.i 




91 


5 


0.4 


0.6 


90 


2 


2 


1 


0.2 


Kent 


93 


6 




0.5 


93 


6 





4 


0.2 


Montgomery 


90 


6 


o'.i 


0.5 


87 


2 


1 


2 


0.3 


Prince George's 


91 


6 


a 


0.2 


91 








4 


0.3 




92 


4 




0.1 


95 


6 








St. Mary's 


90 


8 


0.6 


0.2 


88 


5 


2 


7 


0.7 


Somerset 


91 


9 


0.1 


0.6 


92 


9 


1 


2 


0.4 


Talbot 


93 


2 




0.1 


93 


6 


1 


1 


0.5 


Washington 


91 


3 


a 


0.8 


91 


1 










92 


2 


a 


0.7 


91 


7 





i 


0.6 


Worcester 


91 


4 




0.4 


90 


9 





4 


0.2 



Excludes elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 
* For per cent of attendance for all types of schools, see TABLE IX. 
t Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. 

X Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
a Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of EoycATiON 



63 



TABLE 15— Per Cent of Attendance: Maryland High Schools*: 
Years Ending June 30, 1951 and 1952 



County 


White Schools 


Colored 


Schools 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 


State Average 


92 


1 


91 





89 


.0 


86 .4 


Baltimore City 


91 


3 


89 


4 


88 


.2 


83.6 


County Average 


92 


4 


91 


6 


89 


8 


89.2 




95 


3 


94 


3 


95 


.9 


95.3 




91 


9 


91 


4 


87 


6 


86.6 




91 





90 


2 


91 


.4 


90.7 


Calvert 


91 


2 


91 


2 


89 


.8 


87.0 




93 


8 


94 


1 


92 


.8 


93.0 


Carroll 


94 





93 


5 


89 


.6 


88.8 


Cecil 


90 


5 


89 


8 


86 


.6 


86.0 


Charles 


91 


4 


90 


5 


87 


.9 


87.2 


Dorchester 


94 




92 


9 


93 


4. 


94.5 


Frederick 


92 




90 


9 


89 


5 


89.3 




91 





89 


7 








Harford 


92 


7 


91 


8 


9i 


5 


90.5 


Howard 


93 


4 


92 


5 


89 


1 


90.4 




92 


4 


92 


2 


91 


6 


92.1 




92 


7 


92 


7 


85 


4 


85.4 




92 





91 


1 


88 


7 


88.5 


Queen Anne's 


92 


1 


90 


2 


94 


2 


93.4 


St. Mary's 


90 


1 


89 


7 


85 


7 


86.1 




93 


8 


92 


5 


91 


4 


91.8 


Talbot 


93 


2 


92 


1 


92 


2 


89.4 




91 


7 


90 


9 


93 


7 


91.8 




94 


6 


93 


6 


91 


2 


90.5 


Worcester 


92 


6 


91 


2 


91 


.6 


90.5 



* Includes pupils in vocational schools. 



TABLE 16— Number Enrolled by Grade-Color-Sex: Maryland County Public 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Grade 


Grand Total 


White 


Colored 






















Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


248,567 


126,878 


121,689 


213,280 


109,054 


104,226 


35,287 


17,824 


17.463 


Kindergarten. . 


4,225 


2,164 


2,061 


4,110 


2,117 


1,993 


115 


47 


68 


1* 


27,161 


14,222 


12,939 


23,108 


12,077 


11,031 


4,053 


2,145 


1,908 


2 


26,563 


13,720 


12,843 


22,821 


11,743 


11,078 


3,742 


1,977 


1,765 


3 


27,426 


14,333 


13,093 


23,508 


12,219 


11,289 


3,918 


2,114 


1,804 


4 


25,682 


13,157 


12,525 


21,805 


11,193 


10,612 


3,877 


1,964 


1,913 


5 


23,131 


11,855 


11,276 


19,432 


9,935 


9,497 


3,699 


1,920 


1,779 


6 


21,547 


11,179 


10,368 


18,098 


9,384 


8,714 


3,449 


1,795 


1,654 


7 


20,577 


10,624 


9,953 


17,358 


9,042 


8,316 


3 219 


1,582 


1,637 


8 


19,596 


9,944 


9,652 


16,768 


8,638 


8,130 


2,828 


1,306 


1,522 


9 


17,273 


8,677 


8,596 


15,038 


7,609 


7,429 


2,235 


1,068 


1,167 


10 


14,234 


6,995 


7,239 


12,463 


6,140 


6,323 


1,771 


855 


916 


11 


11,456 


5,386 


6,070 


10,053 


4 768 


5,285 


1,403 


618 


785 


12t 


9,296 


4,345 


4,951 


8,318 


3,912 


4,406 


978 


433 


545 


Special Classes. . 


400 


277 


123 


400 


277 


123 









Enrollment excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. Also 

excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 
* Includes enrollment in junior first grade. 

t Includes 11 white (9 boys. 2 girls) and 1 colored (girl) postgraduates 



64 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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66 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 19 — Causes of Nonpromotion: Maryland County White Elementary 
Pupils*: by Year— 1943-1952; by County— Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Year 

County 



Total 
Not 
Promoted 



Per Cent op Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



o 



.2«« 



=65 



BY YEAR 



1942-43 


11,255 


10.3 


1.1 


1.3 





2 


0.6 


1.1 


3.9 


0.6 


1.5 


1943-44 


10,585 


9.8 


1.1 


1.0 





2 


0.5 


1.0 


4.0 


0.5 


1.5 


1944-45 


8,083 


7.3 


0.9 


0.9 





1 


0.4 


0.7 


2.8 


0.3 


1.2 


1945-46t 


4,852 


5.0 


0.6 


0.4 





1 


0.2 


0.5 


1.9 


0.3 


1.0 


1946-47t 


3,040 


3.1 


0.5 


0.2 





1 


0.1 


0.3 


1.2 


0.2 


0.5 


1947-48t 


3,027 


3.0 


0.4 


0.2 





1 


t 


0.4 


1.2 


0.2 


0.5 


1948-49t 


3,327 


3.1 


0.4 


0.2 





1 


t 


0.3 


1.2 


0.2 


0.7 


1949-50t 


3,003 


2.6 


0.4 


0.1 





1 


+ 
+ 


0.2 


1.0 


0.1 


0.7 


1950-51t 


3,011 


2.4 


0.3 


0.1 





1 


X 


0.2 


0.9 


0.1 


0.7 


1951-52t 


2,923 


2.2 


0.2 


0.1 





1 


X 


0.2 


0.8 


0.1 


0.7 



BY COUNTY 1951-52 



Allegany 


156 


2 








2 


0.1 


X 




X 


0.5 




1.2 


Anne Arundel 


397 


3 


9 





4 


0.2 


0.1 




0.1 


1.9 


0.2 


1.0 


Baltimore 


373 


1 


5 





2 


0.1 


X 






0.6 


X 


0.5 


Calvert 


13 


1 


5 





4 






0.1 


0.2 


0.2 


0.6 


Caroline 


92 


5 


7 





5 


o'.i 






0.9 


1.8 


0.3 


2.1 


Carroll 


107 


2 


4 





2 


0.2 






0.4 


1.0 


0.1 


0.5 


Cecil 


112 


3 


1 





4 


0.3 


o.i 




0.4 


1.0 


0.3 


0.6 


Charles 


57 


3 


1 





4 


0.1 






0.2 


0.5 


0.1 


1.8 


Dorchester 


33 


1 


7 












0.2 


0.9 


0.1 


0.5 


Frederick 


24 





4 





2 








X 


0.2 






Garrett 


50 


1 


7 





3 




o'.i 




0.4 


0.6 


X 


0'.2 




101 


1 


9 





3 


0".2 


0.1 




0.1 


0.9 


0.1 


0.2 




107 


4 


7 





3 


0.7 


0.3 




0.3 


2.2 


0.6 


0.3 


Kent 


68 


6 


2 





8 


0.4 






0.5 


2.5 


0.4 


1.6 


Montgomery 


385 


1 


8 





1 


0.1 


o'.i 


x' 


0.3 


0.5 


0.1 


0.6 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


443 


2 


4 





3 




0.1 


X 


0.2 


0.9 


0.2 


0.7 


41 


3 


4 





4 










2.1 


0.3 


0.6 


St. Mary's 


84 


6 


6 





6 


0.5 








1.2 


0.6 


3.7 


Somerset 


50 


3 


6 





4 


0.1 






O.i 


1.4 


0.2 


1.4 


Talbot 


31 


2 


2 






0.1 


o'.i 




0.1 


1.1 


0.1 


0.7 


Washington 


53 





6 







0.1 






0.1 


0.2 


X 


0.1 


Wicomico 


131 


3 


8 





4 






X 


1.0 


1.9 


0.2 


0.3 


Worcester 


15 


1 








1 








0.4 


0.2 




0.3 



* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

X Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



TABLE 20 — Causes for Nonpromotion: Maryland County Colored Elementary 
Pupils*: by Year— 1943-1952: by County— Year Ending June 30, 1952 









Per 


Cent 


OF 


Pupils Not 


Promoted 


BY 


Cause 




Year 


Total 
Not 








mdance 






> 




acity 


Home 

nd 

rest 


"o 

_ c 




County 


Promoted 




Tllnp 




SO 


ranci 







■tj 

<u 


acao 


Inte 


from 
Sch 


3 






1 


"r 
c 






Ent 


E 
2 


>, 


Q. 


la 


rtun 

iditic 
k of 


on *f 


es 
I-, 






< 


^ 




S' y 


Late 
1 


>^ S 


Menl 


Unfo 
Con 
Lac 


Tran 
Ano 


Othe 


BY YEAR 


1942-43 


3,891 


17.6 


1 


.5 


4 


.4 


0.3 


1 


.0 


0.9 


7 


5 


0.5 


1.5 


1943-44 


3,788 


17.2 


1 


.7 


4 


.2 


0.5 





.8 


0.9 


7 


3 


0.7 


1.1 


1944-45 


3,464 


15.2 


1 


.2 


3 


.8 


0.4 





.7 


0.8 


6 


8 


0.6 


0.9 


1945-46t 


2,491 


11.0 


1 


.2 


3 


.1 


0.3 





.4 


0.5 


4 


5 




1.0 


1946-47t 


2,043 


9.4 


1 





2 


.3 


0.3 





.3 


0.5 


4 


1 


0.3 


0.6 


1947-48t 


1,793 


8.2 





9 


1 


9 


0.3 





.3 


0.4 


3 


6 


0.2 


0.6 


194R-49t 


1,640 


7.2 





7 


1 


4 


0.2 





.1 


0.3 


3 


9 


0.3 


0.3 


1949-50t 


1,553 


6.7 





7 


1 


2 


0.1 


t 


0.2 


3 


7 


0.3 


0.5 


1950-51t 


1,385 


6.0 





5 


1 


1 


0.2 





.1 


0.2 


3 


1 


0.3 


0.4 


1951-52t 


1,456 


6.3 





5 


1 


2 


0.2 





.1 


0.2 


3 


6 


0.2 


0.3 


BY COUNTY 1951-52 


Allegany 


4 


2.5 
















0.6 




3 




0.6 


Anne Arundel 


350 


12.2 


1 


.1 


3 





0.3 






0.2 


6 


6 


0.3 


0.7 


Baltimore 


60 


2.4 





.2 





2 








0.1 


1 






0.3 


Calvert 


119 


11.5 





4 


1 


5 







.1 




8 


I 


0*7 




Caroline 


33 


5.9 





5 





9 










4 







0.5 


Carroll 


4 


1.5 






1 


1 













4 






Cecil 


8 


2.8 


















2 


4 




0'.4 


Charles 


159 


9.7 





8 


2 


9 


0.4 






0.4 


4 


8 


0.2 


0.2 


Dorchester 


41 


3.8 





3 












0.3 


2 


8 


0.1 


0.3 


Frederick 


4 


0.6 





1 

















5 






Garrett 






























Harford 


■47 


6'9 





2 


1 


3 










4 


8 


0.2 


0.4 


Howard 


24 


4.0 





2 


1 


8 


0.5 






0'2 


1 







0.3 


Kent 


30 


6.1 





6 





4 








0.2 


4 


1 




0.8 


Montgomery 


121 


7.4 





5 


1 


4 


0.2 





4 


0.3 


4 


2 


0.3 


0.1 


Prince George's . . . 


234 


6.9 





7 


1 





0.2 






0.2 


4 





0.3 


0.5 




4 


0.8 





2 

















4 




0.2 


St. Mary's 


58 


8.1 


1 





3 


9 


0.3 






0.3 


2 


5 




0.1 


Somerset 


39 


4.1 









8 


0.4 





i 


0.2 


2 


6 






Talbot 


36 


4.6 





4 





4 







1 


0.1 


2 


2 


0.4 


1.6 


Washington 






























Wicomico 


64 


5.3 





5 




■ 







i 


0.7 


3 


6 


0.4 




Worcester 


17 


1.7 





2 






o'.i 






0.2 





9 

1 


0.1 


0'2 



* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 194fi grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

X Less than 0.1 per cent 



68 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 21 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Maryland County Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



County 


White Schools 




Colored 


Schools 




First Grade 


Nonpromotions 


First Grade Nonpromotions 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


752 


394 


6.2 


3.6 


295 


194 


13.8 


10.2 


Allegany 


40 


19 


6.1 


3.0 


1 




7.7 






88 


54 


9.3 


6.8 


64 


38 


23.7 


15.5 




119 


56 


5.2 


2.7 


12 


11 


5.7 


5.4 


Calvert 


4 


4 


4.5 


5.1 


18 


15 


15.8 


18.3 


Caroline 


13 


7 


8.6 


5.3 


6 


2 


12.8 


4.7 


Carroll 


25 


20 


6.7 


5.5 


1 


2 


6.3 


6.7 


Cecil 


55 


22 


14.0 


7.0 


3 


1 


11.1 


3.6 




17 


5 


9.8 


3.1 


33 


19 


19.3 


12.4 


Dorchester 


10 


4 


6.1 


2.4 


6 


3 


7 .1 


4.0 


Frederick 


10 


7 


2.0 


1.6 










Garrett 


10 


8 


4.2 


3.8 












35 


11 


7.0 


2.4 


3 


2 


5.2 


4.3 




22 


17 


10.9 


9.3 


5 


8 


10.2 


14.8 


Kent 


10 


5 


10.1 


5.2 


7 


7 


15.9 


17.1 


Montgomery 


120 


49 


6.5 


2.8 


23 


23 


16.5 


16.4 


Prince George's 


106 


64 


5.8 


3.8 


59 


27 


17.5 


10.4 




4 


1 


3.6 


0.8 










St. Mary's 


19 


12 


12.7 


9.7 


ie 


8 


21.9 


13.6 


Somerset 


1 


4 


0.8 


3.3 


7 


5 


7.1 


6.9 


Talbot 


10 


4 


7.9 


3.3 


12 


9 


13.3 


13.6 




9 


9 


1.3 


1.5 






15.9 


8 '.9 


Wicomico 


16 


12 


6.4 


4.8 


i7 


9 




9 




5.9 




2 


5 


2.1 


5.3 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, but includes pupils 
in junior first grade. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 22 



Number and Per Cent of Maryland County Elementary^ 
November 30, 1947, 1949. 1951 



Pupils Over- Age: 



County 


Number Over-Age 1951 


Per Cent of Elementary Pupils Over-Age 


1947 


1949 


1951 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


WHITE 


Total Counties . . . 


2,447 


1,616 


831 


5.5 


3.2 


1.9 


2.4 


1.3 


Allegany 


99 


58 


41 


4.7 


2.7 


1.2 


1.4 


1.1 


Anne Arundel .... 


251 


165 


86 


6.8 


4.4 


2.5 


3.1 


1.7 


Baltimore 


310 


203 


107 


7.2 


2.8 


1.2 


1.6 


0.9 


Calvert 


18 


14 


4 


7.2 


4.4 


2.1 


3.1 


1.0 


Caroline 


51 


37 


14 


4.4 


2.2 


3.2 


4.6 


1.8 


Carroll 


116 


79 


37 


6.1 


3.5 


2.6 


3.4 


1.8 


Cecil 


122 


78 


44 


8.0 


6.2 


3.5 


4.3 


2.5 


Charles 


56 


32 


24 


8.8 


4.5 


3.1 


3.4 


2.7 


Dorchester 


29 


17 


12 


6.0 


3.0 


1.5 


1.7 


1.2 


Frederick 


41 


28 


13 


1.6 


1.1 


0.7 


1.0 


0.5 


Garrett 


113 


67 


46 


11.5 


8.4 


3.8 


4.4 


3.1 


Harford 


158 


103 


55 


8.9 


5.6 


2.9 


3.7 


2.0 


Howard 


150 


104 


46 


14.6 


8.3 


6.7 


8.9 


4.3 


Kent 


19 


8 


11 


4.8 


3.5 


1.8 


1.4 


2.1 


Montgomery 


216 


152 


64 


3.4 


1.8 


1.2 


1.7 


0.8 


Prince George's . . 


231 


160 


71 


2.8 


2.0 


1.2 


1.7 


0.8 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


44 


23 


21 


6.0 


4.5 


3.6 


3.7 


3.5 


St. Mary's 


64 


47 


17 


7.0 


6.3 


4.9 


6.9 


2.7 


Somerset 


67 


49 


18 


7.4 


5.6 


4.9 


7.0 


2.7 


Talbot 


29 


21 


8 


5.5 


3.6 


2.0 


2.8 


1.1 


Washington 


38 


25 


13 


0.7 


0.5 


0.5 


0.6 


0.3 


Wicomico 


187 


124 


63 


8.8 


6.8 


5.3 


6.9 


3.7 


Worcester 


38 


22 


16 


4.4 


5.0 


2.4 


2.7 


2.1 



COLORED 



Total Counties . . . 


2,030 


1,352 


678 


15 


1 


11 





8.7 


11.1 


6 


1 


Allegany 


2 


2 




7 


8 


3 


1 


1.3 


2.5 






Anne Arundel .... 


361 


245 


lie 


18 





15 


7 


12.6 


16.4 


8 


5 


Baltimore 


134 


85 


49 


21 


4 


11 


5 


5.2 


6.3 


4 





Calvert 


168 


116 


52 


24 


4 


^20 


9 


16.3 


20.2 


11 


4 


Caroline 


38 


28 


10 


9 


8 


9 


6 


6.8 


9.6 


3 


7 


Carroll 


13 


8 


5 


9 


8 


6 


.1 


4.8 


7.0 


3 


2 


Cecil 


19 


11 


8 


4 


3 


6 


4 


6.7 


7.9 


5 


6 


Charles 


243 


154 


89 


16 


4 


15 


.5 


15.0 


18.3 


11 


5 


Dorchester 


50 


35 


15 


6 


6 


4 


.1 


4.5 


6.3 


2 


7 


Frederick 


11 


9 


2 


1 


5 





.1 


1.6 


2.8 





6 


Garrett 
























Harford 


38 


24 


i4 


i 8 


.4 


5 


.3 


5 ".5 


6'.i 


4 


.6 


Howard 


62 


39 


13 


! 13 


.5 


13 


.0 


8.7 


12.8 


4 


.5 


Kent 


17 


9 


8 


9 


.8 


4 


.8 


3.4 


3.5 


3 


.3 


Montgomery 


149 


94 


55 


15 


.9 


11 


.5 


9.8 


12.5 


7 


.2 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


276 


188 


88 


16 


.6 


10 


.2 


7.9 


10.2 


5 


.3 


19 


8 


11 


6 


.9 


5 


.8 


4.0 


3.3 


4 


.7 


St. Mary's 


85 


56 


29 


15 


.4 


12 


.6 


11.9 


14.7 


8 


.7 


Somerset 


93 


63 


30 


16 


.0 


12 


.2 


9.9 


11.9 


7 


.3 


Talbot 


83 


57 


26 


19 


.6 


8 


.2 


10.8 


14.4 


7 


.0 


Washington 


4 


2 


2 


; 5 


.3 


3 


.8 


2.2 


1.9 


2 


.7 


Wicomico 


129 


89 


40 


12 


.0 


10 


.1 


10.4 


13.9 


6 


.7 


Worcester 


46 


30 


16 


11 


.0 


9 


.0 


4.6 


5.7 


3 


.4 



* Excludes pupils enrolled in elementary schools of State Teachers Collies. 



70 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 23 

Age — Grade Distribution of Maryland County Pupils Enrolled — November 1951 





Total 




Grade in Elementary School 




Grade in High ScROOLf 


AgeJ 


AU 


Total 






























Grades 


Ele- 














Total 


















men- 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


High 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 






tary 





























WHITE PUPILS 



5 and under .... 


6,884 


6,884 


6,877 


7 


























6 


21,372 


21,372 15,0351 6,331 


6 
























7 


21 ,645 


21 ,645 


1,066 


14,466 


6,082 


31 






















8 


23,187 


23,187 


66 


1,790 


14,953 


6,355 


23 




















9 


19,990 


19 ,990 


8 


164 


1,971 


12,854 


4,952 




















10 


18,081 


18,037 


3 


21 


278 


2,125 


11,281 


4,328 


1 


44 


44 












11 


16,875 


13,404 


1 


2 


41 


320 


2,493 


10,402 


145 


3,471 


3,419 


52 










12 


16,167 


3,437 






13 


70 


460 


2,494 


400 


12,730 


9,138 


3,544 


47 


1 






13 


15,789 


852 




i 




14 


97 


611 


129 


14,937 


2,839 


8,997 


3,053 


48 






14 


14,834 


227 








1 


21 


152 


53 


14,607 


872 


2,966 


8,072 


2,643 


54 




15 


13,527 


47 








1 


3 


24 


19 


13 ,480 


221 


1,037 


2,910 


6,961 


2,310 


41 


16 


10,506 


1 












1 




10,505 


15 


109 


693 


2,000 


5,589 


2,099 


17 


6,622 


1 












1 




6,621 




10 


66 


432 


1,529 


4,584 


18 


1,582 


















1,582 




1 


12 


36 


299 


1,234 


19 


266 


1 












'i 




265 






3 


6 


38 


218 


Over 19 


33 


















33 






3 


1 


6 


23 


Total Number . . 


207,360 


129,085 


23,056 


22 ,782 


23 ,344 


21,771 


19 ,330 


18,055 


747 


78,275 


16,548 


16,716 


14,859 


12,128 


9,825 


8,199 


Number over-age 


6,548 


2,447 


78 


188 


332 


406 


581 


790 


72 


4,101 


1,108 


1,157 


777 


475 


343 


241 


Percent over-age. 


3.1 


1.9 


.3 


.8 


1.4 


1.9 


3.0 


4.4 


9.6 


5.2 


6.7 


6.9 


5.2 


3.9 


3.5 


2.9 



COLORED PUPILS 



5 and under .... 


904 


904 


904 




























6 


3,425 


3,425 


2,661 


763 


1 
























7 


3,478 


3,478 


409 


2,287 


777 


5 






















8 


3,564 


3,564 


74 


560 


2,252 


664 


14 




















9 


3,465 


3,465 9 


141 


648 


2,086 


578 


3 


















10 


3,345 


3,332 


4 


24 


189 


753 


1,847 


515 




13 


13 












11 


3,286 


2,816 


2 


8 


48 


268 


753 


1,667 


70 


470 


450 


20 










12 


3,104 


1,384 




3 


16 


81 


366 


747 


171 


1,720 


1,233 


472 


14 


1 






13 


2,893 


590 


i 


1 


10 


23 


115 


361 


79 


2,303 


678 


1,264 


349 


12 






14 


2,554 


208 






2 


3 


55 


116 


32 


2,346 


324 


678 


1,025 


305 


14 




15 


2,252 


67 






1 


7 


22 


32 


5 


2,185 


135 


288 


595 


861 


300 


6 


16 


1,594 


10 












8 


2 


1,584 


20 


71 


180 


408 


689 


216 


17 


924 


1 












1 




923 


4 


5 


53 


114 


286 


461 


18 


312 


















312 






2 


21 


68 


221 


19 


76 


















76 






3 


4 


19 


50 


Over 19 


8 


















8 








1 




7 


Total number . . . 


35,184 


23 ,244 


4,064 


3,787 


3,944 


3,890 


3,750 


3,450 


359 


11,940 


2,857 


2,798 


2,221 


1,727 


1,376 


961 


Number over-age 


3,399 


2,030 


90 


177 


266 


382 


558 


518 


39 


1,369 


483 


364 


238 


140 


87 


57 


Percent over-age. 


9.7 


8.7 


2.2 


4.7 


6.7 


9.8 


14.9 


15.0 


10.9 


11.5 


16.9 


13.0 


10.7 


8.1 


6.3 


5.9 



* Excludes pupils in kindergarten, special classes, and elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes postgraduates. 
X Age September 1, 1951. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 24 



Age — Grade Distribution of Maryland County Boys Enrolled — November 1951 



AOEt 


Total 

AU 
Grades 


Gbade in Elementary School* 


Gba.de in High ScHOOLf 


Total 
Ele- 
men- 
tary 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total 
ffigh 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 



WHITE BOYS 



5 and under .... 


3,538 


3,538^ 3,536 


2 


























6 


11,018 


11,018 


7,875 


3,142 


1 
























7 


10,991 


10,991 


662 


7,352 


2,960 


17 
























11,844 


11,844 


40 


1,093 


7,696 


3,001 


14 




















I 


10,196 


10.196 


2 


101 


1,222 


6,563 


2,289 


19 


















10 


9,264 


9,246 


3 


13 


181 


1,332 


5,649 


2,068 




18 


is 












11 


8,593 


7,017, 


2 


25 


205 


1,542 


5.188 


55 


1,576 


1,550 


26 










12 


8,185 
8,082 


2,074 




10 


44 


308 


1,532 


180 


6,111 


4,515 


1.573 


22 


1 






13 


570 








12 


61 


420 


77 


7,512 


1 ,770 


4,399 


1,317 


26 






14 


7,522 


155 








1 


13 


112 


29 


7,367 


613 


1,779 


3,780 


1,164 


31 




15 


6,896 


31 










2 


15 


14 


6,865 


167 


710 


1,799 


3,238 


936 


15 


16 


5,139 


1 












1 


5,138 


11 


84 


482 


1,206 


2,498 


857 


17 


3,333 


1 












1 




3,332 




6 


48 


285 


928 


2,C65 


18 


1,000 


















1,000 




1 


8 


32 


213 


746 


19 


170 


i 












"i 




169 








4 


30 


135 


Over 19 


22 


















22 






2 


1 


5 


14 


Total number . . . 


105,793 


66,683 


12,118 


11 ,705 


12.095 


11,175 


9,878 


9,357 


355 


39,110 


8,644 


8,578 


7,458 


5,957 


4,641 


3,832 


Number over-age 


4,467 


1,616 


45 


116 


216 


262 


384 


550 


43 


2,851 


791 


801 


540 


322 


248 


149 


Percent over-age. 


4.2 


2.4 


0.4 


1.0 


1.8 


2.3 


3.9 


5.9 


12.1 


7.3 


9.1 


9.3 


7.2 


5.4 


5.3 


3.9 



COLORED BOYS 



5 and under .... 


453 


453! 453 




























6 


1,741 


1,741 


1,371 


369 


1 


























1,783 


1,783 


250 


1,145 


385 


3 






















8 


1,867 


1,867 


45 


371 


1,162 


288 


1 




















9 


1,738 


1,738 


4 


94 


391 


991 


256 


'2 


















10 


1,683 


1,676 


3 


17 


116 


433 


899 


208 




7 


7 












11 


1,647 


1,457 


2 


5 


39 


175 


429 


786 


21 


190 


184 


6 










12 


1,551 


842 




14 


58 


238 


449 


82 


709 


533 


172 


4 








13 


1,413 


369 


1 


1 


7 


15 


74 


233 


38, 1,044 


366 


553 


118 


7 






14. 


1,268 


158 






2 


2 


42 


86 


26 


1,110 


220 


325 


442 


119 


4 




15 


1,169 


43 


:: 




1 


4 


18 


17 


3 


1,126 


95 


185 


349 


387 


107 




16 


781 


8 












6 


2 


773 


14 


49 


107 


230 


296 




17 


480 


1 












1 




479 


2 


3 


35 


72 


152 


215 


18 


164 


















164 






1 


16 


47 


100 


19 


45 


















45 






2 


2 


11 


30 


Over 19 


2 


















2 








1 




1 


Total number . . . 


17,785 


12,136 


2,129 


2,003 


2,118 


1,969 


1,957 


1,788 


172 


5,649 


1,421 


1,293 


1,058 


834 


617 


426 


Number over-age 


2,245 


1,352 


55 


118 


179 


254 


372 


343 


31 


893 


331 


237 


145 


91 


58 


31 


Percent over-age. 


12.6 


11.1 


2,6 


5.9 


8.5 


12.9 


19.0 


19.2 


18.0 


15.8 


23.3 


18.3 


13.7 


10.9 


9.4 


7 3 



* Excludes pupils in kindergarten, special classes, and elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes postgraduates. 
X Age September 1, 1951. 



72 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 25 



Age — Grade Distribution of Maryland County Girls Enrolled — November 1951 



AgeJ 


Total 

All 
Grades 


Grade in Elementary School* 


Grade in High ScHooLf 


Total 
Ele- 
men- 
tary 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Total 
High 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 



WHITE GIRLS 



5 and under .... 


3,346 


3,346 


3,341 


5I .. 




.. 






















10,354 


10,354 


7,160i 3,189 


5 
























7 


10,654 


10,654 


404 


7,114 


3,122 


14 






















8 


11 ,343 


11,343 


26 


697 


7,257 


3,354 


'9 




•• 
















9 


9,794 


9,794 


6 


63 


749 


6,291 


2,663 


22 


















10 


8,817 


8,791 




8 


97 


793 


5,632 


2,260 


1 


26 


26 












11 


8,282 


6,387 






16 


115 


951 


5,214 


90 


1,895 


1,869 


26 










12 


7,982 


1,363 






3 


26 


152 


962 


220 


6,619 


4,623 


1,971 


25 








13 


7,707 


282 








2 


36 


191 


52 


7,425 


1,069 


4,598 


1,736 


22 






14 


7,312 


72 










8 


40 


24 


7.240 


259 


1,187 


4,292 


1,479 


23 




15 


6,631 


16 








i 


1 


9 




6,615 


54 


327 


1,111 


3,723 


1,374 


26 


16 


5,367 


















5,367 


4 


25 


211 


794 


3,091 


1,242 


17 


3,289 


















3,289 




4 


18 


147 


601 


2,519 


18 


582 


















582 






4 


4 


86 


488 


19 


96 


















96 






3 


2 


8 


83 


Over 19 


11 


















11 






1 




1 


9 


Total number . . . 


101,567 


62 ,402 


10,938 


11,077 


11,249 


10,596 


9,452 


8,698 


392 


39 ,165 


7,904 


8,138 


7,401 


6,171 


5,184 


4,387 


Number over-age 


2,081 


831 


33 


72 


116 


144 


197 


240 


29 


1,250 


317 


356 


237 


153 


95 


92 


Percent over-age . 


2.0 


1.3 


0.3 


0.6 


1.0 


1.3 


2.1 


2.7 


7.4 


3.2 


4.0 


4.4 


3.2 


2.5 


1.8 


21 



COLORED GIRLS 



5 and under 


451 




451 


451 




























6 


1,684 


1 


,684 


1,290 


394 




























1,695 


1 


,695 


159 


1,142 


392 


2 






















8 


1,697 


1 


,697 


29 


189 


1,090 


376 


13 




















9 


1,727 


1 


,727 


5 


47 


257 


1,095 


322 


■1 


















10 


1,662 


1 


,656 


1 


7 


73 


320 


948 


307 




6 


6 












11 


1,639 


1 


,359 




3 


9 


93 


324 


881 


49 


280 


266 


14 










12 


1,553 




542 




2 


2 


23 


128 


298 


89 


1,011 


700 


300 


10 


1 






13 


1,480 




221 






3 


8 


41 


128 


41 


1,259 


312 


711 


231 


5 






14 


1,286 




50 








1 


13 


30 


6 


1,236 


104 


353 


583 


186 


10 




16 


1,083 




24 








3 


4 


15 


2 


1,059 


40 


103 


246 


474 


193 


3 


16 


813 




2 












2 




811 


6 


22 


73 


178 


393 


139 


17 


444 




















444 


2 


2 


18 


42 


134 


246 


18 


148 




















148 






1 




21 


121 


19 


31 




















31 






1 




8 


20 


Over 19 


6 




















6 










•• 


6 


Total number . . . 


17,399 


11 


,108 


1,935 


1,784 


1,826 


1,921 


1,793 


1,662 


187 


6,291 


1,436 


1,505 


1,163 


893 


759 


535 


Number over-age 


1,154 




678 


35 


59 


87 


128 


186 


175 


8 


476 


152 


127 


93 


49 


1 29 


26 


Percent over-age . 


6.6 




6.1 


1.8 


3.3 


4.8 


6.7 


10.4 


10.5 


4.3 


7.6 


10.6 


8.4 


8.0 


5 5 


3.8 


4.9 



* Excludes pupils in kindergarten, special clasBes, and elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes postgraduates. 
X Age September 1, 1951. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



TABLE 26— Graduates of Maryland County High Schools by Color-Sex- Year, 
1943-1952; by Color- Sex-County and Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1952 







White 






Colored 




Year 














County 
















Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


BY YEAR 


1943 


6,741 


2,887 


3,854 


689 


271 


418 


1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


718 


271 


447 


1945 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1946 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1947 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1949 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


1950 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


415 


187 


228 


1951 


7,382 


3,391 


3,991 


906 


400 


506 


1952 


7,968 


3,725 


4,243 


910 


409 


501 



BY COUNTY and BALTIMORE CITY, 1951-52 



Total State 


10.678 


5,059 


5,619 


1,674 


682 


992 


Baltimore City .... 


2,710 


1,334 


1,376 


764 


273 


491 


Total Counties .... 


7.968 


3,725 


4,243 


910 


409 


501 


Allegany 


754 


354 


400 


12 


6 


6 


Anne Arundel . 


525 


250 


275 


102 


48 


54 


Baltimore 


1.293 


607 


686 


78 


38 


40 


Calvert 


71 


36 


35 


3 




3 


Caroline 


111 


50 


61 


36 


17 


19 


Carroll 


318 


141 


177 


18 


7 


11 


Cecil 


210 


100 


110 


17 


7 


10 


Charles 


120 


55 


65 


42 


19 


23 


Dorchester .... 


165 


92 


73 


55 


23 


32 


Frederick 


398 


186 


212 


31 


18 


13 


Garrett 


177 


78 


99 








Harford 


332 


148 


184 


36 


11 


25 


Howard 


120 


47 


73 


23 


10 


13 


Kent 


87 


40 


47 


22 


9 


13 


Montgomery* 


953 


451 


502 


76 


34 


42 


Pr. George'sf. . 


1.060 


522 


538 


115 


49 


66 


Queen Anne's . 


75 


33 


42 


20 


9 


11 


St. Mary's. . . . 


79 


31 


48 


29 


12 


17 


Somerset 


95 


43 


52 


60 


32 


28 


Talbot 


112 


55 


57 


24 


13 


11 


Washington . . . 


586 


263 


323 


9 


3 


6 


Wicomico 


207 


86 


121 


68 


29 


39 


Worcester .... 


120 


57 


63 


34 


15 


19 



* Includes 13 boys, 29 girls, graduates of 1952 summer school, 
t Includes 8 boys, 1 girl, graduates of 1952 summer school. 



74 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



Art or 
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Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

(-arroU 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 
Frederick 

(Jarrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

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Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

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Worcester 



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82 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 36— Enrollment* in Each Year of Maryland County High Schools: 

1943-1952 



Year 

Entoino 
June 30 


Total 


Grade 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Post- 
graduate 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1943 


38,394 






12,543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


1944 .... 


36,797 






12,124 


9,764 


8,065 


6,833 


11 


1945 ... 


37,154 






12,314 


9,842 


8,201 


6,783 


14 


1946 .... 


51,922 


10,745 


6,397 


9,305 


10,090 


8,393 


6,967 


25 


1947 


54,886 


12,025 


11,667 


6,613 


8,043 


8,846 


7,629 


63 


1948 


66,524 


12,445 


12,448 


10,960 


5,571 


7,166 


7,897 


37 


1949 


59,500 


13,576 


12,950 


11,863 


9,718 


5,045 


6,314 


34 


1950 .... 


65,312 


14,624 


14,010 


12,677 


10,866 


8,582 


4,505 


48 


1951 .... 


74,321 


16,138 


15,428 


13,947 


11,603 


9,461 


7,728 


16 


1952 


79,199 


16,600 


16,728 


15,037 


12,463 


10,053 


8,307 


11 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1943 .... 


5,159 






1,865 


1,422 


1,088 


784 




1944 .... 


5,083 






1,957 


1,333 


1,004 


789 




1945 .... 


5,138 






1,804 


1,518 


1.016 


799 


1 


1946 


6,899 


1,015 


818 


1,590 


1,475 


1,198 


803 




1947 


7,624 


1,238 


1,823 


1,186 


1,178 


1,178 


1,021 




1948 .... 


8,173 


1,608 


2,128 


1,829 


639 


999 


969 


1 


1949 


8,853 


1,821 


2,340 


1,857 


1,481 


521 


833 




1950 


9,766 


1,993 


2,448 


2,124 


1,551 


1,214 


435 




1951 .... 


11,264 


2,519 


2,548 


2,227 


1,774 


1,212 


984 




1952 


12,090 


2,875 


2,828 


2,235 


1,771 


1,403 


977 


1 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment of individual high schools see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



TABLE 37 — Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses: Maryland County 
High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



English 



County 


7t 


8t 


9t 


10 


11 


12 


Othert 


Grand Total 


19,412 


19,517 


17,327 


14,372 


11,636 


9,272 


3,322 


WHITE 


Total Counties 


16,573 


16,669 


15,086 


12,588 


10,221 


8,293 


3,036 


Allegany 


1,303 


1,257 


1,336 


1,179 


998 


759 


197 


Anne Arundel .... 


1,357 


1,279 


1,030 


869 


652 


544 


92 


Baltimore 


3,324 


3,271 


2,844 


2,209 


1,695 


1,349 


1,041 


Calvert 


126 


115 


102 


91 


66 


76 






216 


229 


237 


191 


162 


122 




Carroll 


673 


636 


558 


460 


367 


324 


143 


Cecil 


484 


452 


396 


355 


285 


224 




Charles 


239 


244 


217 


171 


141 


131 


12 


Dorchester 


275 


284 


255 


224 


193 


162 


18 


Frederick 


677 


848 


837 


607 


527 


422 


8 


Garrett 


275 


400 


341 


272 


234 


181 


82 


Harford 


676 


609 


550 


458 


406 


341 


53 




305 


289 


232 


224 


155 


125 




Kent 


142 


172 


126 


99 


85 


93 




Montgomery 


1,982 


1,912 


1,604 


1,404 


1,222 


978 


46i 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


2,345 


2,200 


2,004 


1,797 


1,480 


1,128 


506 


202 


176 


176 


136 


111 


79 




St. Mary's 


148 


130 


173 


150 


104 


83 






190 


164 


176 


139 


92 


106 


40 


Talbot 


161 


191 


186 


169 


127 


113 






1,243 


1,212 


1,178 


943 


754 


620 


23 i 






361 


327 


274 


236 


211 


152 


Worcester 


230 


238 


201 


167 


129 


122 




COLORED 




2,839 


2,848 


2,241 


1,784 


1,415 


979 


286 


Allegany 


22 


17 


19 


20 


14 


13 




Anne Arundel .... 


412 


346 


286 


227 


145 


118 


12 


Baltimore 


388 


335 


190 


165 


139 


84 


62 


Calvert 


135 


108 


79 


56 


38 






Caroline 


77 


70 


71 


57 


45 


si 




Carroll 


35 


45 


27 


23 


14 


18 




Cecil 


43 


51 


32 


23 


29 


17 






187 


153 


117 


111 


60 


43 








116 


103 


85 


54 


57 






50 


78 


44 


68 


38 


31 




Garrett 
















Harford 


95 


93 


85 


79 


58 


43 




Howard 


83 


79 


70 


49 


41 


27 




Kent 


56 


70 


61 


46 


44 


23 






190 


172 


130 


120 


99 


82 




Prince George's. . . 


536 


460 


355 


263 


212 


124 






82 


70 


53 


41 


40 


21 




St. Mary's 


83 


75 


57 


42 


43 


30 






129 


129 


112 


87 


78 


61 




Talbot 


63 


90 


77 


51 


49 


27 




Washington 


20 


28 


23 


18 


23 


11 




Wicomico 




135 


126 


81 


88 


74 




Worcester 


153 


128 


124 


72 


64 


38 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

X Includes 1,092 taking Journalism; 1,118 taking Public Speaking; 977 taking Dramatics; 103 taking 
Radio Workshop; 19 taking English V; and 13 taking Business English. 



84 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 







\ 

PQ 


1 

I 




II 


wmmm 


Jil 


1,732 
1,661 
1,614 
1,587 
1,547 
1,691 
646 
674 
921 
823 


i 




Ji 








3,757 
3,605 
3,616 
4,401 
4,505 
4,692 
3,391 
2,773 
4,949 
6,390 


ill 


illillll 


Far 
Eastern 
and 
Latin 
Amorican 
Relations 






1 




ti 


« 
'A 




World 
History 


illlilil 


Civics 

and 
Social 
Studies 


lllllilll 


1| 


4 


^ ^ iiiil 


7th 
Gradet 


10,716 
12,953 
12,840 
13,205 
14,597 
15,769 
16,414 








li 


1942-43 
1943 44 

1945-46 

1946 47 

1947 48 

1948 49 

1949 50 

1950 51 

1951 52 



:5 :S 



Ji 



id 



Jil 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



TABLE 39 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies; Maryland 
County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Year 

AND 

County 



Social Studies 



Is 
a! 

G 











o 




tory 


Hist 


S 


m 


c 


^ >> 


s 


s? 


St 


JotXA 


urope 






W 





>> 

O efl 
to u 

s % 



1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949- 50 

1950- 51 

1951- 52 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1,638 
1.827 
1,995 
2,452 
2,882 



2,044 
2,312 
2,446 
2,461 
2,818 



1,384 
1,606 
1,704 
1,765 
1,944 



645 
1,092 
1,191 
1,406 
1,205 



928 
858 
1,072 
1,156 
1,407 



678 
383 
499 
729 
831 



o o 
c ? 
CO 



252 
186 
294 
320 
170 



356 
214 
128 
123 
189 



129 
139 



o 



180 



34 



03 Oh 



79 
141 

87 
112 

70 



25 
45 
130 
379 
361 



. . \ 
11 1 
104 
59 
36] 



BY COUNTY, 1951-52 



22 




19 




20 


17 


26 














412 


346 


286 






145 


118 












163 


388 


335 


180 


164 




139 


84 














135 


108 


69 


52 




38 
















77 


70 


67 


49 




40 


35 














48 


32 


27 


23 




38 
















43 


51 


32 


23 




29 


a 














187 


153 


117 


111 




60 


43 






19 










116 




19 




55 






104 


120 








50 


78 




68 




38 


3i 














95 


93 


85 


53 




51 


43 




58 










83 


79 


70 


49 




42 


24 














56 


70 


61 


46 




44 


23 














190 


172 


130 


23 




99 


13 














536 


460 


355 


184 




213 


125 














82 


70 


53 


41 




40 


21 














83 


75 


57 


32 




62 


21 














129 


129 


112 


87 




78 


61 




21 










93 


90 


77 


27 




49 














21 


20 


28 


23 


18 






34 
















135 




64 




60 


74 


126 










21 


153 


128 


124 


72 




64 


38 












56 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

t Includes classes taught by teachers certified in social studies; the remaining classes in this subject ap- 
pear in TABLE 43. 



86 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



03 
^3 



00 



O(M(M<M05«5 
■<* 0> X li^ CO 
10 CO i-l (M C<1 



asMeoTftoN • • -co 
T-i 00 oc CO • • -i-i 

•^ICW • • • 



a50i-ia5(M-*irt(M'*eo 
>05£>t>c»i-ieoTj<ioooc» 



loajeoooot-HixiinTj^eo 

(N W C^" (M* y-^ T-T rH Cvf 



mo50t-eOT-ieoc-oeo 
cou^(MTHa5C^cooooooo 

ai_ t> a5_ rH 00 OS 

cococo'^'^cococococo 



■^fooioutincocDco-^t- 
Or-imooeocx;a>i>o 

kO-^lMrH-^tCgrHCvIlOlC 



«DO(M0COrH^'*(N(M 
OOOtOeOO>C~OMOO<N 
rHeO(N(MCD(N rH 



Ot-<X>00(Ma5rHlOIX!O 

t>ooooco«oco-^05rHa> 
inrHOt>-^40oooo(Na5 



eoiM-^ococooocooco 

(NOrJ<iftcO«£l05(MOCO 

00 00 00 oT c-"" M 00' oT o r-T 



coicot-eoeorHcor-im 

OOt~-0000t~OiXi|>;D 
i/^ C^^ (>5 C0_ t> t> O t> t> CO 

oToT oTt-'"'* oc^o o'rH CO* 



• CO O CO rH 00 10 Tj< 

• rH (M rH Oi (M O 

• CO co__o -^t^o t> 

■ ?D 0"rH rH 



• in T}< <D CO «o eo a> 

• rH (N CO O 00 

• l> -"a^^^OO Oi_-^ 

■ ©"rH rH rH Cvj 10 



CjeO-^lC«Dt-OC050rH 



•OOrHeOeO-^rH«DrH05rHOt~eOa>-^(NOi«> 
•Ot>00e005O0>Cgin-<#(M(Nrl<CsIrJ<«>Tl<o;D 
■rH rH CO rH 



^t-rHCOmt-rHOiOOOl'-IOlOt-liOlC^DtOeOrHOOOOOO 

io;D«DooCT>iou3t>oorHt>rHcooeoooo^u5c^t>t~mTi< 

O<^0C rH CO rH rH <Xi (M 0^ rH CO IC rH rH rH 00 (N rH 



rH^rHT}<Ti<T}<oot-inioeot-rHt>>AeOCTi«ooT)<05eooo 
0(N'^ooeoojcarH;0'*iOTi<eorHoco«D-^w^rH(M«o 

rHOiOO (MlOeONC<I«ON»0(NrHrHXrHrHrHrHOCO'-l 



iooi(NmoimrHTj<in;Doa500rHoo«D«Dr-ioo(Nt-ot- 
ast-?OrH(Ncooo-^oo-*ooooooo«oc-eomai<M?Dco 

(NC^<NrH(M(XITj<(M(Nt-'^«OC^»Hair)<rHrHrHrHOeOlM 



Ot-t~«D<OCO«£>rHkn«>m;CiO(N-*00(MOCCOrHeO --^ 
rH lO (N (M rH t> 00 10 t- m t- t> O t- rH O Tjl 00 O CO -OS 
eO rH CO rH «5 Tl< (M CI 10 M ;D CO rH 0> QO (M rH rH 1-1 O • rH 



01 03 



5 a 



aj4= o 2 03 es o 0) O'C ©^►^■•^>£ 



5« 8 

«-Ph S 
o " o 

^- O 0) 

^ " o. 

» O I 

g cs 

O 0) 

oO g 

■is': 

to » 
^ S ^ 



is £ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



TABLE 41 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science: Maryland 
County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Year and 
County 


Scie 

•)— 

-§ 
a 
t-, 

O 
c- 


8th Gradet 


General Science 


Biology 


Related Science 


Applied Science 


Chemistry | 


Physics 1 


Senior Science | 


S" 

la 


1947-48 


1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 




639 


298 


241 


181 


1948-49 


1,543 


1,911 


1,544 


1,265 


78 


89 




549 


156 


279 


33 


1949-50 


1,741 


2,167 


1,528 


1,190 


57 


157 




581 


307 


92 


61 


1950-51 


1,557 


1,733 


1,919 


1,673 


130 


201 




771 


403 


172 


92 


1951-52 


2,241 


2,230 


2,128 


1.553 


225 


250 




697 


356 


123 


19 



BY COUNTY 1951-52 



Allegany 


21 


17 


19 


20 














Anne Arundel . . . 






284 


227 






70 


28 






Baltimore 


388 


335 


190 


155 


20 


lii 


60 








Calvert 


135 


108 


57 


44 






14 








Caroline 


77 


70 


33 


49 






41 


io 


26 




Carroll 


48 


32 


27 


23 






19 




13 




Cecil 


43 


51 


32 


23 






29 








Charles 


187 


153 


117 


111 






17 




46 




Dorchester 




116 


103 


86 


103 




49 




20 




Frederick 


50 


78 


44 


34 






16 








Garrett 






















Harford 


35 


30 


85 


79 




26 


54 








Howard 


83 


79 


29 


34 








23 






Kent 


56 


70 


63 


46 




39 




27 






Montgomery .... 


190 


173 


129 


68 


65 






30 






Prince George's . 


368 


291 


355 


253 




2i 


58 


37 


is 




Queen Anne's . . . 


82 


70 


53 


28 






40 


21 






St. Mary's 


83 


49 


46 




37 


2i 


12 








Somerset 


129 


129 


112 


87 






51 


6i 






Talbot 


93 


90 


77 


16 






49 


27 






Washington 


20 


28 


23 


18 








34 






Wicomico 




133 


126 


80 






9i 


58 








153 


128 


124 


72 




26 


27 









* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 
J If given in other than 7th and /or 8th grades. 



88 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



Commer- 
cial and 
Business 
Arith- 
metict 


03 00 O C^OO 05 rH «>_C<J_X^ 


Vocational 


Applied 
Mathe- 
matics 


OlOOOOOi-iTf«OOCCi-l 

a50r}«coinooeoo««o 


Mathe- 
matics 
Review 


r-(a5t-tCi-"«o«oooN05 

a>t>-*00-^«5<MO(M00 


Solid 
Geometry 


OTft~co«Dt-Oi-(f-ie<3 

(N«lTl<00rHa5t-Ot>« 


Trigono- 
metry 


■<i'eoeoi>P3oooot--^t- 

C-t>t>t>O5O5i«U5O500 


Plane 
Geometry 


cowt-OTjiTuccTtooai 
O50ot-05e>3>-toom^t> 

cocccococccoc^cococo 


Algebra II 

1 


t>ow<*i>oot^t-eo-«J< 
iOOt~eo-!i<oooe<3(NUj 
'"1. °^ t-;. 


1 

Algebra I 


t-;^ eC IN C-^ N 00 00 N t-;^ t-^_ 
lO «0 CO Tf CO U5 ic «o 


General 
Mathe- 
matics II 


osoicoorfeceoooNoi 

«0 «>_TJ<^IM 00 t> ?D 


General 
Mathe- 
matics I 


OOOeOiOy^TtiMiOlM-* 

t> ai_ M 00 «D eo t> 

t> <o i> lo eo"" t> 00 00 o oT 


w 

e 


8th Gradet 


• • • IN oirH eo C7> in t> 

• • • (N 00 05 CO eo to 

• • t> 00 o_co^t> 


Mathei 


7th Gradet 


• • iNt-eooiocoo 
. . . Tjt o «5 in o; CO t> 

• • •!> rH (Nco -^^^eo o 
■ 'o'lNiN eo t> 


Year 
AND County 


eoT}<in?ot-ooo50iH(N 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

(NCO-*in«Dt>00050i-( 

T}4^Ti<TfTfTfrj**^inin 



ineoio • -w^ecoooint-t- 
«£>oo-* • -iNcoiNeooosrHec 

i-H (N • • 



•ooo«oinioint>»Hri< 



u50J'^oo(NC^iNeoeot-ooT}ieO'H«DrH05'H'<i'mino5oo 
Neo<e'-i(NO«(N;DTi<ino?OT-ico'*ineoeo«iN«oeo 
eoNm »H r-t i-{ in«o m 



•<j<in»Heo<Nt-ooeo«oojt>w<f-<to«ox<-i,-imt>©o 
oiNOiNmt>-<i<coinTi<eoeoeoeo^t>«eoeO'^o«iN 



o<N05'-ioot-c^oo50oeoo5ineo«DOincoiNX'<i'eo«D 
t>rH(McocoosmOrHccoT}<inincoin;D<Din«D«D.H(N 

CO-^t> .-( rH r-l i-H ^ N ,H tH OO t}< 



mt-t~oo-«i<inin-*Tj»(NiNt'-*050oo-^o>oot-t-mr-i 
eo«DOt>c-05inTj<T)<oot>ooot-eooo;D(NC<iiNO 
c-toeo i-H CO IN t-H o eo '1' IN m O ri i-h ,-i th os i-i 



(N05r-(in05inrl<OS-*oOOOS05(N050«OiHlN»-(ININOO 

05t-t-»HiNeot--*oo-«foooot-oot>eot-05i-i«3eo 

ININlN'-'IN^TjtNC<100'*'<OlNrHO5(Nr-lr-li-(i-H(NeOIN 



i-it-c<i500co«o«oint-'<*;Dinc<it-'^iNoo!Oi-Heo 
,-(ininc^iNt-oo-^c-t-t>t>o-^oooooTj<o5?DTi< 

e0^eO__ 00^1-1 INtD-<fC<llN«5C<l«5cO'H OS^CJ (N rH rH (N 
T-riHeo* t-Tm" r-T 




C 

o • ^; 

S£ 2 § b 



Maryland State Department of Education 89 



TABLE 43 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and 
Business Education: Maryland County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 

I 



Year and 
County 


Mathe 

9) 

2 
o 

t- 


8th Grade |- 


General 
Mathematica I 


General 
Mathematics II 


Algebra 


Plane Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Mathematics Review 


Vocational and 
Applied Mathematics 


Commercial and 
Business 
Arithmetic 


Business 
Kducationt 


1947-48 


1,612 


1,962 


1,222 


195 


921 


319 


58 


344 


356 


422 


229 


1948-49 


1,819 


2,229 


1,396 


123 


1,001 


311 


35 


329 


176 


380 


386 


1949-50 


1,995 


2,331 


1,467 


187 


1,028 


330 


14 


394 


145 


556 


474 


1950-51 


2,471 


2,500 


1,459 


382 


1,153 


449 


19 


325 


513 


584 


656 


1951-52 


2,877 


2,823 


1,742 


116 


959 


287 


79 


353 


551 


632 


1,017 



I 



BY COUNTY, 1951-52 



Allegany 


22 


17 






19 


12 






9 






Anne Arundel . . . 


408 


336 


108 




74 


21 


26 




247 


35 


100 


Baltimore 


388 


335 


189 




124 


35 




53 


48 


30 


110 


Calvert 


135 


108 


64 


32 


32 


5 












Caroline 


76 


70 


63 




16 


19 




6 




24 




Carroll 


48 


32 


27 


i3 


19 










23 






43 


51 


32 












ii 


52 




Charles 


187 


153 


117 


33 


39 






35 




78 


67 






116 


105 


13 


23 


8 




56 






43 




50 


78 


44 




16 


8 




23 






68 


Garrett 
























Harford 


95 


93 


85 


25 


22 






43 


30 




25 


Howard 


83 


79 


69 




22 


22 










94 


Kent 


56 


70 


61 




46 










2i 




Montgomery .... 


190 


171 


24 




41 






22 


lii 


55 


93 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


536 


460 


355 




49 


ie 




23 


44 


12 


280 


82 


70 


53 




61 










41 






83 


75 


47 




33 






27 




56 


12 


Somerset 


129 


129 


112 




121 






21 


27 


57 




Talbot 


93 


90 


.. 




12 


49 








77 




Washington 


20 


28 






23 


34 






is 






Wicomico 




134 


63 




116 


32 


29 


44 




53 


26 


Worcester 


153 


128 


124 




51 


26 








18 


99 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. Also see TABLE 39 



90 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 44 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1943 to 1952 



Year Ending 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 


1944 


1,767 


2,927 


719 


1,652 


384 


736 


1945 


1,825 


2,986 


877 


1,645 


452 


762 


1946t 


1,721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947t 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948t 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 


1949t . 


1,364 


2,086 


786 


1,295 


559 


745 


1950t 


1,684 


2,436 


937 


1,356 


720 


854 


1951t 


1,575 


2,369 


968 


1,492 


792 


949 


1952t 


1,563 


2,437 


1,008 


1,468 


927 


1,001 



TABLE 45 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Year and 
County 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Boys 


Girls 


Boya 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1947-48t 


23 


29 


22 




59 


1 


20 


1948-49t 


16 


18 


45 




103 


4 


36 


1949-50t 


22 


28 


90 




106 


13 


32 


1950-51t 


28 


49 


63 




136 


25 


68 


1951-52t 


30 


43 


78 




137 


31 


90 



















BY COUNTY, 1951-52 



Allegany 








29 


i2 


62 


Anne Arundel. . . 


9 


6 


17 


Baltimore 






24 


24 






Calvert 






5 


6 

23 






Dorchester 






7 






Montgomery .... 






6 


26 


i9 


28 


Prince George's . 






8 
10 


14 


Talbot 






10 






Washington 






1 


5 






Wicomico 


21 


37 











♦ Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 

t Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1952 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 46 — White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1943 to 1952 



Year Ending 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


June 30 














Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1943 


10,731 


1,244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 


1944 


8,904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946t 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947t 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948t 


15,414 


1,119 


2,629 


16,165 


1,596 


1949t 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 


1950t 


21,619 


1,488 


3,199 


18,989 


2,532 


1951t 


24,739 


1,538 


4,174 


20,667 


2,566 


1952t 


25,988 


1,499 


3,480 


23,399 


2,032 



fl 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Year and 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


County 














Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1948t 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


1949t 


1,599 


282 


1,247 


2,533 


1,275 


1950t 


2,099 


204 


1,083 


2,929 


1,023 


1951t 


2,815 


341 


1,265 


3,333 


1,168 


1952t 


3,567 


269 


1,023 


3,538 


1,130 



BY COUNTY, 1951-52 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's . . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



55 
488 
386 
92 
65 
74 
92 
99 
107 
133 

192 
167 

75 
242 
412 
143 

29 
307 
126 

57 
226 



141 
21 



107 



48 



85 
36 
61 
197 
126 
73 

6i 

49 

82 



16 
411 
444 
112 
118 

66 

67 
105 
189 

82 

147 
36 
58 
250 
620 
74 
68 
253 
129 
67 
196 
30 



24 
209 
24 
64 

30 

36 

75 



53 
57 
64 
50 
149 
90 
62 
39 
56 



48 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any. 

For 1962 enrollment in individual schools see TABLE XXIII. 



92 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 48— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1943 to 1952 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13,277 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 


1945 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2,199 


12,507 


14,457 


1946t 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947t 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948t 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949t 


21,929 


24,141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 


1950t 


23,800 


26,374 


11,940 


11,513 


30,049 


29,236 


1951t 


26,806 


29,276 


12,889 


12,853 


34,094 


32,955 


1952t 


28,275 


30,650 


15,339 


15,253 


35,768 


34,101 



TABLE 49 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical 


Education 














June 30 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948t 


3,017 


3,584 


823 


777 


3,154 


3,503 


1949t 


3,322 


3,844 


1,217 


1,054 


3,717 


4,354 


1950t 


3,552 


4,051 


1,301 


1,166 


4,147 


4,504 


1951t 


4,624 


5,133 


1,601 


1,712 


5,046 


5,656 


1952t 


4,951 


5,421 


1,656 


1,732 


5,409 


6,004 



BY COUNTY, 1951-52 



Allegany 


45 


39 






12 


10 


Anne Arundel . . . 


713 


821 


293 


142 


698 


762 


Baltimore 


631 


672 


483 


509 


623 


667 


Calvert 


142 


199 


14 


20 


180 


220 


Caroline 


165 


176 


46 


31 


162 


166 


Carroll 


83 


79 


9 


13 


83 


79 


Cecil 


85 


93 






92 


103 


Charles 


273 


368 


33 


47 


273 


368 


Dorchester 


145 


133 






211 


204 


Frederick 


159 


150 


26 


24 


159 


150 


Garrett 
















2ii 


222 


3i 


29 


224 


227 


Howard 


173 


166 






178 


168 


Kent 


148 


153 


29 


27 


148 


153 


Montgomery .... 


178 


167 


47 


71 


255 


308 


Prince George's . 


646 


765 


467 


632 


861 


1,069 


Queen Anne's . . . 


143 


162 






143 


164 


St. Mary's 


104 


138 


i3 


17 


104 


138 


Somerset 


249 


248 






304 


292 


Talbot 


190 


175 






202 


185 


Washington 


57 


66 


34 


37 


57 


66 


Wicomico 


128 


133 






157 


209 


Worcester 


283 


296 


131 


133 


283 


296 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1952 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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95 



TABLE 52 — Enrollment in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 




Total 


Boys 


GirU 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



Total 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester . . . 
Garrett 



3,543 


1,328 


2,215 


Harford 


286 


131 


155 




156 


75 


81 


259 


101 


158 


Montgomery 


325 


107 


218 


277 


91 


186 


Prince George's 


439 


156 


283 


546 


204 


342 


Somerset 


28 


15 


13 


52 


24 


28 


Talbot 


120 


49 


71 


107 


16 


91 


Washington 


275 


79 


196 


76 


26 


50 


Wicomico 


246 


114 


132 


95 


46 


49 




124 


47 


77 


132 


47 


85 











COLORED ENROLLMENT 



Total 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Howard 



421 


229 


192 




34 


24 


10 








Prince George's 


105 


55 


50 


27 


13 


14 


Talbot 


54 


30 


24 


60 


45 


15 




83 


37 


46 


58 


25 


33 











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Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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171 
233 
211 


County 


Per Cent in Total 
Counties: 1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 

Total Number: 1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 



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Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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102 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland Statk Okpartmknt ok F^ducation 



103 



TABLE 60 

Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools; Number of Principals and Teachers; 
Year Ending June 30, 1952 









General Supervisors by Type of 














School 










Principals 


Total 








Other 


Pupil 


County 






Elementary 






Personnel 




Teachers 


visors 






nign 


visorst 










White 


Colored 








Total State 


13.333 .2 


220 .7 


59.6 


17.9 


54.2 


89.0 


93.7 


Baltimore City 


4,316.2 


75 . 5 


9.0 


5.0 


13.0 


48.5 


43.0 


Total Counties 


9,017.0 


145.2 


50.6 


12.9 


41.2 


40.5 


50.7 


Allegany 


563.3 


9.0 


3.0 




2.0 


4.0 


3.0 


Anne Arundel 


706.2 


' 8.0 


3.0 


So 


2.0 


2.0 


4.0 


Baltimore 


1,481 .9 


24.3 


6.5 


1.0 


8.1 


8.7 


\ 8.0 


Calvert 


102.5 


2.0 


1.0 


l.O 




••• 


1.0 




144.0 


2.4 


1.0 


0.4 


i.6 




i 1.0 


Carroll 


310.6 


4.5 


2.0 


0.2 


1.0 


1.3 


2.0 


Cecil 


233.1 


3.5 


2.0 


t 


1.0 


0.5 


1 1.0 


Charles 


206.9 


3.7 


1.0 


1.0 


1.7 




i 1 -7 


Dorchester 


194.0 


3.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 




1 .0 


Frederick 


363.1 


5.0 


1.5 


0.3 


1.7 


1.5 


1 .0 




179.9 


3.9 


2.4 




1.5 




i 1.0 


Harford 


346.9 


4.5 


2.0 


t" 


2.5 




2.0 


Howard 


177.9 


3.7 


1.2 


0.6 


1.4 


„ 


' 1 .0 


Kent 


107.5 


2.5 


1.0 


0.5 


1.0 




1.0 


Montgomery 


1,196.7 


20.0 


8.0 


0.5 


4.0 


7.5 


5.5 


Prince George's . . . 


1,239.9 


18.5 


4.0 


1.0 


3.0 


10.5 


1 7.0 




122.0 


2.5 


1.0 


0.5 


1.0 




0.5 


St. Mary's 


115.9 


2.9 


1.0 


0.8 


0.9 


0.2 


1.0 


Somerset 


146.3 


3.0 


1.0 


0.6 


1.4 




1 .0 


Talbot 


140.5 


2.5 


1.0 


0..T 


1.0 




1.0 


Washington 


547.0 


8.8 


3.0 


t 


2.0 


3.8 


3.0 


Wicomico 


227.4 


4.0 


2.0 


1.0 


1 .0 




2.0 


Worcester 


163.5 


3.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 




1.0 



* E.xcludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio-Visual Education, Commercial, Curriculum, Distributive Edu- 
cation, English, Guidance, Handwriting, Health, History, Home Economics, Industrial Education, In- 
struction, Libraries, Mathematics, Mu.sic, Physical Education, Radio Education, Rf ading. School Lunch, 
.Special Education, Vocational Education. 

X Less than . 1 of supervisor's time. 



104 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 61 — Number of Individuals* Employed as Clerks in Schools and Salaries 
Paid: Maryland County Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 







Number 


Salaries 




Number 


Salaries 




County 


of Clerks 


Paid 


Count y 


of Clerks 


Paid 



Total Counties . 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 
Garrett 



338 


$454,588.39 


Harford 




Howard 


12 


19,687.07 


Kent 


31 


43,897.47 


Montgomery 


68 


106,029.42 


Prince George's 


3 


3,338.75 


Queen Anne's 


6 


2,532.28 


St. Mary's 


9 


8,102.50 


Somerset 


8 


6,156.75 


Talbot 


4 


4,411.75 




2 


480.00 


Wicomico 


12 


14,299.39 


Worcester 


2 


2,964.70 





9 


$10,584.04 


6 


4,150.00 


63 


114,189.93 


67 


66,694.77 


2 


4,719.00 


i 


685.00 


17 


24,845.46 


11 


14,134.22 


5 


2,785.89 



Includes some individuals on part-time basis. 



TABLE 62 — Repair or Utility Men; Janitors, Cleaners, Firemen, etc.: Maryland 
Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 





Repair or Utility Men 




Janitors 


, Cleaners, Firemen, Etc. 


County 


Total 


Full- 


Part- 


White 


Colored 




Time 


Time 


Total 


Full- 

Time 


Part- 
Time 


Totel 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Total State 


613 


437 


176 


1,584 

405 


1,019 


565 


670 


324 


346 


Baltimore City . . 


223 


223 


203 


202 


464 


232 


232 


Total Counties . . 


390 


214 


176 


1,179 


816 


363 


206 


92 


114 


Allegany 


2 


2 




83 


73 


10 


2 


1 




Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore 


16 

8 


15 
7 


i 

1 


79 
246 
8 


71 
119 


8 

127 


33 
28 


13 
11 


20 
17 


Calvert 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 




Caroline 


4 


2 


2 


14 


6 


8 


5 


1 


i 


Carroll 


1 


1 




19 


19 




2 


2 




Cecil 


3 


3 




26 


18 


8 


3 


2 


"i 


Charles 






12 


12 




7 


7 




Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 


i 


3 




22 
51 


18 
31 


4 

20 


4 

8 


4 
1 


'7 


Garrett 


3 


2 




15 


15 










Harford 

Howard 


6 
2 


4 

2 


2 


40 
12 


28 
10 


\2 
2 


8 
9 


3 
2 


'5 
7 


Kent 


2 




i 


11 


6 


5 


7 


2 


5 


Montgomery . . 
Pr. George's. . . 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 


175 
127 
1 


65 
90 
1 


110 
37 


223 
175 

13 
6 

11 


191 
110 

8 
5 
7 


32 
65 
5 
1 
4 


17 
43 
2 
2 
3 


9 
18 
2 
2 
3 


8 
25 


Talbot 


3 




3 


12 


8 


4 


7 


2 


'5 


Washington . . . 
Wicomico 


25 


ii 


14 


69 
19 


38 
13 


31 
6 


2 
2 


2 
1 


i 


Worcester 


2 


2 




13 


6 


7 


9 


1 


8 





















Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 63 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Schools: 
Years Ending June 30, 1951 and 1952 



County 




White 


Schools 




Colored Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1952 


Total Counties 


507 


504 


88.8 


89.4 


212 


188 


93.0 


88.7 


Allegany 


34 


33 


89.5 


86.8 


1 


2 


50.0 


100.0 


Anne Arundel 


37 


37 


100.0 


100.0 


24 


24 


100.0 


100.0 


Baltimore 


51 


51 


94.4 


94.4 


14 


14 


100.0 


100.0 


Calvert 


6 


6 


100.0 


100.0 


14 


13 


100.0 


92.9 


Caroline 


9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 


3 


3 


75.0 


75.0 


Carroll 


17 


18 


89.5 


94.7 


2 


2 


100.0 


100.0 


Cecil 


17 


17 


77.3 


77.3 


3 


3 


100.0 


100.0 


Charles 


8 


8 


100.0 


100.0 


20 


17 


95.2 


94.4 


Dorchester 


14 


6 


51.9 


23.1 


4 




33.3 




Frederick 


24 


22 


80.0 


78.6 


7 


5 


87.5 


62.5 


Garrett 


26 


27 


61.9 


77.1 










Harford 


22 


23 


95.7 


100.0 


3 




100 "6 






9 


9 


90.0 


100.0 


9 


"8 


90.0 


88.9 


Kent 


11 


10 


100.0 


100.0 


6 


6 


100.0 


100.0 


M ontgomery 


53 


58 


100.0 


100.0 


13 


13 


100.0 


100.0 


Prince George's 


56 


58 


96.6 


96.7 


31 


25 


100.0 


100.0 


Queen Anne's 


13 


11 


81.3 


68.8 


12 


9 


92.3 


90.0 


St. Mary's 


11 


11 


68.8 


84.6 


8 


7 


80.0 


100.0 


Somerset 


12 


12 


100.0 


100.0 


10 


9 


100.0 


100.0 


Talbot 


11 


12 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


9 


100.0 


90.0 


Washington 


40 


40 


93.0 


93.0 


1 


1 


100.0 


100.0 


Wicomico 


16 


16 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 


Worcester 


10 


10 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 



106 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 64 

Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties: 1943-1952 



Year 
Kndtng June 80 



White 



Elementary 



Number Per Cent 



High 



Number Per Cent 



Colored 



Elementary 



Number Per Cent 



High 



Number Per Cent 



1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 



139 
108 
104 
107 
125 
161 
175 
243 
295 
380 



5.2 
4.0 
3.7 
3.9 
4.5 
5.4 
5.5 
7.1 
8.0 
9.1 



538 
488 
465 
629 
787 
931 
1,025 
1,203 
1,454 
1,654 



29.7 
27.3 
25.8 
29.4 
33.8 
36.7 
38.3 
41.1 
44.0 
45.9 



58 


9.7 


81 


42.0 


44 


7.5 


72 


34.8 


43 


7.1 


78 


36.8 


45 


7.5 


88 


33.7 


52 


8.6 


103 


34.4 


62 


10.1 


126 


37.2 


68 


10.5 


140 


37.3 


70 


10.6 


154 


36.6 


73 


11.0 


205 


40.0 


77 


11.1 


212 


38.1 



See TABLE X. 



TABLE 65 

Maryland College Graduates of 1951 Who Qualified to Teach in Maryland Public 
Schools: By College and Number Who Taught in Maryland Public 
Schools in 1951-52* 



College or University 



Maryland College Graduates op 1951 Quali- 
fied TO Teach in Maryxand Public Schools 



Taught in Maryland 
Public Schools in 1951-52 




Total 

Goucher College 

Hood College 

I^yola College 

Maryland Institute 

Maryland State Collejje — Princess Annf . . . 
McCoy College — Johns Hopkins University 

Morgan College 

Mount St. Mary's College 

Notre Dame College 

Peabody Conservatory of Music 

Saint Joseph's College 

Washington College 

Western Maryland College 

University of Maryland 

State Teachers Colleges: 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 



557 
2 



1 

5 
8 
46 
3 
9 
8 

7 
31 
139 

36 
49 
50 
41 
119 



♦ Based on reports from colleges. Vocational placement not available for all graduates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



TABLE 66 — Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared to Qualify for Standard 
Teaching Certificates in Maryland: 1949—1952* 



• •'■ ■ 

1 YPE OF L/ERTIFICATE 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


White 


Colored 


1 

White 

1 1 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Grand Total 


485 




737 


208 


lit 




D /y 


III 


Nursery School and 


















Kindergarten 






50 




75 




38 




Elementary 


















120 Semester hours 


94 


45 


126 


62 


156 


109 


224 


73 


Junior High (Core) 


21 




101 




98 




73 




High School 


















Total High School 


370 


114 


460 


146 


448 


102 


344 


98 


Agriculture 


9 


1 


20 


4 


30 


5 


10 


6 


Art 


15 




12 




20 


3 


21 




Commerce 


5 








7 


2 


9 


3 


English 


62 


20 


67 


ii 


51 


18 


57 


15 


Foreign Language (any) . 


33 


8 


13 


3 


16 


7 


16 


2 




9 


10 


24 


15 


33 


7 


19 


9 


Industrial Arts 


16 


13 


28 


6 


32 


3 


27 


2 


Library Science 


1 
















Mathematics 


26 


" 8 


38 


" 7 


23 


' 4 


14 


9 




14 


7 


17 


12 


28 


3 


30 


9 


Physical Education: 


















Men 


39 


13 


79 


27 


66 


11 


40 


13 


"Women 


23 


5 


21 


13 


24 


10 


14 


5 


Science: 


















All Sciences 










15 




21 




General Science 


■ 8 


■ '6 


•27 


6 


5 


7 


2 


i 


Biology 


15 


3 


10 


10 


7 


1 


5 


1 




6 


1 


8 




2 




2 






5 




3 








1 




Social Sciences 


84 


'i9 


83 


26 


85 


21 j 


56 


24 








1 




3 









* Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in his first major). 



108 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 67— County Teachers in Service October, 1951, Who Attended Summer 
Schools and Evening Classes: Spring and Summer 1951 



County 


Teachers in Service Oct. 1951 Who 
Attended School in 1951 


School Attended 


Number of 
Teachers 


Total 
Num- 
ber 


Number 


Per Cent 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White 


1,587 


783 


804 


18 


9 


22 


2 


Allegany 


100 


38 


62 


14 


3 


21 


3 


Anne Arundel . . 


104 


47 


57 


15 


3 


22 


6 


Baltimore 


302 


178 


124 


23 


7 


20 


5 


Calvert 


10 


4 


6 


14 


3 


22 


2 


Caroline 


11 


3 


8 


5 


8 


13 


.3 


Carroll 


35 


12 


23 


8 


6 


15 


.0 


Cecil 


28 


8 


20 


7 


8 


17 


.9 


Charles 


20 


9 


11 


16 




18 


.0 




20 


11 


9 


15 


5 


12 


.9 


Frederick 


52 


15 


37 


9 


6 


20 


.8 


Garrett 


89 


46 


43 


47 


.4 


51 


.2 




47 


21 


26 


12 


3 


21 


.0 




36 


11 


25 


15 


5 


35 


.7 


Kent 


14 


8 


6 


21 


6 


15 


.4 


Montgomery. . . 


359 


214 


145 


32 


6 


32 


.2 


Prince George's . 


157 


60 


97 


10 


7 


20 


.3 


Queen Anne's . . 


12 


4 


8 


9 


3 


17 


.4 


St. Mary's 


8 




8 






23 


.5 


Somerset 


13 


'8 


5 


ie 


3 


10 


.9 


Talbot 


15 


8 


7 


16 


3 


14 


.6 


Washington .... 


115 


54 


61 


19 


9 


23 


.1 




17 


12 


5 


11 


2 


8 


2 


Worcester 


23 


12 


11 


22 


6 


19 






Total 

University of Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 

Towson State Teachers College . . . 

Columbia University 

George Washington University .... 

West Virgmia University 

Western Maryland College 

Pennsylvania State College 

Shepherd State Teachers College . . 

University of Delaware 

Temple University 

Fairmont Teachers College 

New York University 

Catholic University 

University of Pittsburgh 

California, Pa. State Teachers Col. 

University of Pennsylvania 

Radford College 

Duke University 

University of Virginia 

American University 

Bloomsburg State Teachers College 
Shippensburg State Teachers Col. . 

Loyola College 

Maryland College 

Syracuse University 

One Hundred Ten Others 



783 


804 


313 


299 


65 


42 


bU 




40 


55 


45 


54 


12 


44 


17 


33 


5 


39 


24 


rt 


23 


13 


6 


14 


9 


5 


7 


18 


1 


17 


6 


12 


7 


1 




7 


3 


2 


1 


4 


7 


2 


2 


10 


6 


1 


5 


4 


2 


6 


1 


3 


4 


1 


112 


113 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored . . 


347 


179 


168 


25 


8 


29 


6 


Allegany 


2 


1 


1 


2 





16 


7 


Anne Arundel . . 


40 


17 


23 


20 


2 


37 


7 


Baltimore 


43 


24 


19 


33 


8 


32 


2 


Calvert 


7 


3 


4 


10 


3 


20 





Caroline 


8 


3 


5 


18 


7 


31 


3 


Carroll 


4 


3 


1 


33 


3 


12 


.5 


Cecil 


9 


5 


4 


55 


5 


40 





Charles 


20 


16 


4 


32 





11 


.4 


Dorchester 


21 


14 


7 


45 


2 


33 


.3 




9 


3 


6 


17 


6 


42 


9 


Garrett 
















Harford 


ii 


'2 


9 


io 


5 


36 


.6 


Howard 


14 


6 


8 


30 





47 


.1 


Kent 


3 


1 


2 


6 


3 


12 


.5 


Montgomery . . . 


39 


20 


19 


41 


7 


42 


.2 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 


41 


22 


19 


19 


8 


23 


.5 


6 


1 


5 


6 


3 


29 


4 


St. Mary's 


10 


7 


3 


31 


8 


18 


.7 


Somerset 


14 


7 


7 


26 


9 


29 


.2 


Talbot 


17 


10 


7 


40 





36 


.8 


Washington .... 


4 


3 


1 


50 





12 


.5 




8 


2 


6 


5 


4 


26 


1 


Worcester 


17 


9 


8 


34 


6 


30 


8 



Total 

Morgan State College. ... 

New York University 

Temple University 

Columbia University 

Hampton Institute 

Catholic University 

Howard University 

University of Pennsylvania 
Virginia State College. . . . 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Delaware. . . 

Boston University 

University of Maryland*. . 

Storer College 

University of Pittsburgh . . 

Bucknell University 

American University 

Loyola College 

Cornell University 

West Virginia University . . 
University of Michigan . . . 
Johns Hopkins University . 
Twenty-two Others 



* The University of Maryland offered extension courses on the campus of Bowie State Teachers [College 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



TABLE 68 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1949-50, 1950-51, 1951-52 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issxjed 



1949-50 



1950-61 1951-52 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 

Supervision of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 

Visiting Teacher 

County Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Permits — Foreign Exchange Teachers 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

War Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Non-Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Non-Degree 



2.094 



12 



20 
352 
268 
46 
69 
64 



24 

307 

5 

i9 
13 



189 

360 



12 
i93 



39 



2,312 



18 



19 
393 
315 

51 
121 

54 



47 
371 
7 
9 
30 
17 



175 
387 



16 
173 



2,549 

6 
13 
11 

2 

ii 

3 
10 

6 



11 

371 
306 
85 
78 
42 
3 



31 
494 
32 
28 
22 
19 



239 
426 



9 

220 



51 



110 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



TABLE 76 

Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland County Schools: 1943-1952 



Ykar 



New to Counties 



Number 



Per Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 

of 
Teach- 
ing Posi- 
tions 
October 

to 

October 



Number New to County Who Were 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 



But 
New 

to 
State 



In 


1 


Counties 


From 


But Not 


An- 


Teaching 


other 


Preced- 


County* 


ing Year 





From 
Other 
Type 
School 
in Same 
County* 



Other-t 



WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1942-43 . . 


565 


21.3 


+ 8 


272 




169 


124 


54 


5 




1943-44. . 


521 


19.4 


+42 


165 


10 


215 


131 


49 


5 


47 


1944-45. . 


553 


20.1 


+67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


10 


29 


1945-46 . . 


621 


22.7 


-52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


°50 


12 


47 


1946-47 . . 


712 


25.3 


+79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


°57 


15 


41 


1947-48 . . 


586 


19.6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


i59 


20 


32 


1948-49 . . 


646 


20.5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


Xo9 


26 


21 


1949-50 . . 


692 


20.3 


+264 


264 


21 


267 


136 


x43 


26 


33 


1950-51 . . 


831 


22.7 


+250 


350 


15 


303 


157 


z58 


9 


36 


1951-52 . . 


1,068 


25.8 


+478 


447 


10 


399 


206 


z95 


14 


47 








WHITE HIGH 


SCHOOL TEACHERS 








1942-43. . 


587 


32.9 


-19 


270 




237 


80 


61 


21 




1943-44 . . 


517 


28.7 


-55 


196 


6 


241 


74 


58 


27 


io 


1944-45 . . 


525 


29.0 


+ 16 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


24 


15 


1945-46 . . 


779 


37.0 


+286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


116 


22 


1946-47. . 


763 


83.4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


J57 


53 


28 


1947-48. . 


675 


26.7 


+239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


y38 


43 


15 


1948-49 . . 


605 


22.4 


+ 168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


1/57 


22 


14 


1949-50. . 


722 


24.6 


+242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


°52 


42 


10 


1950-51. . 


912 


27.4 


+394 


603 


17 


223 


68 


°53 


19 


13 


1951-52 . . 


943 


26.0 


+289 


545 


1 


312 


79 


zl04 


29 


29 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1942-43 . . 


87 


14.7 


-9 


65 




9 


13 


9 






1943-44 . . 


120 


20.3 


-6 


81 


6 


18 


15 


9 




6 


1944-45. . 


132 


22.3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 




3 


1945-46. . 


108 


18.2 


-10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


1 


4 


1946-47. . 


104 


17.0 


+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


82 


6 


5 


1 


1947-48. . 


71 


11.7 


-5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


3 


6 


1948-49. . 


97 


15.1 


+35 


53 


4 


12 


27 


^9 


3 


3 


1949-50. . 


71 


10.9 


+ 11 


38 




11 


22 


4 


3 


7 


1950-51 . . 


76 


11.5 


+8 


39 


5 


14 


18 


6 


2 


2 


1951-52 . . 


94 


13.6 


+32 


52 


3 


18 


21 


11 


4 


6 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1942-43. . 


65 


32.8 


+5 


49 




10 


6 


11 


2 




1943-44. . 


79 


37.4 


+ 15 


52 


5 


19 


3 


4 


1 


i 


1944-45. . 


90 


43.1 


+7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 






1945-46. . 


96 


37.0 


+43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


"12 


ii 




1946-47. . 


104 


35.3 


+35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


10 


1 


1947-48. . 


110 


32.3 


+46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


10 




1948-49 . . 


98 


26.0 


+36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


4 


j 


1949-50. . 


102 


24.2 


+44 


68 




24 


9 


6 


5 




1950-51 . . 


153 


29.8 


+93 


93 




42 


18 


10 


10 




1951-52 . . 


139 


24.5 


+ 53 


91 




37 


11 


11 


4 





* Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

t Withdrawals during year who returned during the same year excluded from total number and per 
cent. 

° One transfer from Baltimore City is included in the total number and per cent. 

X Three transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 

1 Four transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
V Two transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 

2 Six transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 



118 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 77 

Number and Per Cent of White Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1951-52 

nil 





New To Cocntt 








Number New To Countt Who Were 














Chan ge 






















































in 

Number 


Inexperiencedb 








Experienced^ 








County 






of 






















Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Teaching 
Posi- 






Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to State* 










Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Yearf 




tions 
October 

to 
October 


From 
Mary- 
land 


From 
Other 
States 


From 
Mary- 
land 


From 
Other 
States 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pi 
ceding Year 


From 

Another 

CountyJ 


From Other 
Type Schoc 


in home 
County ti 


I otai otate 


tl,285 
245 


t22.3 
15.1 


-f-ouz 


'~ 575 


10 


443 


226 


117 




16 


55 
8 


rJaltimore tyity 
Elementary and 
Occupational . 


4-24 


140 




631 


20 


22 




2 


Total Counties . . . 


tl,068 


{25, 8 


+ 478 


250 


185 


10 


163 


217 


206 


95 




14 


47 


Allegany 


22 


8.3 


+ 2 


13 


1 








7 


1 






3 


Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore 


101 

236 


32.8 
31.4 


+ 44 
+ 104 


16 
78 


26 
45 




21 
24 


\7 
23 
2 


16 

34 


3 

aaa26 






3 


Calvert 


7 


25.0 


+2 


1 




1 


2 


1 








Caroline 


16 


30.8 


+ 7 


'2 


3 






2 


6 


3 








Carroll 


30 


21.6 


+ 10 


5 


4 




1 


5 


9 


5 






1 


Cecil 


31 


30.1 


+ 12 


6 


4 




2 


9 


7 


a3 






2 


Charles 


26 


46.4 


+7 


7 


2 




2 


6 


7 


2 






1 


Frederick 


8 
20 


11.3 
12.8 


+ 5 
+ 6 


2 
2 


3 




'2 


'2 


5 
10 


1 
1 






1 
1 




14 


14.4 


— 5 


4 


I 




1 


4 


3 


1 






2 


Harford 


46 


27.1 


+24 


12 


13 




4 


9 


5 


2 






1 


Howard 


22 


31.0 


+ 10 
+2 


3 


5 




2 


4 


5 


3 






1 


Kent 


3 


8.1 




2 




1 














Montgomery . . . 


230 


35.1 


+ 118 


37 




■7 


63 


53 


24 


i5 






is 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 


219 
7 

15 


39.1 
16.3 
34.9 


+ 72 
+ 5 
-1 


34 
3 


24 
43 


1 
1 


27 
1 
2 


63 
6 


26 
1 
2 


al5 
1 

a3 




5 


9 


Somerset 


15 


30.6 


+ 7 


4 


i 








4 


3 








Talbot 


17 


34.7 


+ 8 

+20 
+ 13 


4 


3 




'2 


'4 


3 


1 








Washington 

Wicomico 


40 
24 
8 


14.8 
22.4 


7 
9 


1 

3 




5 
1 


6 
1 


19 
8 


'4 










15.1 


+ 6 


2 




1 


1 


3 


1 









* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in column one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers from Baltimore 
City to a county are included in totals and percentages. AU transfers are excluded from total and percentage for total State. 
a One transfer from Baltimore City. 

b Excludes a total of 12 inexperienced and 19 experienced t«achers for whom no information was available regarding their source, but 
who are included in the total and percentage for "new to county." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



TABLE 78 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers New 
to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1951-52 



New To County 



Num- 
ber 



Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Posi- 
tions 

October 
to 

October 



Number New To Countt Who Were 



[nexperiencedb 



From 
Marj'- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Esperiencedb 



But New to State* I 



From 


From 


Mary- 


Other 


land 


States 



©OS 

£ c o 



m »i S TT 
« ? C « 

-^1 1^1^ 





























Total Stale 


tl.029 


t21 





-1-314 


57 


7 




1 


336 


89 


119 


32 


33 


Baltimore City 






























Junior High .... 


76 


12 


1 


+ 18 


37 






20 


9 


10 


1 


4 


Senior Hieh. . . . 


27 


5 





+ 7 










13 


1 


4 






Vocational 


4 


3 


3 




2 








1 




1 


2 




Total Counties. . 


t943 


t26 





+ 289 


269 




260 


1 


91 


211 


79 


104 


29 


29 


Allegany 


50 


17 


2 


+ 10 


15 




8 




6 


8 




4 






Anne Arunde 1 . . 


69 


27 


4 


+ 7 


8 




20 




13 


17 




6 


i 


2 


Baltimore 


184 


30 


4 


+ 77 


70 




47 




13 


14 


I 


uaaa30 


7 


4 




12 


44 


4 


+ 3 






3 




2 


5 


1 




1 




Caroline 


14 


23 


3 


-1 


4 




5 






4 


1 






2 


CarroU 


51 


33 


3 


+ 5 


18 




11 




2 


10 


5 


4 






Cecil 


30 


26 


8 


+2 


5 




13 




2 


9 










Charles 


25 


41 





+3 


3 




6 




8 


4 


4 






Dorchester 


24 


34 


3 




7 




8 


. i '2 


2 


3 


2 








38 


21 


3 


tl 


14 




4 


I 1 


7 


9 


3 






(larrett 


25 


29 


8 


+ 5 






6 




1 


10 






2 


2 


Harford 


40 


29 


9 


+ 5 


13 




14 




1 


6 


i 


3 






Howard 


19 


27 


1 


+ 2 


5 




5 




2 


4 




2 




• 


Kent 


9 


23 


1 


-1 


1 




1 




1 


4 


2 








Montgomery . . . 


132 


29 


3 


+ 69 


24 




18 


1 


18 


42 


11 


i5 


5 




Prince George's. 


187 


39 





+ 78 


41 




57 




15 


46 


13 


10 


5 




Queen Anne's . . 


n 


24 





+ 2 


4 




2 






1 


1 


a3 






St. Mary's 


20 


58 


8 





3 




8 




2 


3 


1 




1 




Somerset 


12 


26 


1 


-1 


4 




3 






2 


2 


i 






Talbot 


16 


33 


3 









9 






3 


1 


1 


1 




Washington .... 


47 


17 


8 


+ 13 


18 




6 




6 


6 


2 


8 


2 




Wicomico 


12 


19 


7 


+2 


1 




1 




1 




1 


a7 






Worcester 


14 


24 


1 


+2 


4 




5 




3 




1 


1 







* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Fixcluded from all totals in colunms one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers from Baltimore 
City are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total and percentage for total State. 
a One transfer from Baltimore City. 

6 Excludes a total of 16 inexperienced and 10 experienced teachers for whom no information was available but who are included in 
totals and percentages of "new to county." 



120 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 79 

Number and Per Cent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1951-52 



COXTNTT 



New To County 



Num- 



Per 
Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Posi- 
tions 

October 
to 

October 



Number New To County Who Were 



Inexperienceda 



From 
Mary- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 



But New to State* 



From 
Mary- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 

























Total State 


tl63 


t9.9 


+56 


94 


3 


22 




42 


14 


5 


24 


Batimore City 




























Elementary and 




























Occupational . 


72 


7.5 


+24 


44 






4 




21 


3 


1 


18 


Total Counties . . . 


t94 


n3.6 


+32 


34 


16 


3 


5 




13 


21 


11 


4 


6 


Allegany 





0.0 

























Anne Arundel . . 


9 


10.7 


+ 3 


4 


2 










'2 


"i 






Baltimore 


7 


9.9 


+ 1 


4 


1 












2 






Calvert 


9 


31.0 





2 


2 












1 






Caroline 


2 


12.5 


+ 1 






i 








i 








Carroll 


1 


11.1 


+ 1 


1 
















1 




Cecil 


2 


22.2 





1 














i 






Charles 


12 


24.0 


+4 




i 




'2 






'4 


1 




'3 


Dorchester 


3 


9.7 





"l 












1 






1 


Frederick 


2 


11.8 





1 


i 


















Garrett 




























Harford 


i 


5"3 


+1 














i 








Howard 


4 


20.0 


+1 




2 




1 






1 








Kent 


2 


12.5 


+1 


2 




















Montgomery. . . 


6 


12.5 


+ 4 


2 












'3 


i 


i 




Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 


22 


19.8 


+ 8 


9 


3 








4 


3 


1 


2 


2 





0.0 


-1 






















St. Mary's 


1 


4.5 


-1 


i 




















Somerset 


3 


11.5 


-1 


1 


i 




i 














Talbot 


6 


24.0 


+ 2 


1 






1 




'2 


'2 








Washington .... 


2 


33.3 


+ 1 


1 


1 


















Wicomico 


10 


27.0 


+7 


1 


2 








i 


'3 


'3 






Worcester 


1 


3.8 





1 





















0« ^ 2 



ill 

b C O 



"2^ 

<» b ^ L> 

•.^ 3:5 3 



• Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group and total State, 
a Excludes two county teachers for whom no information was available regarding their source, but who are included in the total and 
percentage of "new to county.' 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



TABLE 80 

Number and Per Cent of Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers New 
to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1951-52 



County 



New To County 



Num- 
ber 



Per 
Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Posi- 
tions 

October 
to 

! October 



Number New To County Who Were 



Inexperienceda 



From 
Mary- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 



Experienceda 



But New to State* 



From 
Mary- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 



.2 ^ !5 
^ tt a. 
§ o.S>< 



ill 



i- t* c UiC 



3iS 



Total State 

Baltimore City 

Junior High . . . 
Senior High . . . 
Vocational .... 

Total Countes 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

CarroU 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



tlTl 



31 
3 
1 

{139 


9 
20 



tl6.7 



12.0 
2.3 
1.5 

{24.5 

0.0 
14.7 
33.9 
30.0 
50.0 

62.5 
40.0 
40.0 
9.5 
42.9 



32.0 
5.9 
31.3 
17.8 

21.0 
29.4 
31.3 
37.5 
26.3 

50.0 
8.7 
26.9 



+ 81 



+21 
+6 
+ 1 

+53 



+ 4 

+ 10 
+3 



-1 
+ 7 
+ 1 
+ 1 



+ 1 

+2 
+7 

+ 12 
+ 1 
+ 1 
+2 



+ 1 
+ 1 



107 



* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from ail totals in columns one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group and total State. 
a Excludes a total of 6 inexperienced and 2 experienced teachers for whom no information was available regarding their source, but who 
are included in totals and percentages for "new to county." 



122 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 81 

Source of New Teachers : Counties of Maryland 1951-1952 





Total 


Experienced 


Inexperienced 


COXJNTY 




Recruited from 


Recruited from 


Recruited from 




Total* 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 



WHITE TEACHERS 



Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

G-iri^tt 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



2,130 


1,257 


873 


738 


428 


519 


445 


72 


55 


17 


27 


8 


28 


9 


168 


88 


80 


64 


34 


24 


46 


410 


281 


129 


133 


37 


148 


92 


18 


7 


11 


7 


7 




4 


34 


20 


14 


14 


6 


6 


8 


79 


49 


30 


26 


15 


23 


15 


60 


25 


35 


14 


18 


11 


17 


51 


29 


22 


19 


14 


10 


8 


32 


22 


10 


13 


2 


9 


8 


58 


42 


16 


26 


9 


16 


7 


38 


17 


21 


6 


14 


11 


7 


83 


41 


42 


16 


15 


25 


27 


40 


22 


18 


14 


8 


8 


10 


12 


5 


7 


4 


4 


1 


3 


344 


207 


137 


146 


95 


61 


42 


390 


181 


209 


106 


109 


75 


100 


17 


14 


3 


7 


1 


7 


2 


31 


13 


18 


10 


9 


3 


9 


22 


14 


8 


6 


2 


8 


6 


29 


12 


17 


8 


7 


4 


10 


86 


65 


21 


40 


12 


25 


9 


34 


32 


2 


22 


1 


10 


1 


22 


16 


6 


10 


1 


6 


5 



COLORED TEACHERS 



Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil . . . . . . 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



242 



142 



100 


67 


40 


75 


60 


6 


6 


3 


6 


3 


9 


8 


3 


9 


6 


10 


1 


8 


4 


2 


3 


2 




4 


3 


2 


2 




2 


2 


2 


2 




2 


2 


9 


12 


4 


4 


5 


2 


1 




2 


2 


3 


1 




4 


3 


4 


3 


i 


2 


3 


3 


2 






3 


3 




i 


3 


2 


6 


4 


4 


3 


2 


18 


5 


8 


12 


10 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


4 




4 


2 




3 


■4 


4 


6 


'2 


1 


2 


2 




1 


4 


1 


4 


7 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


4 


1 



* Excludes a total of 67 teachers (57 white, 10 colored) for whom no information is available and 14 
substitutes (11 white, 3 colorodK Includes a total of 221 teachers (199 white, 22 colored) who transferred 
between counties, or city and counties. i , , ^-r 

Note: The "permanent home address," as listed on the teacher's application blank for a certificate 
has been usei as the factor for determining the "source of teachers." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 82 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal; 

Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



State of 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 



County 


White Elementary Schools* 


White 
High 
Schools 


Colored Schools 


All Ele- 
mentary 


One- 
teacher 


Two- 
teacher 


Three- 
teacher 


Graded 


Ele- 
mentary* 


High 


State Average 


32.1 










32.3 


21 


.4 


32.9 


23.1 


Baltimore City 


32.0 










32.0 


21 


.3 


32.7 


25.6 




32.1 


21.5 


25 


.4 


29.4 


32.5 


21 


.5 


33.2 


20.9 


Allegany 


29.9 




20 


.3 


27.1 


30.3 


23 


.6 


32.0 


17.0 


Anne Arundel 


32.6 




24 


.2 


33.6 


32.6 


22 


.0 


34.0 


24.3 


Baltimore 


33.2 








t25 .5 


33.3 


24 


.0 


34.0 


22.8 


Calvert 


31.0 




ti2 


2 


t31.3 


32.6 


21 


.1 


35.3 


21.0 


Caroline 


31.1 




25 


.8 


t29.5 


31.5 


18 


.4 


37.0 


19.3 


Carroll 


31.3 




25 


5 


31.4 


19 


.5 


33.5 


17.7 


Cecil 


34.0 


34 '.5 


26 







34.6 


19 


.6 


31.2 


18.9 




30.5 










30.5 


18 


.7 


30.3 


19.4 




27.8 


16.3 


20 


4 


24.5 


32.1 


19 


.1 


35.4 


19.0 


Frederick 


36.2 


tl8.4 


24 


8 


29.3 


37.3 


21 


.8 


39.2 


22.4 


Garrett 


30.7 


23.2 


27 


9 


t35.8 


33.2 


19 


.8 






Harford 


32.6 


t28.6 


30 


3 


t32.7 


32.8 


22 


.0 


36.4 


ii'.s 


Howard 


31.9 




t27 


5 




32.0 


18 


.4 


29.6 


19.4 


Kent 


29.8 




26 


6 




30.7 


17 


.5 


31.0 


18.3 


Montgomery 


32.1 


t28'.2 


t38 


6 


29.4 


32.1 


20 


.0 


34.1 


19.2 




33.0 


t9.0 


t32 


1 


t32.0 


33.0 


22 





30.9 


23.3 




28.1 


20.4 


24 


2 


23.1 


30.3 


18 


5 


30.0 


17.8 




30.3 


t21.3 


23 


9 




33.2 


21 


8 


32.3 


19.4 




27.9 


18.0 


21 


2 


t27'.4 


29.0 


18 


3 


35.2 


23.6 


Talbot 


29.4 


t23.5 


28 


2 


f29.7 


29.6 


19 


5 


31.4 


19.7 


Washington 


30.7 


23.6 


26 


1 


29.7 


30.9 


21 


8 


29.6 


14.8 


Wicomico 


32.4 




27 


1 


30.5 


32.8 


22 


4 


33.4 


20.4 


Worcester 


29.3 




24 







30.0 


18 


4 


37.2 


21.4 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t One school only. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and X. 



124 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 83 

Average Number of Pupils Belonging per Maryland County Teacher and Principal; 

1943-1952 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 


White 


Colored 


Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1943 


36.8 


23.0 


36.3 


25.4 




1944 


36.5 


22.9 


36.1 


24.7 




1945 


36.0 


23.1 


36.1 


24.3 




1946 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25.5 




1947 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 




1948 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23.1 




1949 


34.0 


21.6 


34.7 


22.7 




1950 


34.0 


21.9 


35.1 


22.5 




1951 


33.7 


21.9 


34.7 


21.2 




1952 


32.1 


21.5 


33.2 


20.9 





* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

TABLE 84 

Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1952 



Year Ending 
June 30 



Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 



White 



Colored 





Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 990 


$ 1.436 


$ 513 


$ 906 


1928 


1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1933 


1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 




1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1942 


1.427 


1,639 


1.124 


1,290 




1,539 




1,291 


1,450 


1944 


1,805 


1,997 


1,551 


1,705 




1,862 


2,042 


1.599 


1,719 


1946 


2.027 


2,183 


1,737 


1,845 


1947 


2.306 


2.439 


2.002 


2,100 


1948 


3,234 


3,446 


3,157 


3,178 


1949 


3,236 


3,318 


2,916 


2,885 




3.342 


3,344 


3.023 


2,888 


19^1 


3,418 


3,359 


3,126 


2.934 


1952 


3,637 


3,646 


3,385 


3,272 



Maryland State Department of Education 



1 1 1 ill! Illi llli lllll III 



125 



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126 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



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128 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 88 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in Maryland County One-Teacher Schools*; 

1943-1952 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year 

Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 


1945 


3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3 .2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 


1950 


3,432 


64 


1.9 


655 


63 


9.6 


1951 


3,696 
4,164 


54 


1.5 


663 


49 


7.4 


1952 


40 


1.0 


696 


35 


5.0 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



TABLE 89— Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



County 


Schools for 


White Pupils 


Schools for Colored Pupils 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 




40 


1.0 


861 


0.6 


35 


5.0 


1,065 


4.6 


Allegany 










1 


20.0 


32 


20.0 


Anne Arundel 


















Baltimore 


















Calvert 










'5 


17.2 


168 


16.4 






































Cecil 


3 


2 '.9 


104 


2.9 










Charles 










■3 


5 '.'7 


loi 


6'3 


Dorchester 


ii 


15.5 


179 


9.1 


6 


19.4 


147 


13.4 


Frederick 




0.6 


18 


0.3 


3 


17.6 


85 


12.7 




14 


14.6 


325 


11.0 










Harford 


1 


0.6 


29 


0.5 




















i 


5.6 


35 


5.9 


Kent 










2 


12.5 


96 


19.4 


Montgomery 


i 


0.2 


28 


o'.i 










Prince George's 


1 


0.2 


9 


t 




43.8 


203 


42.5 




2 


4.7 


41 


3.4 


'7 


St. Mary's 


1 


2.3 


21 


1.6 


2 


9.1 


57 


8.0 


Somerset 


2 


4.1 


36 


2.6 










Talbot 


1 


2.0 


24 


1.7 


■3 


12.2 


si 


10.5 


Washington 


2 


0.7 


47 


0.6 






60 














'2 


5.5 


4'. 9 


Worcester 



















* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight, 
t Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 90 — Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City: 
Number of Teachers and Principals: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Number 




City 




idel 


























Montgomery 


jrge's 


m 


St. Mary's 












OF 

Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


All Schools 


Baltimore 


Allegany 


Anne Arur 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchestei 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Prince Ge( 


Queen Am 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washingtc 


Wicomico 


Worcester 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


a568 


78 


34 


30 


46 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


24 


26 


34 


20 


8 


8 


49 


48 


13 


11 


10 


10 


37 


15 


10 


1.0- 1.4 


54 




004 


*1 






1 


*°3 


4 




12 


1 


14 


1 






1 


t2 


3 


1 


2 


*2 


2 






1.5- 2.4. .. . 


66 




2 


1 




"i 


1 




5 




3 


4 


10 


4 




'4 


1 


t3 


t3 


6 


3 


t2 


7 


"2 


■3 


2.5- 3.4 


34 




2 


3 


i 


1 










4 


2 


1 


1 




1 


4 


1 


2 






1 


6 


3 




3.5- 4.4 


47 


'i 


2 


3 


6 








'2 


i 


1 


7 


4 


1 




1 


2 


1 


2 


i 






5 


2 


■3 


4.5- 5.4 


30 


3 


1 




2 


2 


"i 


i 


1 






3 


1 


3 






2 


4 


2 




i 


'3 








5.5- 6.4. .. . 


31 


1 


5 


'2 


2 




1 


1 


2 


"2 




1 










2 


4 




i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6.5- 7.4 


27 


2 


4 


1 


2 




2 


5 


1 






1 


i 








2 






1 






3 


2 




7.5- 8.4 


27 


1 


3 


2 


3 






2 




i 




2 


1 


i 






3 


i 










2 


1 


'2 


8.5- 9.4 


18 


2 


2 


1 


2 




i 


1 










1 


1 


"i 




1 


2 






1 




1 






9.5-10.4 


18 






3 


3 








"i 










1 


2 




1 


2 


i 




1 






i 




10.5-11.4. . . . 


19 


6 


'2 




1 






i 




i 










1 




2 


2 






1 










11.5-12.4 


17 




1 


i 


1 






1 








'2 




"2 






1 


3 










3 






12.5-13.4. . . . 


22 


5 


1 


3 










i 










1 






3 


5 




1 










i 


13.5-14.4. . . . 


20 


3 


1 


2 


'3 






i 


1 










2 






4 


1 










1 


1 




14.5-15.4 


17 


2 


1 


1 


1 














"i 










7 


2 










1 


1 




15.5-16.4 


12 


2 


1 


1 
















2 










2 


3 










1 






16.5-17.4 


9 


5 




1 


i 
























1 














"i 




17.5-18.4 


15 


8 






1 
























2 


3 
















18.5-19.4. . . . 


12 


2 




'2 


1 


















"i 






2 


3 








1 








19.5-20.4 


11 


4 






1 








i 
















2 


1 










2 






20 .5 and over 


62 


30 


'2 


'2 


15 










i 








i 






4 


5 










1 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . 



18.5-19.4 
19.5-20.4 
20 .5 and over 



a250 51 2 23 12 13 



3 16 11 8 



tt3 
3 
2 



23 



10 

*°6 



a Includes a total of fourteen grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but ofTer a junior school cur- 
riculum: white — two in Allegany and ten in Baltimore; colored — one in Baltimore and one in Carroll. 
* Includes one school having a two-teacher organization. 
° Includes two schools having a two-teacher organization, 
t Includes one school having a graded organization. 



130 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 91 — Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City: 
Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1952 







City 




T3 


























>. 

u 


rge's 










c 






Average 


on 


I i> 




C 

a 


a 
























0/ 

H 


s 


s 
c 








o 


o 




Number 


o 


o 


>, 


u 


o 












1 


u 










a 


o 


< 


*>> 






M 


_u 


<u 


Belonging 


All Sch 


Baltim 


c 

ClJ 

< 


Anne A 


Baltim 


Calvert 


Carolir 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorche 


Frederi 


Garreti 


Harfon 


Howan 


Kent 


Montg« 


Prince 


Queen 


St. Ma 


Somera 


Talbot 


Washir 


Wicom 


Worcea 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


568 


78 


34 


30 


46 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


24 


26 


34 


20 


8 


g 


49 


48 


13 


11 


10 


10 


37 


15 


10 


25 or less . . . 


41 




4 


1 




1 


1 


2 


1 




11 




10 










2 


2 


1 


3 




1 






26- 


50. . . . 


43 




2 










1 


5 




4 


2 


8 


2 




2 


2 


1 


3 


5 






3 


i 


i 


51- 


100 


65 


i 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 




3 




4 


4 


7 


4 


i 


3 


4 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


10 


3 


3 


101- 


150 


52 


1 


3 


4 


4 


2 




i 


1 


i 


1 


5 


3 




1 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 




4 


6 


3 


2 


151- 


200 


64 


5 


4 




2 


1 


i 


1 


2 


1 




5 


2 


3 






20 


6 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 




1 


201- 


250 


55 


2 


6 


4 


4 




3 


5 


3 


2 


i 


1 


1 


2 


2 


i 


8 


2 








1 


3 


3 


1 


251- 


300 


32 


4 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 






1 


1 


1 




1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 






301- 


350 


25 


4 


2 


1 


4 


i 




1 




i 




2 


1 


i 


1 






3 


i 




1 




1 






351- 


400 


31 


4 


3 


2 






i 


1 


i 




2 






4 


1 


i 


i 


6 










3 


i 




401- 


450 


26 


3 


2 


3 


4 






1 


1 






i 


i 


1 






3 


2 




1 






2 




i 


451- 


500 


14 


4 




1 


1 






1 












1 








4 












i 




501- 


550 


21 


8 




2 


1 








1 






1 










2 


3 












2 




551- 


600. . . . 


18 


4 


"i 


2 


2 














1 










2 


5 










1 






601- 


650. . . . 


17 


9 
























1 


1 




1 


3 








1 


1 






651- 


700. . . . 


11 


3 






2 








1 


















1 










1 






701- 


750. . . . 


7 


1 






4 


























1 
















751- 


800 


11 


6 




1 


2 










1 
















1 
















801- 


850. . . . 


10 


6 






1 






1 


















1 


1 
















851- 


900 


8 


5 






1 


















1 
























901- 


950 


3 


3 
















































951- 


1000 


4 


2 






2 










































1051- 


1100 


1 


































1 
















1101- 


1150. . . . 


2 


1 






1 










































1151- 


1200. . . . 


1 








1 










































1251- 


1300. . . . 


2 


1 






1 










































1351- 


1400 


3 


1 






2 










































1701 and over 


1 








1 











































ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



AH Schools . . 


250 


51 


2 


23 


12 


13 


4 


2 


3 


16 


11 


8 




3 


9 


6 


11 


23 


9 


7 


9 


10 


1 


9 


8 


25 or less . . 


12 










2 










4 


1 














3 


1 




1 








26- 


- 50 


43 


3 


1 


3 




4 








4 


3 


2 






4 


3 




3 


4 


2 




5 




1 


1 


51- 


- 100 


77 


1 




13 


6 


3 






2 


8 




4 




i 


3 


2 


6 


12 


1 


2 


6 






3 


4 


101- 


- 150 


27 


3 


"i 




1 


2 


2 


i 


1 


1 


i 








2 




3 








2 


'2 




4 




151 


- 200 


18 






1 




2 


2 


1 




2 


1 














3 








2 


i 




'2 


201- 


- 250. . . . 


11 


3 




3 














1 






1 




1 








"i 












251- 


- 300 


9 






1 


2 














i 












3 




1 










1 


301 


- 350. . . . 


9 


6 






1 


























1 
















351 


- 400 


8 


5 
















1 








1 
























401- 


- 450 


2 


2 
















































451- 


- 500 


2 






1 


1 










































501- 


- 550 


4 


3 


















1 






























551- 


- 600 


4 


3 












































1 




601 


- 650 


3 


3 
















































651 


- 700 


1 


1 
















































701- 


- 750. . . . 


7 


5 
































1 
















801- 


- 850 


3 


3 
















































851- 


- 900 


1 


1 
















































951- 


-1000 


1 


















































1001- 


-1050 


2 


2 
















































1051- 


-1100 


1 


1 
















































1101- 


1150 


1 


1 
















































1201- 


1250. . . . 


1 


1 
















































1251- 


1300. . . . 




1 
















































1301- 


1350 




















































1451 and over 


1 



















































Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 92 — Number of Maryland White Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
and White Junior High Schools by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers: 

Year Ending June 30, 1952 







>. 

O 




13 

'V 




























00 

bfi 


m 
'a 








c 






Number 

OF 

Teachers 


All Schools 


Baltimore * 


Allegany 


Anne Arun 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


< 'haries 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgome 


Prince Geo 


Queen Ann 


">> 


Somerset 


Talbot 


o 

C 
m 

e 


Wicomico 


Worcester 


Grand Total . . 


*178 


27 


10 


9 


14 


1 


5| 




8 


6 


7 


8 


5 




4 


4 


13 


13 


3 


2 


5 


3 


1 


4 


4 



Itl 



junior-senior, senior and VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 


125 


14 


8 


4 


8 


1 


5 


8 


6 


2 


6 


6 


5 


4 


4 


3 


7 


8 


3 


2 


4 


3 


6 


4 


4 


1.5- 2.4 


1 




















1 






























3.5- 4.4. . . . 


2 




















1 


























1 




4.5- 5.4 


3 












1 




























1 


1 








5.5- 6.4 


2 




















1 


























1 




6.5- 7.4 


4 




















1 










1 










1 






1 




7.5- 8.4 


3 


1 










1 




































i 


8.5-10.4 


6 




1 












2 






1 


1 






1 




















9.5-10.4. . . . 


4 




1 










1 




i 


















1 














10.5-11.4. . . . 


2 














2 




































11.5-12.4 


4 


1 


1 












1 








1 


























12.5-13.4. . . . 


2 


1 














































1 


13.5-14.4. . . . 


5 


1 












1 






1 


1 










1 


















14.5-15.4. . . . 


7 












2 


1 














1 








1 


1 




1 








15.5-16.4 


4 














1 














1 




1 








i 










16.5-17.4. . . . 


6 






1 






1 


1 










1 
















1 








1 


17.5-18.4. . . . 


2 




























1 
















1 






18.5-19.4 


3 








1 


























1 




1 












19 .5-20.4 


5 






















1 






1 






1 










1 




1 


20 .5 and over 


60 


10 


5 


3 


7 


1 




1 


3 


1 


1 


3 


2 


'4 




i 


5 


6 


1 






1 


4 


i 





JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



Tota 


53 


13 


2 


5 


6 






1 


2 


4 


1 


2 








1 


6 


5 






1 




4 






1.0- 1.4 


1 








































1 










1.5- 2.4. .. . 


1 






























1 




















3.5- 4.4. . . . 


5 














1 


2 


1 


























1 






4.5- 5.4 


3 






1 


1 










1 
































5.5- 6.4 


4 


i 


i 




1 










1 
































6.5- 7.4. .. . 


1 








1 










































7.5- 8.4. . . . 


1 






















1 




























9.5-10.4 


2 






1 












































10.5-11.4 


1 




i 














































12.5-13.4.... 


1 


















1 
































13.5-14.4 


1 


















































14.5-15.4 


1 


1 
















































16.5-17.4 


































1 


















17.5-1.84 


1 


1 
















































20 .5 and over 


29 


10 




3 


2 














1 










5 












3 







* Excludes a total of twelve seventh grades which are housed in elementarj' school buildings but offer a junior high 
school curriculum: two in Allegany county and ten in Baltimore County. 



132 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 93 — Number of Maryland White Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
and White Junior High Schools by County and Baltimore City — Average Number Belonging: 

Year Ending June 30, 1952 







City 




% 
13 




























rge's 1 


DO 

"in 








c 






Average 
Number 


"o 
o 


<v 
o 




^run 


a; 
ii 
o 
























E 

O 


Geo 


Ann 


ry's 






o 
tc 


o 


« 


Belonging 




Itim 


c 

rt 
tc 


C 


Itim 


Iveri 


.2 


rroll 


'C 


ca 


£: 




rret1 


rfon 


war( 




>ntg( 


nee 


een 


Ma 


OQ 
0) 

s 


o 


c 
IS 

tn 


s 

o 


irces 




< 


CS 

m 


< 


c 

< 


cS 
« 


es 
O 


u 


U 


O 


JS 

U 


o 
Q 




cS 

O 


w 


o 
M 






*C 


& 


w 


o 


"ca 
Eh 








Grand Total. . 


*178 


27 


*10 


9 


♦14 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


4 


4 


4 


13 


13 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 



JUNION-SENIOR, senior and VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 


125 


50 or less . . . 


1 


51- 100 


8 


101- 150 


9 


151- 200 


11 


201- 250. '. '. '. 


9 


251- 300 


10 


301- 350 


11 


351- 400 


7 


401- 5oo; ; ! ! 


8 


4^1- 500 


7 


501- 550 


3 


551- 600 


3 


601- 650 


4 


651- 700 


1 


701- 750 


1 


751- 800 


1 


801- 850 


3 


851- 900. .. . 


2 


901- 950. .. . 


1 


1001-1050 


2 


1101-1150. . . . 


1 


1201-1250 


3 


1251-1300 


2 


1301-1350 


2 


1351-1400 


2 


1451-1500 


2 


1501-1550 


1 


1551-1600 


2 


1701-1750 


2 


1801 and over 


6 



14 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 

50 or less . . 

51- 100 

101- 150 

151- 200 

201- 250 

301- 350 

351- 400. .. . 
401- 450. .. . 

451- 500 

501- 550 

551- 600 

601- 650. .. . 

651- 700 

701- 750 

751- 800 

801- 850 

851- 900. .. . 
901- 950 . .. . 
951-1000. . . . 
1001-1050 

1101-1150 

1151-1200 

1251-1300 

1451-1500 

1801 and over 



* Excludes a total of twelve seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior school 
curriculum; two in Allegany County and ten in Baltimore County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 94 — Number of Maryland Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High 
Schools by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers; and by County and Baltimore 
City — Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Number 

OF 




City 




'V 


























b 


1 rge's 


09 

"a; 








C 






Teachers 

Average 
Number 


Schools 


Itimore 


>. 
c 
a 


ne Arun 


Itimore 


Ivert 


roline 


rroll 


1 


arlea 


rchester 


jderick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


c 


)nt.gome 


nee Geo 


c 
c 

<: 

g 

V 


Mary's 


[nerset 


Ibot 


ishinK" 


o 

s 

o 
y 


u 

0) 

D) 


Belonging 


< 


m 


< 


c 
< 


m 


U 


u 


U 


O 


JS 


c 
Q 


u 


c« 
O 


cs 


o 
K 








3 

o* 




o 


<D 
Eh 






O 


Grand Total. . 


t42 


8 


1 




t3 


1 


1 


tl 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 




3 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY NUMBER OF TEACHERS S 
I 



3.0- 3.4 


2 
































*1 














*1 


4.5- 5.4 


2 






































1 










*1 


5.5- 6.4.... 


1 




1 














































6.5- 7.4 


1 














1 




































7.5- 8.4. .. . 


1 










































1 






8.5- 9.4 


1 


































*1 
















9.5-10.4 


4 








1 








1 










1 














1 










10.5-11.4 


2 


1 




































1 












13.5-14.4. . . . 


1 






















1 




























14.5-15.4 


2 


























1 














1 










15.5-16.4. . . . 


3 








1 










1 
































16.5-17.4 


4 












1 
















1 




1 




1 














17.5-18.4 


2 


















1 






























1 


18.5-19.4 


1 










1 








































19.5-20.4. . . . 


1 










































1 












**♦ 
















































20 .5 and over 


14 


7 




1 


1 












1 












*1 


2 












Ij .. 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY AVERAGE NUMBER BELONGING 



51- 100. . . . 


3 


































*i 




1 










*i 


101- 150 


5 




1 










1 




















*i 










1 




*i 


151- 200 


3 








1 








1 










1 
























201- 250 


3 


1 




































1 


1 










251- 300 


4 


























1 




1 


1 


















301- 350. . . . 


7 








1 




1 






2 










i 








1 












1 


351- 400. .. . 


4 










i 










1 




















1 


1 








451- 500 


3 


1 






























*i 














1 




551- 600 




































1 
















701- 750. .. . 


1 








1 










































751- 800. .. . 


1 


1 
















































851- 900 


1 


*1 
















































1001-1050. . . . 


1 


































1 
















1201-1250 


1 


*1 
















































1451 and over 




*3 




1 













































t Excludes one seventh grade in Baltimore County and one in Carroll County which are housed in elementary schoo' 
buildings but offer a junior high school curriculum. 
* Each asterisk represents one junior high school. 



134 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 95 



Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment by Subject: 
Counties of Maryland: 1951-52 



County 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 




490 


18,280 


621 


4,413 


2,394 


4.339 


6,513 





WHITE ADULTS 



Total Counties 


440 


16,536 


535 


3,966 


1,833 


3,911 


6,271 


Allegany 


60 


2,118 


292 


887 


212 


265 


462 


Anne Arundel .... 


13 


462 


22 


63 


44 


196 


117 


Baltimore 


86 


2,103 




245 


1,002 


476 


380 


Calvert 


3 


46 








18 


28 




2 


32 








16 


16 


Carroll 


6 


225 




■46 


25 


55 


105 


Cecil 


4 


109 








85 


24 


Charles 


3 


96 








62 


34 




9 


179 


is 






52 


109 




2 


103 








68 


35 




6 


123 








22 


101 


Harford 


41 


1,760 


ii7 


274 


225 


707 


437 




10 


175 


37 






40 


98 


Kent 


3 


96 










96 


Montgomery 


80 


5,558 


49 


1,883 


i29 


eii 


2,880 


Prince George's . . . 


51 


2,222 




516 


146 


750 


810 




2 


31 








17 


14 


St. Mary's 


4 


139 






■56 


89 




Somerset 


5 


77 








12 


65 


Talbot 


10 


211 








82 


129 


Washington 


32 


490 




■58 




151 


281 




6 


131 








81 


50 




2 


50 








50 





COLORED ADULTS 



Total Counties 


50 


1,744 


86 


447 


561 


428 


242 


Allegany 


1 


13 




13 








Anne Arundel .... 


10 


269 




89 


164 


"si 


*45 


Baltimore 


8 


130 




49 




45 


36 


Calvert 
















Caroline 
































Cecil 


















"i 


'45 








'45 






2 


109 








75 




















Garrett 
















Harford 


" 3 


i63 




i33 


'36 






Howard 


3 


42 










32 


Kent 


1 


21 




'21 






"ie 


Montgomery 


1 


16 








i36 


Prince George's . . . 


11 


248 




66 




46 
















St. Mary's 
















Somerset 
















Talbot 


"i 


'84 




■42 








Washington 


2 


504 




34 


427 


■43 


■35 


Wicomico 


3 


55 








20 


Worcester 


3 


45 








13 


32 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 96 

Adult Education Program: Titles of Courses Offered: Counties of Maryland: 

1951-1952 



Title of Course 



Number 
of Classes 



Title of Course 



Number 
of Classes 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Construction and Repair of Farm 

Equipment 

Dairy Problems 

Dairy Production 

Farm Machinery 

Farm Mechanics 

Food Processing 

Home Beautification and Gardening 
Poultry Problems 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Food Preservation 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Home Furnishings and Decoration . 
Meal Preparation 

Total 

Trade and Industries 

Aircraft Materials 

Auto Mechanics 

Blue Print Reading 

Building Trades 

Drafting 

Electric Arc and Acetylene Welding 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Hours Control 

Machine Shop 

Master Lines 

Mechanical Drawing 

Motor Repair 

Radio and Television 

Related Instruction for Apprentices 

Slide Rule 

Sheet Metal 

Shop Mathematics 

Type for Printers 

Woodworking and Cabinetmaking . . 

Total 



139 
12 
46 
5 
14 
3 

219 



1 
2 

29 
6 
1 

10 
2 
7 
1 

11 
2 
3 
1 

12 
4 
1 
1 
5 
1 

16 

116 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business Education . 

Shorthand 

Typing 



Total . 



General 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Ceramics 

Child Growth and Development 

Dramatics 

Driver Education 

English 

Fashion Modeling 

Fundamentals 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Interior Decorating 

Jewelry . 

Landscaping 

Leadership Training 

Lipreading 

Mathematics 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal 

Nursing and First Aid 

Physical Education 

Portrait Photography 

Psychology 

Recreation 

Sewing 

Shop 

Speech 

Woodwork and Metalcraft 



Total. 



4 
40 
113 

165 



40 

287 



136 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 97— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: 

1951 and 1952 



Baltimore City : 



Type of Class 


Net Roll, February 


White 


Colored 


1951 


1952 


1951 


1962 




8,478 


9,097 


4,137 


4,455 




867 


880 






Elementary 


65 


71 


'556 


'508 




847 


1,039 


807 


1,162 


Commercial (Distributive Education) 


1,120 


1,670 


595 


859 


Vocational: 










Industrial 


381 


429 


244 


296 




612 


626 


887 


778 


Parent Education 


1,409 


1,353 


410 


445 


Industrial Training (General) 


185 


211 


26 


20 


Informal Program (Noncredit) 


1,787 


1,784 


15 


19 


Speech and Lip Reading Classes 


12 


11 


6 


5 


Vocational Education (Veterans) 


254 


157 


591 


363 


Foremanship and Apprentice Training 


939 


866 








385 


370 


172 


170 



TABLE 98— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1942-1951; and by 

Type of School: 1951 









Net Roll at End 


OP Term 
















Number 


Year 


Number 


Total 




Taking 


of 




of 


Enroll- 






Principals 


Type op School 


Schools 


ment 


Total 


Review 


Advance 


and 
Teachers 










Work 


Work 


All Schools 














1942 


15 


6,994 


6,154 


4,819 


1,335 


147 


1943 


14 


6,357 


5,483 


4,548 


935 


180 


1944 


13 


6,874 


5,976 


5,108 


868 


142 


1945 


13 


6,465 


5,750 


5,052 


698 


123 


1946 


12 


6,851 


6,159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949 


5 


4,222 


3,865 


3,275 


590 


92 




5 


4,010 


3,628 


2,990 


638 


78 


1951 


5 


4,145 


3,710 


3,258 


452 


80 


White Schools 


3 


2,845 


2,577 


2,327 


250 


56 




2 


2,664 


2,406 


2,327 


79 


48 


Senior 


1 


1,490 


1,359 


1,280 


79 


28 


Junior 


1 


1,174 


1,047 


1,047 




20 




1 


181 


171 




'iii 


8 


Colored Schools 


2 


1,300 


1,133 


931 


202 


24 


Secondary 


1 


1,133 


973 


931 


42 


16 


Senior 




382 


354 


312 


42 


8 


Junior 


} 1 


751 


619 


619 




8 


Demonstration 


1 


167 


160 




'ieo 


8 



* No elementary review schools beginning 1948. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 99 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1943-52 





Applicants 




Year Ending 






Number of 


June 30 






Certificates Issued 




Nonhigh School 


High School 






Graduates* 


Graduatest 




1943 


70 




14 


1944 


55 




9 


1945 


72 




26 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


tl,525 


1949 


1,129 


156 


°1,288 


1950 


1,081 


81 


xl,079 


1951 


912 


52 


a939 


1952 


779 


51 


61,107 



* Includes re-tests. 

t Includes high school graduates who took tests at request of colleges, 
j Includes 443 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
° Includes 457 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
X Includes 332 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
a Includes 291 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
b Includes 580 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 



138 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 100— Vocational Rehabilitation Semces Rendered: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1952 





Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed t 


Closed: 


County 


Number 


Reha- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 




Other 




Cases 


bilitated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


Couns^ed 


Services 


J otai otate 


4,352 


1,028 


73 


298 


764 


1,575 


624 


Baltimore City 


2,129 


480 


43 


153 


359 


788 


306 


Total Counties 


2,223 


548 


30 


145 


395 


787 


318 




206 


55 


• ■ 


14 


40 


62 


35 


Anne Arundel .... 


140 


OO 


3 


8 


26 


46 


25 


uaitimore 


329 


79 


5 


39 


54 


104 


48 






4 




• • 


1 


5 


3 


Caroline 


38 


14 


• • 


2 


9 


12 


1 


(^arroll 


96 


31 


2 


1 


22 


35 


5 


vyecii 




10 


2 


2 


14 


21 


11 


(.>naries 


31 


8 




5 


5 


10 


3 




42 


13 


■ • 


1 


5 


22 


1 




1 no 


22 


5 


9 


18 


ol 


17 


Garrett 


oo 


lo 




5 


8 


27 


10 


Harford 


96 


23 




3 


20 


32 


18 


Howard 


42 


11 




1 


13 


12 


5 


Kent 


47 


9 


i 


1 


5 


25 


6 


Montgomery 


206 


46 


1 


13 


42 


76 


28 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


240 


53 


8 


19 


44 


77 


39 


30 


6 




3 


6 


10 


5 


St. Mary's 


35 


9 




1 


5 


17 


3 


Somerset 


39 


11 






6 


21 


1 


Talbot 


24 


8 


i 


i 


1 


11 


2 


Washington 


175 


45 


1 


7 


25 


69 


28 


Wicomico 


133 


35 


1 


7 


17 


53 


20 


Worcester 


36 


10 




3 


10 


9 


4 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Character- 




Reha- 




Character- 




Reha- 




istic 


Total 


bilitated* 


Othert 


istic 


Total 


bilitated* 


Othert 


Total Number . . 


4,352 


1,028 


3,324 


Race 










White 


3,297 


813 


2,484 


Age 








Colored .... 


1,054 


215 


839 


Under 21 


1,261 


225 


1,036 


Other 


1 




1 


21-30 


919 


237 


682 








31-40 


879 


221 


658 


Sex 








41-50 


730 


194 


536 


Male 


2,913 


648 


2,265 


Over 50 


563 


151 


412 


Female .... 


1,439 


380 


1,059 


Education 








Marital Status 








None 


103 


32 


71 


Single 


2,264 


444 


1,820 


1-3 


247 


64 


183 


Married . . . 


1,431 


404 


1,027 


4-6 


855 


186 


669 


Other 


657 


180 


477 


7-9 


1,633 


371 


1,262 




10-12 


786 


175 


611 


Employment 








H.S. Graduate 


487 


135 


352 


History (At 








13-14 


120 


37 


83 


time of sur- 








15-16 


52 


17 


35 


vey) 








College 


45 


7 


38 


Employed. . 


407 


185 


222 


Unknown .... 


24 


4 


20 


Unemployed 


3,946 














Never 








Dependents 








worked . . 




140 


768 





2,759 


603 


2,156 


Worked at 








1 


597 


156 


441 


some time 




703 


2,334 


2 


345 


80 


265 


Number on 








3 


258 


80 


178 


Welfare (At 








4 


173 


49 


124 


time of 








5 


82 


24 


58 


survey) .... 


544 


106 


438 


Over 5 


138 


36 


102 











* Clients who were'rehabilitated'into employment during year (1,028). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,324). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 101 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



State of 





Total 


Number of 


Average 


Type op Service 


Expenditure 


Clients 


Cost 



Total Expenditure $277,884.24 



Examinations 
Medical. . . 
Psychiatric . 



Surgery and Treatment 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Surgical 

Dental 

Physical and occupational therapy . 



Prosthetic Appliances 

Artificial limbs 

Braces 

Hearing aids 

Glass and artificial eyes 

Surgical appliances 

Wheel chairs, hand and power operated . 

Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 

Hospitalization 

Convalescent home care 

Nursing care in [client's residence 



Training and Training Materials 
Personal adjustment training . 

Educational institutions 

Employment 

Correspondence 

Tutorial 

Training materials 



Maintenance and Transportation 
Maintenance 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration . 

Inter-current illness 

Placement 

Transportation 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration . 



Occupational Tools, Equipment, and Licenses 
Equipment for Business Enterprise Programs . . 
Miscellaneous (Other) 



11,401.02 
570.69 



4,653.64 
3,799.19 

19,274.95 
4,127.22 

11,386.82 



22,186.21 
5,899.57 
8,114.13 
1,459.00 
1,861.46 
1.781.19 



41,228.52 
645.00 



7,151.68 
44,063.36 
3,545.37 
1,608.80 
2,144.75 
5,140.33 



55,439.89 
6,845.51 



468.02 

7,633.06 
1,838.35 

2,611.92 

612.68 

391.91 



1,467 
29 



91 
27 
126 
32 
78 



127 
89 
66 

101 
66 
22 



168 

5 



88 
540 
48 
28 
20 
225 



272 
38 

47 

293 
171 

34 

8 

16 



140 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



TABLE 102 



Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1952 



School Year 


Current Expenses by Source of Funds 


Debt 
Service 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total 


State 


Federal 


Local 



TOTAL state 



1923 


$12,764,250 


$3,058,180 


$46,966 


$9,659,104 


$789,311 


$4,776,355 


1928 


16,147,689 


3,207,088 


69,150 


12,871,451 


2,131,699 


3,430,589 


1933 


18,293,874 


4,616,690 


80,139 


13,597,045 


3,142,211 


1,955,727 


1938 


20,467,797 


6,196,636 


209,722 


14,061,439 


3,739,854 


2,335,232 


1842 


23,297,176 


6,888,809 


239,686 


16,168,681 


4,055,300 


1,721,378 


1943 


23,546,628 


6,960,882 


245,787 


16,339,959 


3,776,207 


834,802 


1944 


26,772,479 


9,350,554 


155,604 


17,266,321 


4,119,423 


431,809 




28,121,601 


8,982,115 


520,720 


18,618,766 


4,063,754 


817,053 


1946 


31,068,741 


10,803,700 


434,104 


19,830,937 


4,192,979 


2,197,635 


1947 


36,621,996 


11,594,496 


1,234,736 


23,792,764 


3,878,466 


3,547,469 


1948 


51,175,927 


21,534,379 


1,547,581 


28,093,967 


4,506,683 


10,681,767 


1949 


57,567,186 


22,993,313 


1,235,487 


33,338,386 


4,893,175 


20,338,146 


1950 


64,661,563 


24,640,596 


2,011,407 


38,009,560 


6,800,278 


27,153,046 


1951 


71,448,847 


27,659,372 


2,080,125 


41,709,350 


6,133,501 


31,768,013 


1952 


80,931,643 


30,241,963 


2,380,208 


48,309,472 


7,751,625 


40,596,878 



BALTIMORE CITY 



1923 


$6,799,794 


$1,052,845 


$13,256 


$5,733,693 


$685,620 


$3,301,086 


1928 


8,360,391 


999,753 


17,240 


7,343,398 


1,580,599 


1,897,871 




9,312,282 


1,568,928 


11,131 


7,732,223 


1,983,157 


1,267,230 


1938 


10,103,224 


1,463,505 


61,200 


8,578,519 


2,335,256 


758,798 


1942 


10,817,205 


1,467,042 


55,978 


9,294,185 


2,277,294 


238,119 


1943 


10,620,120 


1,495,480 


64,355 


9,060,285 


2,105,427 


17,989 


1944 


11,925,742 


2,265,683 


45,953 


9,614,106 


2,192,721 


8,271 


1945 


12,357,985 


1,981,734 


75,627 


10,300,624 


2,210,496 


113,214 


1946 


13,048,637 


2,176,054 


77,328 


10,795,255 


2,349,885 


605,127 


1947 


14,455,866 


2,243,349 


175,615 


12,036,902 


1.958,255 


372,505 


1948 


20,500,455 


4,779,040 


656,839 


15,064,576 


2,307,374 


431,267 


1949 


22,625,966 


5,016,904 


277,450 


17,331,612 


1,628,980 


823,371 


1950 


25,684,535 


5,422,725 


717,106 


19,544,704 


1,647,487 


4,328,329 


1951 


27,113,114 


6,016,080 


668,895 


20,428,139 


1,622,453 


7,170,345 


1952 


28,683,507 


6,060,360 


506,334 


22,116,813 


1,754,563 


10,687,124 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



1923 


$5,964,456 


$2,005,335 


$33,710 


$3,925,411 


$103,691 


$1,475,269 


1928 


7,787,298 


2,207,335 


51,910 


5,528,053 


551,100 


1,532,718 


1933 


8,981,592 


3,047,762 


69,008 


5,864,822 


1,159,054 


688,497 


1938 


10,364,573 


4,733,131 


148,522 


5,482,920 


1,404,598 


1,576,434 


1942 


12,479,971 


5,421,767 


183,708 


6,874,496 


1,778,006 


1,483,259 


1943 


12,926,508 


5,465,402 


181,432 


7,279,674 


1,670,780 


816,813 


1944 


14,846,737 


7,084,871 


109,651 


7,652,215 


1,926,702 


423,538 




15,763,616 


7,000,381 


445,093 


8,318,142 


1,853,258 


703,839 


1946 


18,020,104 


8,627,646 


356,776 


9,035,682 


1,843,094 


1,592,508 


1947 


22,166,130 


9,351,147 


1,059,121 


11,755,862 


1,920,211 


3,174,964 


1948 


30,675,472 


16,755,339 


890,742 


13,029,391 


2,199,309 


10,250,500 


1949 


34,941,220 


17,976,409 


958,037 


16,006,774 


3,264,195 


19,514,775 


1950 


38,977,028 


19,217,871 


1,294,301 


18,464,856 


5,152,791 


22,824,717 


1951 


44,335,733 


21,643,292 


1,411,230 


21,281,211 


4,511,048 


24,597,668 


1952 


52,248,136 


24,181,603 


1,873,874 


26,192,659 


5,997,062 


29,909.754 



N. B. — This table has been revised to include all funds available in each year. 



142 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent of Current Expenditures: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1952 




Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 103 



Source of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 













Per 


Cent from 


Each 


Source 
















State 










Local 




Total 






Local Levy 


















Levy 


County 


Current 


State 


Federal 


and Other 


















and 




Funds 






Local Sources 


Equal- 










Fed- 


Other 












ization 


Other 


Total 


eral 


Local 












Fund 














Sour- 




























ces 




<i;so Q^l fi4.^ ^^9 


t^iO '?A^ Qfi^ 90 


S!9 ^Sn 908 0^ 


«/lS 'tOQ 4.79 9Q 


15 


2 


22 


1 


37 


3 


3 





59 


7 


Balto. City . . 


t28,683,.507,56 


t6,060,359.78 


506,334.24 


t22, 116,813.54 






21 


1 


21 




1 


8 


77 


1 








X,OlO,Of0.f J 


9fi 1 Q9 fi'^S 7^ 


23 


6 


22 


7 


46 


3 


3 


6 


50 


1 


Allegany . . . 


3,165,213.56 


1,650,666.17 


239,400.86 


1,275,146.53 


33 


8 


18 


3 


52 


1 


7 


6 


40 


3 


An. Arundel 


3,649,123.55 


1,918,064.83 


195,782.63 


1,535,276.09 


32 


5 


20 


1 


52 


6 


5 


3 


42 


1 


Baltimore . . 


8,458,966.49 


1,906,146.27 


98,594.41 


6,454,225.81 


3 


8 


18 


7 


22 


5 


1 


2 


76 


3 


Calvert .... 


547,565.20 


406,175.25 


22,700.91 


118,689.04 


53 


7 


20 


5 


74 


2 


4 




21 


7 


Caroline. . . . 


762,588.79 


49'. ,589.48 


22,334.84 


242,664.47 


46 


2 


19 


1 


65 


3 


2 


9 


31 


8 


Carroll 


1,491,238.74 


837,623.19 


41,775.89 


611,839.66 


35 


.5 


20 


7 


56 


2 


2 


8 


41 





Cecil 


1,202,839.36 


.593,589.75 


75,259.85 


533,989.76 


29 


6 


19 


7 


49 


3 


6 


3 


44 


4 


Charles .... 


1,052,769.17 


745,838.48 


75,262.73 


231,667.96 


51 


.2 


19 


7 


70 


9 


7 


1 


22 





Dorchester . 


1,012,415.25 


572,880.30 


26,830.43 


412,704.52 


37 


.5 


19 


1 


56 


6 


2 


6 


40 


8 


Frederick . . . 


1,919,623.15 


948,486.74 


82,923.81 


888,212.60 


29 


.5 


19 


9 


49 


4 


4 


3 


46 


3 


Garrett .... 


976,039.63 


72'',259.12 


28,299.61 


220,480.90 


55 


.8 


18 


7 


74 


5 


2 


9 


22 


6 


Harford. . . . 


1,942,395.48 


796,446.47 


267,867.66 


878,081.35 


22 


.3 


18 


7 


41 





13 


8 


45 


2 


Howard. . . . 


906,306.25 


569,519.17 


19,423.33 


317,363.75 


42 


9 


19 


9 


62 


8 


2 


.2 


35 





Kent 


594,748.32 


367,462.83 


14,166.43 


213,119.06 


43 


.3 


18 


5 


61 


8 


2 


4 


35 


8 


Montgomery 


7,688.781.32 


1,773,335.51 


210,849.82 


5,704,595.99 


8 


.0 


15 


1 


23 


1 


2 


7 


74 


2 


Pr. George's 


6,556,455.13 


2,993,461.94 


224,414.91 


3,338,578.28 


26 




19 


6 


45 


7 


3 


.4 


50 


9 


Qu. Anne's . 


625,986.03 


398,697.35 


17,969.22 


209,319.46 


44 


.1 


19 


1 


63 


7 


2 


9 


33 


4 


St. Mary's . . 


624,727.40 


409,878.84 


60,712.66 


154,135.90 


45 


.5 


20 


1 


65 


6 


9 


7 


24 


7 


Somerset . . . 


699,684.94 


520,328.44 


14,305.32 


165,051.18 


52 


.8 


21 


6 


74 


4 


2 





23 


6 


Talbot 


678,286.40 


400,182.58 


15,029.67 


263,074.15 


38 


.1 


20 


9 


59 





2 


.2 


38 


8 


Washington . 


3,075,189.92 


1,482,199.66 


71,870.35 


1,521,119.91 


30 


.3 


17 


9 


48 


2 


2 


.3 


49 


5 


Wicomico . . 


1,201,296.50 


609,459.21 


33,808.80 


558,028.49 


30 


.1 


20 


6 


50 


7 


2 


.8 


46 


5 


Worcester . . 


829,850.38 


470,266.84 


14,289.65 


345,293.89 


36 


.7 


20 





56 


7 


1 


7 


41 


6 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1951 and excludes those for the cur" 
rent year received after June 30, 1952. Also excludes expenditures made by county, city, and State health depart- 
ments for services rendered pubhc school pupils. 

t Includes funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System as follows: State $1,727,928, local $73,297, 
total $1,801,225. 

X Includes $2,554,194 for the Teachers' Retirement System and $31,851 for rjated expenses fund not distributed 
to the counties in these columns. 



144 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses: Counties of Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1952 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




Maryland State Department of Education 145 
TABLE 104 



Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education: 

Year Ending June 30, 1952 











Current 


Expenses 








County 


General 
Control 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Teachers 


Books, Ma- 
terials and 

Other Costs 
of Instruc- 
tion 


Opera- 
tion 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agen- 
cies* 


Fixed 
Charges and 
Payments to 
Adjoining 
Counties 


Capital 

OUTLAYf 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 





3 


Q 




7 


63 


g 


4 


5 


1 


5 


4 


4 


9 


Q 


tfi 


]^ 


33 


40 


Baltimore City 


3 


7 


1 


7 


66 


9 


3 


.5 


8 


.6 


4 


.7 


4 


.4 




.5 


27 


.14 




2 


g 




g 


62 






Q 


g 






3 




g 




9 


36 


39 


All 








g 


64 


Q 




g 


<j 


2 


3 




14 


g 




2 


30 


23 


Anne Arundel .... 


2 


9 


1 


3 


67 


1 


4 


^9 


7 


^7 


4 


!o 


10 


.1 


1 


^4 


37 


^75 


Baltimore 


2 


5 


1 


9 


68 





6 


.6 


6 


.6 


5 


.4 


8 


4 





.6 


38 


.02 




A 


Q 


1 


Q 


oy 








O 


3 


o 






Q 

y 


Q 


. D 


47 


. oy 




o 
i. 


a 
O 


1 
1 


Q 

o 


Di 


A 
U 


A 


. 


c 





a 
D 


Q 


ID 


n 
1 


U 


o 
. o 




1 A 


Carroll 


2 


8 


1 


7 


67 


3 


3 


.9 


6 


.6 


2 


.0 


13 


9 


1 


8 


10 


.98 


Cecil 


2 


2 


1 


6 


63 


6 


4 


.5 


7 


.9 


5 


.3 


13 





1 


.9 


38 


32 


Charles 


2 


9 


1 


7 


61 


3 


5 


.6 


8 


.6 


1 


.9 


15 


7 


2 


.3 


24 


85 


Dorchester 


2 


8 


1 


6 


62 


3 


3 


.4 


6 


.4 


5 


.3 


15 


8 


2 


4 


2 


39 


Frederick 


2 


2 


1 


5 


67 


3 


4 


.1 


6 


.7 


3 


.6 


13 


7 





9 


39 


83 


Garrett 


3 





2 


2 


61 





3 


.8 


4 


.0 


4 


.5 


20 


5 


1 





56 


32 


Harford 


3 


.1 


1 


1 


63 


1 


5 


.4 


8 


.2 


4 


.7 


13 


7 





7 


29 


44 


Howard 


3 


3 


1 


8 


65 


3 


4 


.2 


5 


.9 


3 


.1 


15 


9 





5 


51 


49 


Kent 


3 


8 


2 


4 


64 


4 


2 


.8 


6 


.4 


2 


.9 


16 


7 





6 


30 


65 


Montgomery 


2 


5 


1 


9 


64 


8 


6 


.0 


8 


.4 


5 


.3 


10 


3 





8 


51 


29 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


2 


.3 


1 


5 


64 


9 


6 


.3 


9 


.1 


6 


.0 


9 








9 


37 


65 


2 


6 


2 


4 


60 


2 


3 


.9 


6 


.2 


3 


.3 


19 


3 


2 


1 


11 


92 


St. Mary's 


3 


4 


2 


7 


56 


2 


3 


.6 


8 


.7 


3 


.0 


21 


6 





8 


16 


36 


Somerset 


2 


9 


2 


3 


66 


2 


2 


.9 


4 


.9 


4 


.2 


16 








6 


34 


75 


Talbot 


2 


.8 


2 


1 


65 


4 


3 


.5 


5 


.8 


3 


.8 


15 


4 




.2 


51 


23 


Washington 


4 


1 


1 


8 


69 


2 


3 


.8 


5 


.7 


2 


.3 


12 


4 





.7 


17 


14 


Wicomico 


3 





1 


8 


62 


7 


5 


.8 


5 


.3 


3 


.8 


15 


6 


2 





15 


39 


Worcester 


2 


7 


1 


7 


63 


5 


3 


.9 


5 


.7 


4 


.3 


17 


4 





8 


16 


43 


EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 


Total State 


3 


2 


1 


7 


67 


5 


4 


.7 


8 


.0 


4 


.7 


3 


7 


:6 


5 


34 


67 


Baltimore City 


3 


7 


1 


7 


67 





3 


.5 


8 


.6 


4 


.8 


4 


2 




5 


27 


20 


Total Counties 




9 


1 


8 


67 


7 


5 


.4 


7 


5 


4 


7 


3 


5 


t6 


5 ; 


38 


44 


Allegany 


3 


3 


1 


7 


68 


6 


4 


.9 


7 


8 


3 


8 


8 


7 




2 


31 


72 


Anne Arundel .... 


3 


2 


1 


4 


73 


3 


5 


.4 


8 


5 


4 


3 


2 


4 




5 


39 


85 


Baltimore 


2 


7 


2 





73 


2 


7 


.1 


7 




5 


8 


1 


4 





7 1 


39 


76 


Calvert 


5 


.0 


2 


4 


74 


4 


2 


.4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


5 


2 





7 


53 


15 


Caroline 


3 


1 


2 


1 


70 


9 


5 


.2 


6 


6 


8 





3 


2 





9 i 


36 


54 


Carroll 


3 


2 


1 


9 


75 


2 


4 


.4 


7 


3 


2 


2 


3 


8 


2 


' 


12 


12 


Cecil 


2 


4 


1 


8 


71 


5 


5 


.1 


8 


9 


5 


9 


2 


2 


2 


2 1 


41 


13 


Charles 


3 


4 


1 


9 


71 





6 


.5 


10 





2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


6 1 


27 


68 


Dorchester 


3 


2 


1 


9 


71 


8 


3 


.9 


7 


4 


6 


1 


2 


9 


2 


8 1 


2 


75 


Frederick 


2 


5 


1 


7 


75 


9 


4 


.7 


7 


5 


4 





2 


7 


1 


j 


42 


74 


Garrett 


3 


6 


2 


7 


74 


8 


4 


.7 


4 


9 


5 


5 


2 


6 


1 


2 ' 


61 


24 


Harford 


3 


4 


1 


2 


69 


2 


5 


.9 


9 





5 


2 


5 


3 





8 


31 


40 


Howard 


3 


8 


2 


1 


75 


6 


4 


.8 


6 


8 


3 


6 


2 


7 





6 


55 


07 


Kent 


4 


5 


2 


8 


75 


1 


3 


.2 


7 


5 


3 




2 


8 





7 


34 


03 


Montgomery 


2 


7 


2 





68 




6 


3 


8 


9 


5 


^ 


5 


6 





9 


52 


54 


Prince George's . . 


2 


5 


1 


6 


69 


3 


6 


8 


9 


7 


6 


3 


2 


8 


1 


: 


39 


20 


Queen Anne's .... 


3 


1 


2 


8 


72 


2 


4 


.7 


7 


5 


3 


9 


3 


3 


2 


5 


13 


96 


St. Mary's 


4 


2 


3 


4 


68 


8 


4 


4 


10 


7 


3 


7 


3 


8 


1 


! 


19 


34 


Somerset 


3 


4 


2 


7 


77 


1 


3 


.4 


5 


7 


4 


9 


2 


1 





7 1 


38 


30 


Talbot 


3 


2 


2 


4 


75 


2 


4 


.1 


6 


7 


4 


4 


2 


6 


1 


4 1 


54 


75 


Washington 


4 


4 


2 





74 


7 


4 


.1 


6 


2 


2 


4 


5 


4 





8 


18 


27 


Wicomico 


3 


5 


2 


1 


71 


6 


6 


6 


6 


1 


4 


3 


3 


5 


2 


3 1 


17 


21 


Worcester 


3 


2 


2 


1 


75 


4 


4 


7 


6 


7 


5 





1 


9 


1 





18 


93 



* Excludes expenditures for health services rendered public school pupils by county, city and State health de- 
partments. 

t Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

t Appropriations of State and local funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement funds for county 
teachers are not distributed to the counties in this column. 



146 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 105 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: General Control: State of Maryland; 

1945, 1950, 1951, 1952 



County 



1945 1950 1951 1952 



County 



1945 1950 1951 1952 



State Average . . 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 



$2.67 

3.32 

2.27 

1.92 
2.53 
1.41 



2.35 
2.46 
2.45 
2.84 
1.94 



$5.93 

7.89 

4.94 

5.37 
4.32 
3.90 
7 .48 
5.46 

5.16 
4.10 

4.05 
5.04 
3.47 



$6.24 

8.38 

5.21 

5.86 
5.30 
4.43 
7.97 
5.50 

4.87 
4.30 
4.62 
6.49 
3.55 



$6.60 

8.59 

5.61 

6.49 
5.33 
4.87 
7.71 
5.62 

5.37 
4.20 
6.00 
5.88 
4.02 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$3.68 
2.02 
2.87 
4.07 
2.80 

1.41 
4.38 
4.53 
3.03 
3.64 

1.85 
3.10 
2.31 



$5.26 
4.86 
5.70 
8.44 
5.39 

4.65 
5.71 
6.47 
5.29 
4.67 

6.44 
4.87 
5.23 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 



TABLE 106 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses*: Counties of Maryland: 

1923—1952 







All Schools 




Elementary Schools 




High Schools 


Year 




























Totalt 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923 . . . 


$43 


00 


$46 .22 


$17 


.07 


$34.84 


$39.84 


$17.08 


$90 


79 


$91.12 


$77.38 


1928. . . 


52 


62 


65.85 


24 


25 


42.91 


47.81 


22.97 


93 


61 


95.82 


52.13 


1933 . . . 


51 


89 


54.37 


25 


.95 


42.51 


46.82 


24.12 


79 


32 


82.35 


44.34 


1938. . . 


61 


12 


63.20 


35 


.15 


50.70 


53.41 


30.10 


87 


59 


90.87 


58.64 


1942 . . . 


70 


36 


70.86 


52 


.11 


58.73 


58.75 


43.40 


96 


69 


97.86 


78.57 


1943. . . 


71 


16 


72.48 


56 


54 


60.39 


60.70 


48.34 


100 


46 


102.57 


84.23 


1944°. . 


81 


77 


82.62 


66 


04 


69.04 


71.16 


58.43 


116 


06 


118.20 


100.46 


1945°. . 


86 


64 


86.62 


68 


30 


72.37 


74.83 


60.23 


120 


87 


123.04 


105.18 


19461. • 


98 


28 


98.27 


76 


97 


80.29 


83.15 


67.46 


124 


73 


127.02 


107 .44 


1947 . . . 


114 


54 


114.15 


91 


43 


92.83 


95.84 


76.69 


146 


20 


147.66 


134.92 


1948. . . 


157 


30 


153.19 


122 


59 


124.19 


128.27 


105.62 


194 


71 


198.28 


169 .78 


1949 . . . 


172 


47 


163 .29 


133 


69 


133 .08 


136.89 


116.20 


207 


84 


211.69 


182.48 


1950.. . 


176 


92 


166.09 


140 


53 


137.60 


140.91 


121.18 


208 


07 


211.11 


187.57 


1951. . . 


186 


34 


170.05 


156 


26 


141.80 


143.51 


132.52 


214 


60 


215.81 


206.56 


1952. . . 


206 


80 


193.06 


178 


44 


162.26 


164.27 


150.97 


240 


20 


241.32 


232 .73 



* Estimated expenditures made by county, city, and State health departments for health services are 
excluded. See TABLE XVI. 

t General Control, Fixed Charges and kindergartens are included in the total for all schools but are 
excluded elsewhere in this table. 

t Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 

° Includes State and county bonus. 

For basic data for 1952, see TABLES VI, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI. 



Maryland State Department of Education 147 



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148 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 108 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1952 









Instructional Service 


















Total 


























County 


Current 






Salaries of 










Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


^^apitai 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


uutlay 








visiont 


and 




























Teachers 


















Total State 


$170 


.13 


$3 


.19 


$121.67 


$8.07 


$15.25 


$10.15 


$11 


.80 


$90.72 


Baltimore City 


186 


.76 


3 


.91 


140 


.18 


7 


.30 


20 


.58 


13.36 


1 


.43 


59.56 




164 


.27 


2 


.94 


115 


.15 


8 


.35 


13 


.37 


9 .01 


15 


.45 


101 .69 


Allegany 


165 


.85 


3 


.20 


118 


.93 


7 


.31 


14 


.05 


6.25 


16 


.11 


24.53 


Anne Arundel .... 


144 


.15 


1 


.68 


103 


.62 


6 


.49 


12 


.61 


6.34 


13 


.41 


93.66 


Baltimore 


161 


.22 


2 


.61 


115 


14 


10 


.29 


11 


.69 


11.06 


10 


.43 


104.00 




183 


.62 


6 


.27 


115 


.81 


2 


.74 


13 


.56 


/ .OO 


37 


.89 


OU .DO 




171 


.18 


3 


.65 


107 


18 


7 


.93 


10 


.41 


15.12 


26 


.89 


81.02 


Carroll 


146 


.21 


2 


.65 


105 


01 


5 


09 


10 


.10 


3.09 


20 


27 


7.68 


Cecil 


145 


.16 


2 


.75 


97 


12 


5 


70 


11 


.35 


8.27 


19 


97 


146.89 


Charles 


173 


24 


2 


.91 


106 


63 


11 


61 


18 


.46 


5.60 


28 


03 


25.72 




181 


01 


2 


.78 


123 


94 


5 


38 


13 


.79 


9.17 


25 


95 


.10 


Frederick 


147 


.54 


2 


.46 


102 


00 


5 


10 


12 


.17 


5.72 


20 


09 


118.72 


Garrett 


172 


42 


3 


37 


113 


19 


5 


37 


8 


12 


6.01 


36 


36 




Harford 


159 


79 


1 


.81 


109 


37 


7 


32 


13 


46 


9.70 


18 


13 


22.47 


Howard 


162 


07 


2 


45 


109 


27 


6 


27 


12 


32 


6.44 


25 


32 


108.94 


Kent 


187 


79 


5 


.50 


126 


44 


5 


17 


14 


27 


6.63 


29 


78 


18.54 


Montgomery 


194 


44 


4 


50 


137 


50 


12 


47 


17 


70 


12.04 


10 


23 


253.82 


Prince George's . . . 


152 


22 


2 


33 


107 


19 


8 


58 


14 


84 


12.03 


7 


25 


123.65 


Queen Anne's 


184 


72 


4 


89 


118 


07 


6 


81 


11 


91 


8.95 


34 


09 


2.63 


St. Mary's 


178 


54 


3 


98 


107 


24 


7 


81 


22 


23 


3.95 


33 


33 


85.45 


Somerset 


172 


96 


4 


05 


119 


10 


5 


31 


9 


62 


7.13 


27 


75 


6.00 


Talbot 


164 


52 


4 


05 


112 


57 


4 


67 


12 


53 


9.38 


21 


32 


1.26 


Washington 


171 


17 


2 


74 


130 


25 


5 


93 


11 


25 


4.67 


16 


33 


78.96 


Wicomico 


156 


45 


3 


19 


103 


04 


10 


16 


11 


39 


6.45 


22 


22 


.98 


Worcester 


179 


25 


3 


39 


116 


92 


6 


20 


13 


02 


7.73 


31 


99 


5.35 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, kindergartens, federal funds for school lunches, and expenditures made 
by county, city, and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XVIII for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 109 

Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior 

High and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 
li 



County 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instr 

Super- 
visiont 


UCTIONAL Si 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


ERVICE 
Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$253 


.58 




$4 


.51 


$184 


.07 


$13 


.62 


$20 


.95 


$11 .62 


$18.81 


$168.50 


Baltimore City 


288 


.28 




4 


.74 


224 


.06 


11 


.15 


27 


.60 


14 .05 


6 .68 


157.11 


Total Counties 


241 


.32 




4 


.42 


169 


95 


14 


49 


18 


.61 


10.76 


23 .09 


172.52 


Allegany 


213 


.82 




3 


.57 


154 


08 


11 


91 


16 


.89 


9.14 


18.23 


175.26 


Anne Arundel .... 


225 


.18 




4 


.45 


160 


52 


12 


39 


17 


.16 


10.90 


19.76 


172 .39 


Baltimore 


229 


.88 




4 


.85 


163 


99 


15 


53 


14 


.55 


9.92 


21.04 


177.51 


Calvert 


256 


.33 








151 


86 


6 


30 


14 


.66 


7.69 


75.82 


78.32 


Caroline 


262 


67 




4 


.58 


176 


25 


13 


07 


16 


.18 


21.67 


30.92 


137.10 


Carroll 


221 


61 




4 


.17 


164 


31 


10 


61 


16 


19 


5.05 


21.28 


49.16 


Cecil 


241 


81 




3 


.53 


168 


48 


13 


41 


21 


49 


11.97 


22.93 


80.96 


Charles 


255 


61 




4 


.95 


175 


57 


14 


40 


23 


14 


3.85 


33.70 


31.96 


Dorchester 


247 


54 




3 


.41 


163 


95 


11 


20 


20 


08 


19.04 


29.86 


11.48 


Frederick 


220 


09 




3 


.13 


161 


23 


10 


35 


13 


50 


8.60 


23.28 


128.14 


Garrett 


250 


19 




6 


.75 


160 


09 


12 


56 


9 


27 


15.76 


45.76 


763 .99 


Harford 


232 


61 




3 


.01 


158 


13 


16 


58 


22 


78 


9.20 


22.91 


225.49 


Howard 


245 


.29 




4 


.29 


179 


45 


12 


66 


13 


24 


5.96 


29.69 


541.30 


Kent 


286 


51 




5 


.34 


205 


38 


9 


12 


20 


83 


10.18 


35.66 


213.78 


Montgomery 


318 


07 




5 


.97 


222 


13 


22 


35 


31 


90 


18.13 


17.59 


325.36 


Prince George's . . . 


226 


87 




3 


.06 


155 


67 


16 


58 


21 


95 


10.22 


19.39 


95.22 


Queen Anne's 


245 


20 




5 


41 


158 


69 


11 


66 


20 


26 


7.70 


41.48 


48.63 


St. Mary's 


222 


29 




5 


.57 


128 


85 


10 


27 


18 


49 


13.99 


45.12 




Somerset 


253 


49 




6 


.67 


183 


00 


8 


49 


13 


31 


10.95 


31.07 


355.16 


Talbot 


230 


66 




6 


25 


159 


74 


13 


08 


12 


33 


10.86 


28.40 


532.87 


Washington 


237 


36 




6 


02 


178 


35 


11 


17 


13 


91 


5.58 


22.33 


2.22 


Wicomico 


223 


89 




3 


03 


156 


05 


14 


44 


11 


41 


9.76 


29.20 


49.33 


Worcester 


259 


55 




2 


65 


181 


35 


11 


25 


15 


19 


15.11 


34.00 


4.93 



1: 



* Excludes general control, fixed chargos, federal funds for school lunches, and estimated expenditures made by 
county, city, and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



150 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 110 

Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: Year 

Ending June 30, 1952 



County 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


iNSTRl 

Super- 
visiont 


JCTIONAL Si 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


2RVICE 

Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$166 


76 


$3 


.77 


$125 


.80 


$7 


.02 


$12 


.41 


$7 


.18 


$10 


.58 


$75.36 




179 


79 


3 


90 


145 


.28 


7 


37 


13 


.88 


8 


.03 


1 


.33 


/ ( . oU 


Total Counties 


150 


97 


3 


.62 


102 


.20 


6 


58 


10 


.62 


6 


.16 


21 


.79 


72.40 


Allegany 


152 


61 






127 


.67 


7 


08 


10 


.99 


2 


.96 


3 


.91 


.29 


Anne Arundel .... 


141 


15 


2 


.02 


104 


.60 


5 


51 


11 


63 


3 


58 


13 


.81 


101 .37 




176 


05 


4 


.58 


121 


.93 


11 


33 


13 


95 


11 


09 


13 


.17 


5.99 


Calvert 


118 


06 


4 


83 


84 


.93 


1 


50 


5 


25 


2 


.78 


18 


.77 


137 .20 


Caroline 


140 


89 


4 


.04 


88 


.92 


4 


97 


8 


14 


4 


38 


30 


.44 


54.09 


Carroll 


133 


03 


3 


69 


78 


.52 


4 


33 


10 


79 


2 


71 


32 


.99 


19.41 


Cecil 


160 


41 


3 


.23 


97 


.97 


5 


17 


16 


26 


6 


44 


31 


.34 


185.00 


Charles 


142 


96 


2 


87 


98 


01 


8 


30 


10 


48 


1 


92 


21 


.38 


117.47 


Dorchester 


138 


43 


4 


68 


90 


57 


4 


39 


5 


78 


3 


51 


29 


50 






123 


15 


2 


45 


82 


31 


6 


14 


8 


25 


2 


17 


21 


83 


8i'.87 


Garrett 
































Harford 


148 


32 


i 


81 


9i 


06 


9 


46 


15 


28 


8 


65 


22 


06 


15 '.ii 


Howard 


157 


45 


4 


69 


107 


56 


5 


01 


7 


19 


7 


22 


25 


.78 


27.80 


Kent 


160 


43 


5 


07 


107 


45 


4 


24 


8 


92 


2 


88 


31 


87 


87.19 


Montgomery 


206 


01 


3 


79 


137 


40 


9 


22 


16 


45 


11 


57 


27 


.58 


281.82 


Prince George's . . . 


158 


87 


2 


92 


104 


23 


8 


19 


13 


66 


11 


09 


18 


78 


114.10 




166 


81 


5 


86 


109 


65 


6 


18 


5 


85 


3 


37 


35 


90 


.03 


St. Mary's 


148 


44 


7 


18 


89 


91 


1 


74 


9 


23 


2 


44 


37 


94 


7.50 


Somerset 


123 


55 


2 


84 


83 


73 


3 


24 


6 


32 


5 


42 


22 


00 




Talbot 


138 


25 


2 


92 


94 


55 


2 


87 


9 


80 




45 


27 


66 


' .74 




161 


31 






117 


11 


4 


00 


15 


44 


1 


40 


23 


36 




Wicomico 


141 


84 


4 


39 


97 


77 


6 


89 


5 


35 


5 


13 


22 


31 


' .96 


Worcester 


124 


17 


5 


08 


79 


48 


4 


98 


5 


65 


4 


71 


24 


27 


2.25 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, kindergartens, federal funds for school lunches, and expenditures made by 
county, city, and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 111 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior 
High and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1952 









Instructional Service 




















Total 




























County 


Current 






Salaries of 










Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








visiont 


and 






























Teachers 




















Total State 


$226 


33 


$4 


65 


$165 


.24 


$10 


42 


$18 


14 


$8 


.20 


$19 


.68 


$130.55 


Baltimore City 


219 


97 


4 


82 


174 


28 


8 


47 


19 


77 


7 


.99 


4 


.64 


114.94 


Total Counties 


232 


.73 


4 


49 


156 


12 


12 


.39 


16 


49 


8 


.41 


34 


.83 


146.29 


Allegany 


309 


.21 






235 


81 


16 


.13 


22 


89 


8 


.79 


25 


.59 


.29 


Anne Arundel .... 


213 


63 






146 


02 


11 


96 


17 


.74 


6 


.90 


31 


01 


18.12 


Baltimore 


240 


24 


10 


46 


165 


37 


20 


42 


16 


66 


8 


65 


18 


.68 


18 .15 


Calvert 


198 


81 






137 


02 


5 


88 


9 


43 


2 


86 


43 


.62 


614.24 


Caroline 


219 


00 


2 


88 


146 


.54 


10 


29 


12 


06 


5 


.02 


42 


21 


199.89 


Carroll 


257 


36 


4 


06 


197 


11 


8 


68 


14 


67 


1 


79 


31 


05 


.75 


Cecil 


278 


63 


5 


12 


160 


52 


12 


60 


20 


65 


34 


03 


45 


71 


10.72 


Charles 


218 


56 


3 


34 


146 


05 


11 


71 


21 


16 


3 


00 


33 


30 


117.02 


Dorchester 


223 


53 


2 


51 


160 


69 


5 


67 


9 


76 


13 


89 


31 


01 


14.32 




195 


42 


7 


37 


143 


49 


11 


84 


6 


49 


4 


10 


22 


13 


181.98 


Garrett 
































Harford 


283 


71 


3 


oi 


216 


20 


14 


71 


15 


99 


11 


42 


22 


38 


24. ii 


Howard 


240 


25 


7 


28 


156 


46 


11 


75 


13 


47 


5 


85 


45 


44 


13.58 


Kent 


260 


69 


7 


85 


174 


24 


7 


90 


13 


49 


5 


76 


51 


45 


178 .26 


Montgomery 


351 


97 


6 


27 


219 


03 


20 


43 


35 


41 


19 


09 


51 


74 


364.97 


Prince George's . . . 


221 


26 


6 


13 


130 


36 


14 


25 


21 


13 


10 


03 


39 


36 


128.73 


Queen Anne's 


232 


80 


5 


08 


157 


13 


8 


27 


15 


73 


5 


21 


41 


38 


133.13 


St. Mary's 


240 


45 


8 


30 


157 


59 


8 


36 


15 


00 


5 


06 


46 


14 


16.96 


Somerset 


167 


22 


3 


97 


117 


67 


4 


30 


6 


54 


9 


16 


25 


58 


115.03 


Talbot 


209 


37 






157 


39 


7 


42 


5 


65 


1 


13 


37 


78 


566.45 


Washington 


322 


22 






243 


26 


9 


03 


31 


86 


3 


77 


34 


30 


6.33 


Wicomico 


216 


77 


2 


94 


155 


62 


10 


26 


7 


45 


8 


88 


31 


62 


318.15 




195 


08 


2 


17 


131 


31 


9 


77 


8 


64 


* 


55 


38 


64 


265.41 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, federal funds for school lunches and expenditures made by county, city 
and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



i 


Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 
2 - " ~- - 


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County 


Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

v>ecu 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's . . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



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154 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 114 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland: 1951-52 



TVPE OF 

Vocational Program 


1952 
Allottment 


1952 
Expenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1952 


Total 


$308,915.13 

89,399.00 
124,609.05 
66,005.11 
13,901.97 
15,000.00 


$299,862.88 

89,399.00 
115,980.17 
66,005.11 
13,901.97 
14,576.63 


$9,052.25 


Agriculture 


Trades and Industry 

Home Economics 


8,628.88 


Teacher Training and Supervision 




Distributive Education 


423.37 



TABLE 115 



Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 1951-52 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


All 

Subjects 


Agri- 
culture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total Expended in Maryland .... 


$299,862.88 


$92,183.22 


$122,656.81 


$70,446.22 


$14,576.63 


Instruction in Counties: 

Day Schools— White 


108,435.74 
20,397.49 
50,207.62 
6,681.00 


61,707.00 
14,293.05 
2,615.50 
715.00 


28,315.35 
860.00 


14,023.82 
5,244.44 

29,834.00 
5,083.50 


4,389.57 




Adult Education— White 


17,758.12 
882.50 




Colored .... 




Instruction in Baltimore City: 
Day Schools— White 


32,737.98 
14,178.02 
3,441.52 
656.66 




32,737.98 
14,178.02 
2,983.37 
656.66 






Colored 








Adult Education— White 






458.15 


Colored .... 






Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 


6,332.23 






6,332.23 
1,390.80 


1,390.80 

2,213.00 
5,600.00 
19,057.06 








Instruction by the University of 
Maryland: 
Mining 




2,213.00 
5,600.00 
9,166.84 












Teacher Training and Guidance 


5,449.11 


4,441.11 




State Supervision 


28,533.76 


7,403.56 


7,304.97 


11,819.35 


2,005.88 





Maryland State Department of Education 15 



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157 



TABLE 118 

Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland Counties: 1951-52 



County 



Expenditures for Salaries 



Total 



Federal 
Funds 



State 
Funds 



Other 
PVnds 



Per Cent of 
Salaries 



Fed- 
eral 
Funds 



State 
Funds 



Other 
Funds 



Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Salaries 



Receipts 
from 
Fees 



Grand Total. 



$133,252.08| $56,888.62 



$53,975.00 



$22,388.4( 



42.7 



40 



16.8 



$10,156.65 



$35,373.34 



WHITE 



Total Counties 


$121,730.05! 


$50,207.62 


$49,649.80 


$21,872.63 


41 


2 


40 


.8 


18 


.0 


$9,435.69 


$33,895.59 




23,112.00 


12,238.62 


5,795.06 


5,078.32 


52 


9 


25 


.1 


22 


.0 


903.30 


2,873.16 


Anne Arundel 


2,293.50, 


747.50 


1,510.00! 


36.00 


32 


6 


65 


.8 


1 


.6 


220.00 


809.00 




18,715.32 


10,883.00 


6,675.311 


1,157.01 


58 




35 


7 


6 


.2 


3,270.29 


5,725.00 


Calvert 


512.50 




512.50! 








100 













Caroline 


230.50 




230.50 








100 









78.04 


56.00 


Carroll 


2,137.20 


740.50 


1,000.00 


3 9 6. "7 6 


34 




46 


8 


is 


.6 


12.00 


235.00 


Cecil 


246.00; 




246.00 








100 













Charles 


539.921 




356.00 


183.92 






65 


9 


34 

6 


'.i 






Dorchester 


1,182.11! 


66.00 


1,040.00 


76.11 


'5 




88 
96 





.4 






Frederick 


622.00 


600.00 


22.00 






5 


3 


.5 




113.00 


Garrett 


690.00 




640.50 


49.50 






92 


8 


7 


.2 




Harford 


13,606.50 


5,719.00 


7,662.01 


225.49 


42 




56 


3 


1 


.7 




982.15 


Howard 


736.00, 


570.23! 


165.77 




77 


5 


22 


.5 


26.6a 


Kent 


619.00' 





619.001 






100 







257.22 


128.00 


Montgomery 


35,408.00 


12,535.00 


11,641.12! 


11,231.88 


35 


4 


32 


9 


3i 


j 


2,058.27 


14.609.43 


Prince George's .... 


9,741.00| 


2,964.50 


5,037.171 


1,739.33 


30 


4 


51 


7 


17 


.9 


1,602,42 


3,894.75 


Queen Anne's 


280.50; 




280.50 








100 













St. Mary's 


580.001 


110.00 


470.00 




i9 


6 


81 









105.65 






253.00 


253.00' 






100 











Talbot 


944.50 




944.50 








100 









11.29 


129.00 


Washington 


7,669.50' 


3,758.00 


2,491.90 


1,419.60 


49 


6 


32 


5 


is 


.5 


817.06 


4,209.10 


Wicomico 


961.00 


132.00 


829.00 




13 


7 


86 


3 






74.15 


132.00 


Worcester 


650.00. 


313.50 


245.50| 


91.00 


48 


2 


37 


8 


i4 


.6 















COLORED 



Total Counties $11,522.03 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Qu(M»n Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



218.50 
2,834.50 
1,844.53 



266.00 
566.50 



,740.50 
165.00 
130.00 
244.OOI 
842.001 



209.00 
624.00 
702.00 
778.00 
3r>7.50 



$6,681. OOj $4,325.20' $515.83 



218.501 
1,777.001 



1,001.50 



430.00 



1,636.00! 

55.00' 
I3O.OO1 



I 

624.00 
342.00 
310.00 
91.00 



1,057.60 
831.79 



239.31 
136.50 



85.21 
77 4.06 j 

209.00 

25', .33 
468.00 
266.50 



244.00 
1.94 



102.67 



58.0 I 37.5 

100.0 i .... 
62.7 37.3 
54.3 45.1 



75.9 



94.0 
33.3 
100.0 



100.0 
48.7 
39.8 
25.5 



90.0 
24.1 



51 



91 



100.0 

36 ".7 
60.2 
74.5 



4.5 



10. 



100 




$720.96 



140.00 
232.88 



208.00 



2.26 
137.82 



158 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

t ecu 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

(larrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince (Jeorge's. . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



160 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



TABLE 123 

Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Pupil Transported: 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Average Expenditure for Transportation 



County 


All Schools 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total State 


$33 


.06 


$31 


.74 


$34 


.78 


$31 


.46 


$30 


.10 


$33 


.17 


$41 


.55 


$39 


.90 


$43 


.86 


Baltimore City . . 


111 


.43 


97 


.70 


232 


.10 


108 


.67 


88 


.62 


252 


.78 


123 


.46 


122 


.96 


155 


.14 


Total Counties . . 


32 


.66 


31 


.19 


34 


54 


31 


.07 


29 


64 


32 


.87 


41 


.06 


39 


.05 


43 


.84 


Allegany 


32 


.29 


32 


.14 


32 


45 


32 


.04 


32 


11 


31 


.97 


95 


.67 


56 


.74 


104 


94 


Anne Arundel . 


25 


.99 


24 


.86 


27 


37 


23 


.44 


23 


08 


23 


.92 


38 


.01 


35 


.03 


40 


63 


Baltimore 


27 


.34 


25 


.78 


29 


03 


26 


.63 


25 


00 


28 


.34 


37 


.08 


34 


.16 


42 


66 


Calvert 


44 


14 


35 


.18 


57 


36 


52 


.59 


40 


97 


68 


44 


33 


.54 


28 


.41 


41 


89 




44 


50 


43 


.75 


45 


48 


43 


.43 


42 


17 


45 


.16 


47 


.43 


48 


.42 


46 


.29 


Carroll 


27 


03 


27 


.14 


26 


86 


26 


02 


26 


00 


26 


.05 


46 


01 


48 


04 


42 


67 


Cecil 


32 


42 


32 


.15 


32 


80 


30 


70 


30 


68 


30 


74 
08 


51 


94 


51 


76 


52 


12 


Charles 


34 


80 


33 


23 


37 


35 


38 


65 


37 


66 


40 


30 


03 


28 


28 


33 


35 


Dorchester .... 


56 


93 


59 


00 


53 


94 


55 


60 


54 


79 


56 


66 


59 


88 


67 


09 


46 


49 


Frederick 


34 


39 


33 


69 


35 


39 


33 


43 


32 


09 


35 


29 


47 


.25 


54 


39 


36 


66 


Garrett 


54 


92 


56 


56 


52 


74 


54 


92 


56 


56 


52 


74 














Harford 


26 


40 


25 


83 


27 


31 


26 


30 


25 


52 


27 


55 


27 


06 


27 


90 


25 


82 


Howard 


32 


02 


31 


27 


33 


12 


30 


45 


30 


54 


30 


31 


38 


24 


34 


35 


43 


22 


Kent 


47 


20 


43 


70 


52 


36 


44 


85 


41 


71 


49 


79 


52 


30 


48 


39 


57 


30 


Montgomery . . 


27 


53 


23 


80 


33 


34 


25 


09 


21 


90 


30 


03 


43 


91 


36 


32 


56 


17 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


25 


73 


20 


58 


31 


02 


21 


86 


16 


64 


27 


06 


41 


70 


35 


57 


48 


94 


48 


51 


48 


98 


47 


96 


48 


29 


47 


36 


49 


42 


49 


10 


53 


59 


44 


20 


St. Mary's .... 


46 


24 


47 


29 


44 


86 


45 


96 


47 


53 


44 


21 


46 


77 


46 


91 


46 


50 


Somerset 


43 


66 


44 


78 


42 


15 


50 


67 


50 


55 


50 


85 


34 


96 


37 


05 


32 


39 


Talbot 


44 


10 


45 


11 


42 


77 


44 


89 


45 


99 


43 


59 


42 


88 


43 


90 


41 


33 


Washington . . . 


34 


69 


31 


74 


37 


97 


33 


76 


30 


80 


37 


07 


175 


43 


221 


86 


145 


07 


Wicomico 


50 


16 


51 




47 


33 


52 


17 


52 


29 


51 


93 


45 


31 


50 


33 


38 


25 


Worcester 


48 


11 


47 


44 


49 


01 


53 


09 


54 


54 


51 


20 


40 


93 


37 


44 


45 


75 



N. B.— Underlying data will be found in TABLES 121 and 122. 



162 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 124 — Number of Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public 
Expense: Number of Buses Used: State of Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1952 



County 


Number of Different Schools 


Number of Vehicles 




Schools for White Pupils 




Buses Owned by 


riva e 


Total 








vvOlored 






v^ars and 






Ele- 


Com- 


High 


Schools 






Station 






mentary 


bined 


School 




County 


Con- 








Only 


Elem. & 


Only 






tractors 










High 












Total State 


677 


342 


78 


74 


183 


327 


1,187 


**t99 


Baltimore City . . . 


7 


5 






2 




15 




Total Counties . . . 


670 


337 


78 


74 


181 


327 


1,172 


**t99 


Allegany 


34 


20 


8 


4 


2 




85 


14 


Anne ArundelJ . 


50 


26 


1 


7 


16 




97 




Baltimore 


62 


35 


6 


8 


13 


39 


124 


"2 


Calvert 


12 


4 


1 




7 


2 


30 


6 




13 


4 


5 




4 




39 




Carroll 


20 


9 


7 


'2 


2 


"4 


53 


5 


Cecil 


22 


11 


5 


3 


3 


1 


50 


5 


Charles 


25 


2 


4 


2 


17 




45 


8 


Dorchester 


32 


13 


5 


2 


12 




49 


4 


Frederick 


33 


18 


6 


2 


7 


14 


82 


*1 


Garrett 


28 


23 


4 


1 




2 


71 


tl4 


Harford 


24 


17 


1 


3 


3 


26 


49 






17 


5 


3 


1 


8 




39 




Kent 


15 


6 


2 


2 


5 




33 


■3 


Montgomery . . . 


59 


35 


4 


9 


11 


lii 


34 




Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 


60 


27 


1 


12 


20 


93 


is 


24 


12 




3 


9 




30 


St. Mary's 


19 


11 




2 


6 




36 


13 


Somerset 


19 


5 


3 


2 


9 




43 


t 


Talbot 


20 


7 


1 


2 


10 


'2 


31 


3 


Washington .... 


42 


31 


4 


6 


1 


32 


47 


*3 


Wicomico 


21 


10 


3 


1 


7 




54 


3 




19 


6 


4 




9 




51 


2 



* Each asterisk denotes one county-owned station wagon, 
t Excludes two horses in Garrett and one boat in Somerset. 

X Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



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164 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 126 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as 

of June 30, 1952 



County 


School Bonds* 

Outstanding 
June 30, 1952 


1951 Assessed 
Valuation Tax- 
anie at run xvate 
for County 
Purposes 


Assessed Valua- 
tion per Dollar of 
School Bonded 
Indebtedness 


Per Cent School 
Bonded Indebted- 
ness Is of As- 
sessed Valuation 


Tnfnl Stntp 


$136,714,302 


$4,356,914,243 


$32 


q 
o 




Baltimore City 


t22,539,495 


1,966,551,246 


87 


1 


.1 




114 174 RCil 


9 ^QO ^(^9 QQ7 


21 


4 


.8 




3,438,000 


141,228,965 


41 


2 


.4 




11,166,000 


J141,219,041 


13 


7 


.9 


Baltimore 


2; ,591,000 


t543,008,840 


20 


5 


.1 


Calvert 


1,087,000 


11,826,992 


11 


9 


2 




652,000 


23,133,680 


35 


2 


'.S 


Carroll 


1,300,000 


70,921,824 


55 


1 


.8 


Cecil 


1,420,000 


$62,324,145 


44 


2 


.3 


Charles 


1,629,000 


$21,115,464 


13 


7 


7 




1,483,180 


45,845,200 


31 


3 


2 


Frederick 


1,459,000 


103,601,595 


71 


1 


4 




1,275,000 


25,983,143 


20 


4 


9 




6,062,500 


$97,023,867 


16 


6 


2 


Howard 


1,728,200 


30,471,598 


18 


5 


7 


Kent 


1,200,000 


22,780,110 


19 


5 


3 




23,913,811 


$419,619,140 


17 


5 


7 


Prince George's 


t20,469,116 


$276,997,215 


13 


7 


4 


799,000 


26,644,212 


33 


3 





St. Mary's 


605,000 


20,297,892 


33 


3 





Somerset 


670,000 


18,606,505 


28 


3 


6 


Talbot 


1,440,000 


34,849,235 


24 


4 


1 


Washington 


338,000 


139,394,531 


412 





2 




3,079,000 


71,116,983 


23 


4 






1,370,000 


42,352,820 


31 


3 


2 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 

t Sinking Fund balances have been deducted as follows: Prince George's, $4,884; Baltimore City, 
$2,221,505. 

$ Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 



TABLE 127 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments per 

Belonging: 1951-52 



Pupil 





School 






School 






Bonded 


Interest 




Bonded 


Interest 


County 


Indebted- 
ness 


Payments 


County 


Indebted- 
ness 


Payments 



Total State .... 

Baltimore City. 

Total Counties. 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 



$371 


74 


$7 


34 


Garrett 


$276 


.69 


$5 


78 










Harford 


632 


.30 


10 


55 


184 


45 


4 


60 




386 


54 


5 


99 










Kent 


468 


.93 


8 


85 


464 


94 


8 


70 


Montgomery 


734 


.00 


12 


11 


230 


07 


6 


04 




591 


71 


11 


20 


559 


64 


17 


64 


Queen Anne's 


281 


34 


3 


79 


638 


39 


9 


31 


St. Mary's 


196 


.05 


2 


98 


381 


27 


8 


85 




179 


.72 


2 


20 


180 


91 


3 


09 


Talbot 


408 


86 


4 


26 


166 


07 


3 


07 




23 


.73 





87 


230 


48 


3 


79 


Wicomico 


472 


.82 


9 


21 


312 


61 


6 


93 


Worcester 


328 


.38 


6 


82 


307 


08 


7 


19 












139 


38 


3 


36 













* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



TABLE 128 

Value of School Property: State of Maryland: 1923-1952 





Value 


OF School PROPERTY*t 


Value per Pupil Enrolled 


Yeak 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49,633,230 


31,702,972 


277 


410 


184 


1942 


88,171,154 


49,728,358 


38,442,796 


296 


421 


213 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


39,490,295 


300 


430 


217 


1944 


89,951,808 


50,127,722 


39,824,086 


304 


427 


223 


1945 


89,660,481 


49,726,430 


39,934,051 


303 


437 


219 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


45,209,163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


47,079,154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


53,822,176 


338 


437 


278 


1949 


120,474,231 


50,258,400 


70,215,831 


373 


428 


342 


1950 


147,205,363 


50.659,159 


96,546,204 


429 


417 


435 


1951 


179,725,597 


50,659,159 


129,066,438 


490 


405 


533 


1952 


205,918,642 


50,647,823 


155,270,819 


533 


394 


603 



* Excludes admmistration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t Value of equipment has been excluded from Baltimore City but included in the counties. 



166 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 129 



Value of Maryland School Property* per Pupil Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



County 


All Schools 


Schools for White 
Pupils 


Schools for Colored 
Pupils 


Total 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 






$205,918,642 


$559 


.91 


$181,005,923 


$624 


.11 


$24,912,719 


$320.44 


Baltimore City .... 


fSO, 647,823 


414 


.47 


t42, 644,572 


538 


.31 


tS, 003 ,251 


186 .22 


1 oiai i^ouncies .... 


155,270,819 


632 


.29 


138,361,351 


656 


.36 


16,909,468 


486 .36 


Allegany 


10,298,782 


689 


.18 


10,155,749 


691 


.75 


143,033 


545.51 


Anne Arundel . . . 


11,580,890 


580 


.44 


9,237,700 


591 


55 


2,343,190 


540.42 


Baltimore 


25,852,480 


598 


.16 


23,506,642 


596 


35 


2,345,838 


616.86 


Calvert 


976,447 


342 


.48 


710,900 


497 


72 


265,547 


186.64 




2,369,936 


657 


.59 


2,004,644 


736 


92 


365,292 


413.37 


Carroll 


5,916,550 


755 


.81 


5.622,150 


759 


26 


294,400 


695.49 


Cecil 


4,470,200 


725 


61 


4,228,850 


743 


19 


241,350 


512.96 


Charles 


2,959,495 


567 


.99 


1,774,500 


601 


53 


1,184,995 


524.22 


Dorchester 


2,570,150 


532 


14 


2,478,937 


743 


78 


91,213 


60.93 


Frederick 


6,759,280 


645 


68 


6,490,230 


683 


10 


269,050 


278.17 




690,021 


149 


73 
39 


690,021 


149 


73 






Harford 


6,322,000 


659 


5,634,050 


665 


55 


687,950 


612 ".87 


Howard 


1,890,300 


422 


81 


1,478,500 


416 


55 


411,800 


446.93 


Kent 


1,427,110 


557 


70 


1,126,195 


632 


94 


300,915 


385.99 


Montgomery .... 


27,059,932 


830 


56 


25,120,250 


831 


90 


1,939,682 


813.59 


Prince George's. . 


22,655,159 


654 


91 


19,269,755 


656 


20 


3,385,404 


647.68 


Queen Anne's . . . 


2,200,100 


774 


66 


1,731,500 


840 


62 


468,600 


600.54 


St. Mary's 


1,053,000 


341 


25 


661,250 


320 


96 


391,750 


382.01 




1,226,610 


329 


04 


1,105,810 


501 


27 


120,800 


79.37 


Talbot 


1,683,140 


477 


85 


1,245,914 


523 


85 


437,226 


382.22 


Washington 


8,389,900 


589 


04 


7,891,900 


565 


83 


498,000 


1,683.00 


Wicomico 


5,829,887 


895 


24 


5,384,204 


1,115 


30 


445,683 


264.58 


Worcester 


1,089,450 


261 


15 


811,700 


310 


22 


277,750 


178.59 



* Excludes administration buildings, teacherages, janitors' homes, warehouses, storage buildings 
repair shops, and buildings under construction or no longer in use. 
t Value of equipment has been excluded. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 130 

Revenue and Appropriations: Maryland Counties and Baltimore City: 1951-52 



County 



Total Revenue 
of the Counties' 
and Bnltimore 
City* 



Appropriations for Public Schools" 



Total for 
SchooU 



Current 
Expenses 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



Appropriation 
for 
Operating 
Expenses of 
Libraries! 



Total State 

Baltimore Cityf. . 
Total Counties. . . 

i 

Allegany | 

Anne Arundelt . 
Baltimoret .... 

Calvert | 

Caroline I 



CarroUt 

Cecil 

Charles .... 
Dorchester! 
Frederickt . 



Garrettt 

Harfordt. . . . 
Howardf. . . . 

Kentt 

Montgomery 



Prince George's 
Queen Anne'sf 
St. Mary's . . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washingtonf . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$122,206,892.39 

63,973,491.37 

58,233,401.02 

3,065,930.13 
4,347,689.97 
14,182,028.50 
309,768.99 
523,259.67 

1,598,419.97 
1,118,356.81 
553,530.09 
738,656.55 
:i,881,635.64 

1,088,708.59 
^2,103,355.31 
960,601.54 
490,972.97 
10,673,536.82 

7,968,781.16 
504,602.03 
634,001.43 
390,409.57 
720,984.41 

2,528,346.05 
1,174,953.53 
674,871.29 



$56,612,666.05 

23,909,035.87 

32,'( 03,630.18 

1,688,034.25 
1,999,399.57 
7,537,955.03 
190,237.80 
314,824.54 

912,300.43 
696,416.72 \ 
314.688.28 ! 
370,416.39 I 
1,444,702.70 

373,591.78 
854,374.37 
395,951.77 
327,220.58 
6,509,956.91 

4,368,084.31 
237,835.12 
182,606.35 
245,229.69 
378,501.23 

2,022,922.95 
819,600.21 
518,779.20 



$47,648,705.13 $6,616,835.67 $2,347,125.25 
21,868,620.59 \ 1,696,845.00 ' 343,570.28 



25,780,084.54 i 4,919,990.67 



1,307,066.75 
1,428,299.57 
6,417,984.29 
127,263.06 I 
213,582.76 ; 

658,489.43 ^ 
588,538.00 I 
212,489.53 
334,108.26 
922,372.66 

215,345.82 i 
782,264.13 ; 
326,554.00 
254,584.33 
5,514,574.00 ' 

3,305,406.61 I 
200,889.84 : 
163,884.52 
217,505.63 
257,741.83 

1,392,785.41 
608,795.00 ' 
329,559.11 I 



356,267.50 
571,100.00 
1,014,220.42 



62.974.74 I 
21,241.78 I 

53,026.00 

50,1.57.07 I 

82.698.75 ] 
36,308.13 ' 

118,335.60 i 



101,625.00 I 
72,110.24 
40,545.77 
72,636.25 \ 

995,382.91 I 

787,835.51 i 
22,767.50 
9,206.25 
8,686.25 
80,000.00 

89,420.00 
159,976.25 
113,468.75 ; 



2,003,554.97 
24,' 00.00 
105,'750'.32 j 
86,000.66 

I 

200,785.00 ' 
57,721.65 
19,500.00 



403,994.44 
56,620.96 
28,852.66 



274,842.19 
14,177.78 
9,515.58 
19,037.81 
40,759.40 

540,717.54 
50,828.96 
75,751.34 



$2,183,865.90 
1,692,546.47 
491,319.43 



30,580.06 
120,245.87 



16,000.00 
7,000.00 
yl,750.00 
y7, 500.00 

5,206.67 
20,553.61 
6,367.18 



zl53,872.34 

57,798.88 
7,446.01 
7.612.46 
y900.00 
6.400.00 

28.500.00 
13,586.35 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau, include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is average of 1951 and 1952 revenue. 

X 1952 revenue information not available. 1952 budget figure averaged with 1951 revenue. 

° Figures from annual financial reports of County Departments of Education. 

X Figures from certificates received from librarians, except as noted. 

y From published levy. 

z From State Fiscal Research Bureau. 



168 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



CHART 5 



Per Cent of Total Revenues Appropriated for Public Schools: Counties and 
Incorporated Places in Maryland: 1951-1952 (1951*) 



Co\inty 

Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Montgomery 
Kent 

Balti;nore 

Cecil 

Somerset 

Washington 

Calvert 

Charles 

Prince George 

Queen Anne's 

Carroll 

Hovard 

Frederick 

Caroline 

Wicomico 

Harford 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Talbot 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 



Total 

37.^ 

57.3 
58.9 
53.2 
52.6 

60,1 
56.0 
53.3 
ii7.2 

a. 8 

A7.7 
A1.2 
52.3 
^7.3 
ii2.9 
3ii.5 
i;9.5 
3^.8 
37.2 
-^0.2 
^0.9 
27.9 
31.2 



Current 
Expenses 



|— . Debt Service and 
I I Capital Outlay 




49.0 




46.8 


^^■■13.1 








44.4 






43.8 


■■□□5.6 




■■ 18.7 


1 




* Calendar year 1951. 



Maryland State Department of Education 169 



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170 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 132 

Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates: 

1951-52 



County 


Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 


Published 
Tax Rates" 


Additional 
Rates° in 
Districts 
and 
Incorporated 
Placesb 


Total 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt Service 
and 
Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$1 


24 


$1 .04 


$0 


20 














Baltimore Cityt 


1 


18 


1.08 





10 


$2 


.62 










Total Counties 


1 


28 


1.01 





27 














Allegany 


1 


18 


0.91 





27 


1 


.82 


$ 


20-$l 


31 




1 


25 


to. 89 





36 


al 


.71 




1.00 




Baltimoret 


1 


26 


tl.01 





19 


1 


.60 










Calvert 


1 


44 


0.96 





48 


1 


.82 





.75- 


i 


40 


Caroline 


1 


28 


0.87 





41 


1 


.80 





.25- 


1 


15 


CarroUt 


1 


16 


0.84 





32 


1 


.25 





.50- 





70 


Cecil 


1 


03 


to. 87 





16 


1 


.36 





.20- 


1 


35 


Charles 


1 


31 


to. 88 





43 


1 


.30 





.50- 





80 


Dorchester}" 





77 


0.70 





07 


1 


.35 





50- 


1 


10 


Frederickt 


1 


37 


to. 87 





50 


1 


.34 





20- 


1 


40 


Garrettt 


1 


35 


0.78 





57 


1 


95 





.30- 





90 


Harf ordt 





78 


to. 71 





07 


1 


32 





.83- 


1 


10 




1 


18 


0.97 





21 


al 


70 










Kentt 


1 


35 


1.05 





30 


1 


50 





35- 


6 


90 


Montgomery 


1 


52 


tl.29 





23 


a2 


03 





10- 


1 


07 


Prince George's .... 


1 


46 


tl.ll 





35 


a2 


00 





.20- 


1 


20 


Queen Anne'sf 





84 


0.71 





13 


1 


34 





20- 





90 


St. Mary's 





85 


to. 76 





09 


1 


20 




0.90 




Somerset 


1 


21 


1.07 





14 


1 


50 





60- 


1 


50 


Talbot 


1 


04 


0.71 





33 


1 


60 





85- 


1 


25 


Wicomico 


1 


38 


0.95 





43 


1 


50 





35- 





60 


1 


16 


0.86 





30 


1 


38 





30- 





88 


Worcester 


1 


17 


0.74 





43 


1 


35 





65- 


1 


40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valua- 
tions. 

t Calendar year fiscal period. 

t Excludes funds from federal government for schools at Indian Head and Patuxent River and funds 
authorized by Public Law 874. 

° Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax is excluded. 

a Excludes rates for special service levies, 

b Figures from report of State Fiscal Research Bureau. 



Maryland State Department of Education 171 



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172 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



I 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



173 



TABLE 135 



Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1951-52 



County 


Total Basis Assessable at 
Full Rate for County 
Purposes 


Number of 
Pupils Belonging 


Wealth per Pupil 


Total State 


$4,391,575,062 


367,768 


$11,941 




*1,980,769,676 


122,198 


16,209 


Total Counties 


2,410,805,386 


245,570 


9,817 


Allegany 


141,228,965 


14,943 


9,451 




*141,408,508 


19,952 


7,087 




♦549,258,840 


43,220 


12,708 


Calvert 


11,826,992 


2,851 


4,148 




23,133,680 


3,604 


6,419 


Carroll 


*70,921,824 


7,828 


9,060 


Cecil 


62,898,645 


6,161 


10,209 




21,174,770 


5,211 


4,063 


Dorchester 


*45,845,200 


4,830 


9,492 


Frederick 


♦103,601,595 


10,468 


9,897 


Garrett 


*25,983,143 


4,608 


5,639 


Harford 


♦100,821,659 


9,588 


10,515 




♦30,471,598 


4,471 


6,815 


Kent 


♦22,780,110 


2,559 


8,902 


Montgomery 


420,760,423 


32,580 


12,915 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


285,427,256 


34,593 


8,251 


♦26,644,212 


2,840 


9,382 


St. Mary's 


20,297,892 


3,086 


6,577 


Somerset 


18,606,505 


3,728 


4,991 


Talbot 


34,849,235 


3,522 


9,895 


Washington 


♦139,394,531 


14,243 


9,787 


Wicomico 


71,116,983 


6,512 


10,921 


Worcester 


42,352,820 


4,172 


10,152 



♦ Calendar year (1951). 



174 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



CHART 6 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland and Baltimore 

City: 1951-1952 



Per Capita Income Tax 



County- 
Total State 
Baltimore City 
Total Goiinties 

Montgomery 

Baltimore 

Talbot 

Queen Anne's 

Prince George's 

Washington 

Cecil 

Hovard 

Harford 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel 

Kent 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Charles 

Somerset 

Calvert 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 



2 A 6 8 10 12 U 16 18 2 

1 I T — I — I — I I r I — I 1 




Sources: Report of the CoTiptroUer of the Treasury of Maryland, Fiscal Year 1952; 1951-52 popu- 
lation estimate from Maryland State Health Department. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



CHARTS 7 and 8 

Per Capita Income Payments in Fourteen States, Including Maryland: 1950- 
1951: Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland: 1929-1951 



1 Delaware 

2 wevada 

3 Connecticut 
L, Kew York 

5 California 

6 Illinois 

7 . N»w Z&TZ&^ 

8 Ohio 

9 Veshington 

10 Montana 

11 Massachusetts 

12 Michigan 

13 Wyoming 
U Maryland 



Per Cspit-a Income i^ayracnts (in Hundreds of Doll- rs) 

p — 2 — — 6 — ? y y V i , 6 1 , 8 




UULI 



20 




1929 1935 19a 19-47 

Year 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August 1952. 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



1 




II 






1 




Towson 


Baltimore 
City 




















E 


-4 ^ 




Grand 
Total 





iiilliii 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



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178 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 138 



Total Enrollment* at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fall of 1942-1951 



Fall of 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


1942 


912 


638 


145 


159 


334 


274 


120 


154 


1943 


776 


537 


96 


154 


287 


239 


109 


130 


1944 


684 


440 


83 


120 


237 


244 


110 


134 


1945 


823 


580 


150 


163 


267 


243 


121 


122 


1946 


1,286 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


254 


129 


125 


1947 


1,489 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


311 


152 


159 


1948 


1,704 


1,372 


336 


300 


736 


332 


160 


172 


1949 


2,098 


1.688 


444 


340 


904 


410 


210 


200 


1950 


2,054 


1,634 


441 


273 


920 


420 


221 


199 


1951 


1,944 


1,496 


403 


213 


880 


448 


268 


180 



Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special students. 



TABLE 139— Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1951 



Class 


Grand 
Total 


Maryland State Teachers College Enrollment 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 


TEACHER TRAINING 


Total 


1,646 


1,198 


282 


103 


813 


448 


268 


180 




410 


270 


56 


27 


187 


140 


96 


44 




388 


292 


72 


21 


199 


96 


58 


38 


Junior 


448 


329 


93 


36 


200 


119 


71 


48 


Senior 


400 


307 


61 


19 


227 


93 


43 


50 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Total 


197 


197 


60 


70 


67 1 








136 


136 


33 


61 


42 I 






Sophomore 


61 


61 


27 


9 


25 j 







OTHER STUDENTS 



Extension or Evening 


101 


101 


61 


40 










Elementary School . . 


685 


572 


174 


130 


268 


ii3 


ii3 





Maryland State Department of Education 179 



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1 I I I 1^1 

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180 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 141 — Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges by County 

—Class: Fall of 1951 



Junior College Enrollment in Maryland State Teachers Colleges 



Area 


Grand Total 


White 


Colored 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 




Total 


Fresh- 


Sopho- 


Fresh- 


Sopho- 


rresn- 


Sopho- 


r resn- 


Sopho- 


Fresh- 


Sopho- 


X* resn- 


Sopho- 




men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


Grand Total 


197 


136 


61 


33 


27 


61 


9 


42 


25 










Out-of-state 


13 


11 


2 




2 


11 
















Baltimore City 


30 


16 


14 










16 


14 










Total Counties 


154 


109 


45 


33 


25 


50 


9 


26 


11 












55 


31 


24 


31 


24 


















Anne Arundel. . . . 


4 


2 


2 






i 




i 


2 










Baltimore 


20 


16 


4 










16 


4 










Calvert 


1 




1 












1 












2 


i 


1 






i 
















Carroll 


1 


1 
























Cecil 




























Charles 


2 


i 


i 






i 


















3 


2 


1 






2 


















6 


3 


3 






















Garrett 


1 


1 
























Harford 


1 


1 


























1 


1 
























Kent 




























Montgomery .... 


i 


i 
























Prince George's . . 


1 


























Queen Anne's. . . . 






























i 


i 


























4 


3 








2 
















Talbot 


4 


4 








4 












































Wicomico 


38 


33 








33 


5 
















7 


6 


i 






6 


1 















Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



TABLE 142 — Enrollment in Public Junior Colleges by County: State of Maryland: 

Fall of 1951 





Grand 


Total 


Baltimore 


Haoers- 


Mont- 




Area 


Total 


White 


City 


TOWN 


gomery 


Carver 


Grand Total 


1,023 


990 


382 


168 


440 


33 


Out-of-Country .... 


4 


4 






4 




Out-of-state 


115 


111 


1 


14 


96 


4 


Baltimore City .... 


337 


337 


337 








Total Counties. . . . 


567 


538 


44 


154 


340 


29 


Allegany 


1 


1 




1 






Anne Arundel 


2 


2 


i 




i 






44 


44 


43 




1 




Calvert 


1 


1 






1 




Caroline 














Carroll 














Cecil 




























Dorchester .... 
















3 


'3 






i 


















Harford 














Howard 


'2 


'2 






"2 




Kent 














• Montgomery . . 


324 


295 






295 




Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 


39 


39 






39 
















St. Mary's. . . . 














Somerset 














Talbot 














Washington . . . 


15i 


i5i 




i5i 






Wicomico 














Worcester .... 















182 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 143 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1943-1952 



Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees 


To 
State 



FROSTBURG 



1943 


116 


$ 69,071 


$ 20,757 


$ 48,314 


$ 595 


$ al79 


$ 416 


1944 


75 


*85,257 


13,536 


*71,721 


1,136 


al80 


956 


1945 


73 


*85,601 


14,573 


*71,028 


1,173 


a200 


973 


1946 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


1947 


243 


152,331 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


6203 


672 


1950 


374 


262,317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


6134 


568 


1951 


339 


316,664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


6170 


764 


1952 


338 


318,342 


42,462 


275,880 


942 


6126 


816 



SALISBURY 



1943 


143 


$ 68,922 


$23,185 


$ 45,737 


$ 482 


$ al62 


$ 320 


1944 


114 


*87,428 


22,572 


*64,856 


767 


al98 


569 


1945 


103 


*93,031 


21,157 


*71,874 


903 


a205 


698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22,184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98,266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


6211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


6194 


751 


1951 


200 


268,942 


38,999 


229,943 


1,345 


6195 


1,150 


1952 


174 


282,935 


22,765 


260,170 


1,626 


6131 


1,495 



TOWSON 



1943 


292 


$187,934 


$ 53,264 


$134,670 


$ 644 


$ al83 


$ 461 


1944 


234 


*208,906 


43,145 


*165,761 


892 


al84 


708 


1945 


222 ' 


*211,981 


46,227 


*165,754 


955 


a208 


747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


6164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


6113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


6106 


572 


1951 


879 


633,145 


107,164 


525,981 


720 


6122 


598 


1952 


855 


757,257 


92,816 


664,441 


886 


6109 


777 



BOWIE 



1943 


104 


$ 56,693 


$ 15,960 


$ 40,733 


$ 545 


$ dl53 


$ 392 


1944 


103 


*72,307 


14,939 


*57,368 


702 


dU5 


557 


1945 


103 


*76,536 


15,099 


*61,437 


743 


rfl45 


598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


cl41 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


/151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


/181 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


/127 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


/155 


885 


1952 


262 


261,264 


32,810 


228,454 


997 


/1 2 5 


872 



COPPIN 



1951 


195 
177 


$57,054 
59,415 




$57,054 
59,415 


$293 
336 




$293 
336 


1952 













* Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

h In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee, 

/ Resident students paid $171, There is no tuition fee except for out-of-state and junior college 
students. 



Maryland State Department of Education 183 



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184 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 146 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active 
Service and Their Contributions: Year Ending July 31, 1952 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1952 



Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1952 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments. 

Junior Colleges 

Hagerstown 

Montgomery 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys . . 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School 
St. Mary's Seminary — Jr. College 



$1,347,264.80 
$1,256,969.04 



90, 
87, 
216, 
12, 
19 
39 
29 
24 
26 
51 
25 
46 
22 
17 
190 
144 
15 
12 
19 
14 
90 
35 
23 



386.42 
861.39 
279.64 
533.15 
,620.37 
,593.38 
,049.55 
,861.22 
,001.09 
,178.84 
,811.81 
,154.02 
,734.89 
,711.86 
,011.09 
,723.87 
,727.07 
,304.47 
,969.09 
,439.64 
,263.62 
,818.19 
,934.37 



$90,295.76 

$ 7,699.64 
2,814.44 
4,885.20 

$40,698.50 
4,299.04 
2,224.61 
8,641.70 
6,541.52 
18,991.63 

$25,286.93 
5,409.85 
19,493.08 
384.00 

$16,610.69 
1,333.80 
5,006.20 
6,635.39 
1,199.00 
2,043.40 
1,392.90 



7,861 

7,466 

541 
525 
1,269 

87 
127 
251 
192 
165 
167 
303 
158 
280 
143 
104 
959 
881 
107 

81 
133 

95 
501 
236 
161 

395 

33 
14 
19 

170 
21 
9 
31 
29 
80 

107 
38 
67 
2 

85 
6 

25 

25 
9 

11 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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189 



TABLE 151 



Crippled Children's Program by County and Diagnostic Category: Distribution of 
Children Receiving Services of Maryland State Department of Health: 1952 



County 


Total 

of 
Chil- 
dren 


Dlagnostic Category 


Cerebral 
Palsy 


Epi- 
lepsy 


Sight 
Conser- 
vation 


Speech- 
Hearing 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Plastic 


Cardiac 


Other 
Crip- 
pling 
Condi- 
tions 


Total State 


10,066 


545 


402 


1,113 


3,894 


3,291 


254 


ool 


86 


Baltimore City . . 


249 


80 








151 


9 


4 


6 


Total Counties . . . 


9,817 


465 


402 


1,113 


3.894 


3,140 


246 


527 


31 


Allegany .... 


976 


67 


35 


1 


48 


757 


64 




4 


Anne Arundel 


839 


34 


49 


1 


316 


230 


20 


185 


4 


Baltimore. . . 


671 


88 


38 




492 


46 


3 


4 




Calvert 


159 


3 


6 


46 


56 


43 


5 






Caroline .... 


187 


5 


1 




122 


58 


1 






Carroll 


129 


13 


22 




51 


39 


2 




2 


Cecil 


290 


14 


12 




138 


75 


5 


45 


1 




515 


11 


30 


272 


125 


56 


5 


18 


3 


Dorchester . . 


147 


5 


13 




92 


33 


4 






Frederick . . . 


372 


32 


24 




94 


187 


27 


6 


2 


Garrett 


306 


11 


2 




33 


241 


17 


2 




Harford 


510 


21 


6 




362 


117 


2 


1 


i 


Howard 


221 


9 


1 


88 


82 


35 


5 


1 




Kent 


281 


2 


12 


134 


86 


47 








Montgomery 


1,501 


37 


43 


395 


629 


147 


23 


224 


3 


Pr. George's 


340 


55 


12 


1 


147 


113 


6 


6 


1 


Queen Anne's 


62 


7 


2 






49 


4 






St. Mary's . . 


356 


3 


18 


i7i 


5 


138 


2 


i9 




Somerset .... 


194 


3 


3 




83 


99 


6 






Talbot 


82 


1 


1 




54 


23 


2 


1 




Washington . 


950 


32 


28 


3 


615 


243 


24 


1 


4 


Wicomico . . . 


596 


9 


42 


1 


226 


282 


11 


20 


5 


Worcester . . . 


133 


3 


2 




38 


82 


7 




1 



190 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 152 

Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the Maryland State 
Department of Health: Year Ending December 31, 1952 



County 


Number of 
Clinicians 


Time* 
Given to 
Service 


Number of 
Children 


Number of 


Ex- 
ammed by 
Dentist 


Treated 


Total 
tions 


Fillings 
Inserted 


Teeth 
Extracted 


Clean- 
ings 


Treat- 
ments 




35 




33,227 


6,304 


28,094 


15,010 


5,739 


3,300 


4,045 




1 


Full 


4,349 


901 


3,264 


397 


1,586 


284 


997 




1 


Part 


700 


194 


845 


498 


347 








19 


Part 


10,829 


2,202 


12,750 


8,165 


1,797 


1,679 


1,109 


Calvert 


2 


Part 


950 


333 


1,362 


576 


283 


4 


499 


Charles 


2 


** 


5,318 


116 


372 


150 


151 


67 


4 


Frederick 




Part 


522 


421 


964 


829 


71 


1 


63 


Harford 


5 


Part 


1,131 


229 


1,279 


635 


307 


259 


78 




1 


Part 


91 


16 


135 


43 


36 


42 


14 


Kent 


1 


Part 


116 


67 


271 


62 


190 


3 


16 


Montgomery 


1 


Full 


7,257 


732 


2,516 


1,367 


516 


14 


619 




1 


Full 


1,964 


1,093 


4,336 


2,288 


455 


947 


646 



* The scope of service varies, either full-time or part-time, meaning one or more one-day clinics per month. 
*♦ 1 full-time dental hygienist and 1 part-time dental clinician. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Maryland State Department of Education 195 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Source or Purpose Amount 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Forwarded from 1950-1951 $ 4,069.84 

General Fund Appropriation 544,647.00 

Receipts to Budget Items 94,750.22 

Transfer from Public Schools 15,000.00 

Transfer from Misc. Appropriation No. 7 44,061.00 



Total Funds Available $702 528.06 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages and Special Payments $580,258.13 

General Repairs 642.50 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 1,344.41 

Light, Heat, Power and Water 42.00 

Travel 31,512.87 

Transportation 700.64 

Communication 13,250.83 

Printing Other than Office Supplies 2,926.78 

All Other Contractual Services 39.50 

Office Supplies 5,631.91 

Educational, Vocational, and Recreational Supplies 9,256.98 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 6,081.79 

Office Equipment 4,296.24 

Motor Vehicles 3,393.38 

Educational, Vocational, and Recreational Equipment 83.53 

Household Equipment 362.00 

Rent 1,704.45 

Insurance 949.70 



Total Disbursements $662,477.64 

Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury $ 21,648.62 

Balance, June 30, 1952 $18,401.80 



196 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Maryland State Teachers Colleges Financial Statement: Fiscal Year Ending 

June 30, 1952 



Source or Purpose 


TOWSON 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


RECEIPTS 


Balance forwarded from 1950-51 . 
General Fund Appropriation 


$ 7,001.50 
616,823.00 
118,363.81 
45,986.06 
74,563.00 


$ 17,958.61 
253,133.00 
44,587.00 
33,866.78 
30,139.00 


$ 15,485.90 
226,216.00 
36,119.53 
16,099.82 
26,471.00 


$ 8,960.03 
208,531.00 
48,515.74 
10,739.30 
32,925.00 


$ 6,118.14 
68,459.00 


Receipts to Budget Items 

Transfers by Budget Amendments 

Total Funds Available 


2,918.53 
1,541.00 


$862,737.37 


$379,684.39 


$320,392.25 


$309,671.07 


$79,036.67 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, and Special Pay- 
ments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power, and Water . . 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing, Other than Office 

Supplies 

All Other Contractual Services . . . 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies . . 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies . 

Laundry, Cleaning, and Disin- 
fecting Supplies 

Refrigeration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical Sup- 
plies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Materials 

Equipment Materials 

Highway Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory Equip- 
ment 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Equipment 

Motor Vehicles 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Equipment 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Cafeteria 

Veterans' Clearing Account 

Prior Year Funds 

Refunds on Students' Fees 

Summer Session 



Total Disbursements 



Unexpended Balance Re- 
turned to State Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1952 



$605,838.70 $257,463.17 
1,854.51 
210.78 
4,496.72 
1,285.38 
24.01 
1,874.92 

1,403.09 
2,862.65 
33,783.80 



2,838.43 
1,533.27 
13,064.86 
1,499.45 
116.21 
5,725.12 

3,183.29 
486.22 
81,434.76 



19,704.74 
3,466.13 
483.88 

2,476.70 
167.00 

5,854.45 

401.44 
1,992.07 

477.17 

346.06 
5,974.88 

967.21 
6,265.67 



346.52 
29.00 



2,085.30 
702.48 



5,589.31 
621.96 
226.84 

371.01 



3,135.06 

395.19 
1,460.29 
98.95 



2,050.15 
48.20 
1,223.16 



597.10 
2,183.11 



104.46 



899.80 




2,152.46 


2,736.31 


10,999.41 


5,363.98 


1,107.43 




282.18 




181.70 


40.00 


606.57 


186.32 


623.00 


522.00 


672.83 




14,134.29 


30,227.74 


9,175.04 


17,958.61 


1,431.50 




13,859.66 





$209,146.82 
3,961.22 
497.16 
6,373.53 
882.79 
16.50 
1,846.01 

854.40 
2,499.63 
23,750.79 



$823,586. 



$380,398.78 



$ 2,026.52 $ 88.89 
$ 37,123.97 $ *803.28 



5,719.18 
617.55 
410.36 

1,499.31 
27.10 

2,694.43 

749.37 
1,205.05 



2,897.49 
39.88 
2,477.44 



204.00 
14.21 
471.40 
1,361.56 

1,487.54 

1,736.51 
1,863.13 

4,842.61 
134.13 



452.98 



11,645.19 
9,051.11 
114.00 



$192,103.27 
2,926.71 
389.62 
10,432.90 
190.07 
73.98 
1,396.50 

674.30 
475.00 
48,205.92 
1,108.92 
•5,956.92 
.599.71 
272.37 

935.58 



2,066.22 

160.02 
1,480.13 
113.22 



1,927.08 
631.74 



3.54 
110.03 



210.60 
360.91 



117.89 



1,347.81 



3,469.85 
36.15 



798.00 



8,963.08 
2,884.06 
4.00 
1,660.00 



$301,544.38 j $292,086.10 \ $72,431.43 

$ 14,360.13 I $ 8,771.14 i $ 1,680.90 
$ 4,487.74 I $ 8,813.83 $ 4,924.34 



Deficit 



198 



Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 



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230 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland County 



County 
Name of High School 



Total 










Social 






Mathe- 






Enrollment 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


3 649 


o ,000 


290 


235 


3 357 


3 303 


3 005 


2 941 


3 100 


2 753 


3 001 


2 605 


1 00 


100 
0118 


'lOl 


115 






101 


115 


101 


115 


' 97 


106 


101 


112 






128 


118 


12 


14 


116 


104 


116 


104 


95 


91 


95 


84 

0-1 






925 


yol 






y^o 


934 


78Q 

/ oy 


789 
/ Oi 


782 


695 


792 


R9'; 

DZO 


40 
40 


OS 

yo 


792 


757 






790 


757 


703 


632 


642 


587 


630 


587 


51 


71 
/ 


319 


318 


42 


34 


277 


284 


236 


268 


290 


257 


246 


1 8'; 
100 


14 
01 


10 
00 


100 


96 


42 


32 


58 


64 


58 


64 


96 


78 


83 


85 






277 


255 


34 


25 


243 


230 


231 


220 


219 


193 


215 


188 


31 


14 
01 


ouo 


500 


1R 
ID 


D 


549 


494 


473 


435 


470 


321 


430 


312 


98 
^0 


RO 
DO 


112 


126 


54 


43 


58 


83 


58 


83 


112 


126 


112 


126 






78 


81 






78 


81 


78 


81 


78 


81 


78 


81 






70 


7"^ 


70 


7"^ 










70 


10 


70 
/u 


1 






127 


112 


20 


g 


107 


106 


167 


106 


107 


106 


107 


106 






OO 








00 


Ol 


00 


51 


42 


^7 
0/ 


42 


oy 






3 661 


3 915 


1 661 


1 622 


1 999 


2 293 


1 784 


2 098 


2 639 


2 483 


2 925 


2 954 


11 


142 


493 




492 


528 


353 


'413 


417 


261 


'28I 


257 


24 


58 




Ooo 






491 


000 


423 


532 


272 


310 


311 


336 


44 


78 
/O 


180 


171 






180 


171 


152 


155 


166 


140 


131 


118 






432 


^00 


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11 7 
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191 


lOD 


109 


138 


274 


290 


383 


404 






362 


347 


362 


347 










236 


205 


236 


205 






182 


lyo 


191 


1 11 

loo 


fii 

Dl 


62 


gj 


62 


113 


129 


113 


129 






i/y 


/1R9 


470 


4R9 










479 


462 


479 


462 






390 


oDo 


oyu 


1R1 
oDo 










390 


363 


390 


363 






790 








720 


898 
OiO 


R8R 
DOD 


798 


292 


323 


601 


680 


g 


g 


8 109 


Q QQ1 
8 ,oy 1 


,0^11 


t\ 119 


2 650 


3 059 


2 635 


3 043 


7 495 


7 189 


7 071 


6 344 


242 


329 


yoo 


Q7C 

y/8 


H7Q 


i;(;4 


1Q0 

oyu 


424 


188 

000 


424 


908 


'g04 


779 


690 


59 


83 


DoU 


DOD 


404 


101 
00 1 


99R 
<2^0 


971; 


222 


268 


592 


546 


540 


477 


31 


30 




OoU 


901 
ZUl 


1 OR 

lyo 


104 


134 


104 


134 


243 


232 


272 


241 


g 


18 


180 


198 


64 


56 


116 


142 


116 


142 


134 


168 


112 


104 






771 


885 


266 


280 


505 


605 


502 


598 


554 


582 


594 


525 


64 


74 


n99 


919 


576 


535 


14R 
040 


004 


141 


109 
00^ 


8RR 
ODD 


740 

/ 4y 


718 
/ 00 


603 


37 


34 


Tin 


7 in 

/ -JU 


1 '}9 


117 
1 1 / 


dOQ 

oyo 


fi91 
DiO 


oyo 


623 


579 


514 


454 


312 


42 


90 


451 


502 


260 


247 


191 


255 


191 


255 


402 


424 


369 


283 






71 


62 


71 


62 










71 


62 


71 


62 






fin 
ou 


DO 


RO 
DU 


R1 










60 


63 


60 


63 






71 


66 


71 


66 










71 


66 


71 


66 






615 


610 


615 


OlU 










615 


610 


615 


610 








DR 

yo 


103 


OR 










103 


96 


103 


96 






1 ,232 


1 ,201 

386 


1 ,232 


1 ,201 










1 232 


1 201 


1 232 


1 201 






442 


442 


386 










442 


lOR 
OOD 


442 


386 






97 


90 


64 


61 


33 


29 


33 


29 


97 


90 


89 


79 






172 


192 


135 


119 


37 


73 


37 


73 


171 


192 


167 


177 






354 


398 


250 


283 


104 


115 


104 


1 1 d 
110 


111 
000 


18<i 
000 


141 
Oil 


350 






22 


19 


22 


19 










99 


10 

ly 


99 


10 

ly 






50i 


51f 


256 


244 




071 


911 


^DD 


420 


430 


438 


441 


21 


30 


309 


28C 


145 


111 


164 


175 


1 RA 


1 71; 
1/0 


9S0 

zoy 


911 

^01 


9R8 
^00 


232 


21 


30 


191 


232 


111 


133 


80 


96 


69 


91 


1 R1 

101 


1 00 
lyy 


170 
1 /K 


209 






794 


735 


355 


301 


439 


438 


490 


490 

4iy 


719 
/ 1^ 


fiRO 
DDI* 


632 


608 




33 


15J 


152 


76 


84 


82 


68 


82 


RK 
00 


1 (11 
101 


1 9t; 
1^0 


1 1 8 
110 


1 19 






174 


156 


79 


52 


95 


104 


89 


IOC 


1 R1 
101 


1 11 
lol 


1 1"; 
100 


1 1R 

lOD 


g 


14 


87 


69 


36 


26 


51 


43 


K1 

01 


41 
40 


87 
0/ 


RQ 

oy 


58 


46 


4 


7 


153 


141 


63 


49 


90 


92 


90 


91 


128 


115 


133 


117 


4 


12 


51 


40 


23 


16 


28 


24 


28 


24 


51 


40 


49 


38 






171 


181 


78 


74 


93 


107 


88 


106 


114 
104 


1 QO 


1 10 
loy 


1 tl9 
10^ 






1 ,623 


1 ,651 






1 ,623 


1 ,651 


1 ,580 


1 RIO 
1 ,00^ 


1 4R0 
1 ,^DU 


1 189 

1 ,00<i 


1 316 


1 165 


23 


54 


166 


151 






166 


151 


140 


1 R1 

loi 


1 VI 


1 1 
1 10 


139 


116 


g 


15 


19C 


187 






190 


187 


190 


187 


1 00 
lOU 


1 t;i 
101 


1 RS 

100 


131 






140 


162 






140 


162 


140 


162 


1 94 
1J4 


14 1 
144 


119 

11^ 


123 






544 


547 






544 


547 


541 


538 


477 


A1K. 
400 


441; 

440 


11R 

000 






lis 


104 






118 


104 


111 


102 


1 OS 
lUO 


00 


78 
/O 


62 






88 


101 






88 


101 


88 


1 ni 
lUl 


07 
0/ 


00 
80 


R1 
DO 


74 






94 


92 






94 


92 


87 


84 


77 


86 


66 


62 






158 


172 






158 


172 


158 


172 


128 


140 


120 


126 






41 


55 






41 


55 


41 


55 


41 


55 


41 


55 






75 


67 






75 


67 


75 


67 


75 


67 


75 


67 






9 


13 






9 


13 


9 


13 


9 


13 


9 


13 






1,301 


1,241 


371 


357 


930 


884 


914 


856 


1,119 


1,010 


1,163 


1,011 


9 


8 


97 


84 


48 


27 


49 


57 


49 


57 


49 


57 


97 


84 






90 


83 






90 


83 


90 


83 


69 


66 


86 


83 






378 


310 


79 


58 


299 


252 


299 


252 


327 


247 


321 


255 




'8 


224 


236 


93 


109 


131 


127 


131 


127 


206 


201 


214 


178 






200 


227 


86 


85 


114 


142 


98 


114 


163 


172 


157 


148 






142 


131 




142 


131 


142 


131 


142 


107 


118 


93 






42 


30 


28 


24 


14 


6 


14 


6 


42 


30 


42 


30 






34 


36 


23 


25 


11 


11 


11 


11 


34 


36 


34 


36 






94 


104 


14 


29 


80 


75 


80 


75 


87 


94 


94 


104 







Allegany 

Oldtown Sr.-Jr 

Flintstone Sr.-Jr , 

Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

Allegany Sr.-Jr 

Bruce Sr.-Jr 

Barton Sr.-Jr 

Central Sr.-Jr 

Beall Sr.-Jr 

Cresaptown Jr 

Mt. Savage Jr 

Penn Ave. Elem. — Jr. . 

Beall Elem.— Jr 

Carver Colored Sr.-Jr. 

Anne Arundel 

Glen Burnie Sr 

Annapolis Sr.-Jr 

Southern Sr.-Jr 

Arundel Sr.-Jr 

George Fox Jr 

Brooklyn Park Jr. . . . 

Glen Burnie Jr 

Annapolis Jr 

Bates Colored Sr.-Jr. . 



26 Baltimore 

26 Catonsville Sr.-Jr 

27 Milford Mill Sr.-Jr 

28 Franklin Sr.-Jr 

29 Sparks Sr.-Jr 

30 Towson Sr.-Jr 

31 Dundalk Sr.-Jr 

32 Kenwood Sr.-Jr 

33 Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 

34 Fifth District Jr 

35 Sixth District Jr 

36 Seventh District Jr 

37 Towson Jr 

38 Carroll Manor Jr 

39 Stemmers Run Jr 

40 10 Elem. with Jr. 7th 

41 Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 

42 Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 

43 Sollers Point Colored Sr.-Jr. 

44 Bragg Colored Elem.— Jr.. . 

45 Calvert 

46 Calvert County Sr.-Jr 

47 Brooks Colored Sr.-Jr 

48 Caroline 

49 Greensboro Sr.-Jr 

60 Caroline Sr.-Jr 

61 Preston Sr.-Jr 

62 Federalsburg Sr.-Jr 

63 Ridgely Sr.-Jr 

64 Lockerman Colored Sr.-Jr. . 

65 Carroll 

66 Taneytown Sr.-Jr 

57 Sykesville Sr.-Jr 

58 Manchester Sr.-Jr 

59 Westminster Sr.-Jr 

60 Hampstead Sr.-Jr 

61 New Windsor Sr.-Jr 

62 Elmer Wolfe Sr.-Jr 

63 Mount Airy Sr.-Jr 

64 Charles Carroll Jr 

65 Moton Colored Sr.-Jr 

66 Johnsville Colored Elem.— J 

67 Cecil 

68 Cecilton Sr.-Jr 

69 Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 

70 Elkton Sr.-Jr 

71 North East Sr.-Jr 

72 Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 

73 Perry ville Sr.-Jr 

74 Kenmore Jr 

75 Calvert Jr 

76 Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 231 



Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economcs 


Business 
Subjects 


Phy.sical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


* 

Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


X 

Edu. 


Gen. 


a 

Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


47 


91 


53 


78 


146 


181 


1 ,752 




159 




1,660 


380 


816 


1,302 2,681 


2 ,377 


2,254 2,485 


1,196 


1,191 


2 










49 


52 










69 


46 






101 


110 


83 


111 






3 










29 


99 


17 








20 


84 






122 


96 


73 


108 






4 


• • 




27 


14 




30 


396 




li2 




451 


43 


146 


465 


693 


574 


560 


503 


553 


524 


5 


16 


26 


26 


64 


41 




414 








364 


37 


265 


216 


573 


524 


495 


490 


312 


293 


6 


3 


13 










137 




47 




113 


90 


62 


106 


255 


216 


272 


243 




.. 


7 














96 








78 




28 


24 


93 


72 


77 


87 






8 


i6 


23 










172 








177 




96 


87 


193 


184 


231 






9 


12 


29 






27 




353 








246 


55 


219 


404 


251 


197 


281 


284 


178 


216 


10 














112 








126 








112 


126 


112 


126 






11 






























78 


81 


78 


81 


46 


52 


12 






























70 


75 


70 


75 






13 






























127 


112 


107 


106 


107 


106 


14 














55 








16 


25 






13 


10 


46 


40 




15 


1/2 


206 


34 


98 


42 


103 


2,799 




350 




2,676 
201 


291 


190 


747 


3,552 


3,575 


2,525 


2,773 


1,747 1,662 


16 


58 


56 










150 




208 






29 


229 


401 


271 


74 


195 


54 


58 


17 


63 


73 


22 


36 






274 








289 




72 


304 


423 


531 


1G5 


140 


79 


126 


18 


5 


14 






32 


22 


116 








153 




35 


54 


i^? 


167 


100 


138 






19 


27 


31 






10 


33 


353 








317 


80 


42 


72 


431 


469 


304 


285 


254 


258 


20 














362 








347 








362 


347 


292 
61 


302 


196 


187 


21 














182 








133 








182 


195 


62 




62 


22 














479 








462 








479 


462 


479 


462 


479 


462 


23 


• ■ 












390 








363 








390 


363 


390 


363 


390 


363 


24 


19 


32 


12 


62 




48 


493 




142 




411 


2ii 


12 


88 


704 


770 


720 


826 


295 


146 


25 


239 


280 


228 


230 


28 


101 


4,836 


13 


207 


15 


4,272 


356 


821 


2,084 


8,084 


8,238 6,245 6,275 5,287 5,120 


26 


8 


26 


34 


22 






'703 








601 


67 


195 


294 


944 


938 


677 


679 


630 


590 


27 


22 


32 


21 


21 






392 


'2 






228 


108 


88 


186 


630 


655 


442 


410 


431 


416 


28 


14 


20 








38 


199 








152 


37 


29 


101 


302 


328 


236 


264 


124 


154 


29 


6 


13 








63 


52 








32 


35 


23 


80 


180 


198 


78 


96 


64 


56 


30 


48 


67 


101 


143 






372 


8 


71 


15 


494 


66 


99 


332 


724 


875 


313 


362 


322 


355 


31 


47 


27 










629 








585 




151 


320 


901 


876 


627 


594 


638 


556 


32 


39 


54 


72 


44 






477 


'2 


Do 




210 




185 


445 


713 


713 


303 


355 


168 
124 


150 


33 


30 


16 










361 


1 


52 




285 


i9 


45 


222 


451 


482 


322 


337 


135 


34 














45 








36 








71 


62 


71 


62 


51 


47 


35 














38 








37 








60 
71 


63 


60 


63 


60 


63 


36 














37 








39 








66 


71 


66 


71 


66 


37 














293 








288 








615 


610 
96 


615 


610 


322 


322 


38 














63 








63 








103 


103 


96 


103 


96 


39 














779 








763 








1,232 1.201, 1,232] 1,201 1,232 


1,231 


40 






























442 


386 


442 


386 


442 


386 


41 














72 








80 








97 


90 


97 


78 


80 


72 


42 


• • 












110 








152 








172 


184 


172 


179 


153 


153 


43 


25 


25 










214 








227 


24 


6 


104 


354 


396 


362 


418 


250 


283 


44 






























22 


19 


22 


19 


22 


19 


45 


9 


12 






44 


88 


290 








295 


64 


44 


96 


376 


383 


340 


364 


14 


20 


46 


4 


6 






21 


49 


197 








182 




44 


96 


194 


162 


196 


163 






47 


5 


6 






23 


39 


93 








113 


64 






182 


221 


144 


201 


14 


20 


48 


12 


23 






55 


133 


515 






1 


482 


30 


80 


144 


784 


701 


490 


612 


50 


32 


49 


7 












140 








100 




25 


43 


156 


151 


95 


152 






50 


5 


16 






30 


25 


111 






1 


98 




34 


71 


172 


137 


112 


136 






51 












51 


36 








69 








87 


69 










52 














145 








96 




21 


30 


153 


138 


107 


121 






53 










25 




18 
















49 


37 


8 


25 






54 












57 


65 








119 


30 






167 


169 


168 


178 


50 


32 


55 


38 


75 


2 


13 


19 


128 


1 348 




28 


1 


1 283 




328 


481 


1,579 


1,537 1,390' 1,525 


379 


35'J 


56 












40 


157 








'l42 




35 


50 


166 


129 


158 


149 






57 


5 


16 










159 








142 




38 


60 


190 


181 


153 


157 






58 


11 


12 










126 








129 




36 


42 


137 


159 


119 


145 






59 


6 


15 


2 


13 




32 


396 




28 




380 




93| 173 


503 


477 


415 


513 


348 


327 


60 


11 


g 










93 








85 




38 


37 


118 


104 


104 


98 


22 


19 


61 


1 












86 








88 




31 


31 88 


101 


88 


101 




62 












30 


81 








77 




35 


33 


94 


86 


92 


92 






63 


4 


23 






i9 


26 


134 








118 




22 


55 


158 165 


136 


135 . 




64 














41 








55 








41 


55 


41 


55 






65 














75 








67 








75 


67 


75 


67 






66 






























9 


13 


9 


13 


9 


13 


67 


17 


13 


43 


50 


41 




1,013 


36 




34 


826 


37 


135 


320 


1,054 


913 


873 


862 




30 


68 


2 


7 










88 








56 






32 


93: 82, 59 


651 




69 














81 








56 




5 


29 


86 


751 60 


48 






70 






14 


i9 






261 








196 




65 


90 


' 310 


207, 259! 193 






71 






22 


24 






154 








147 




26 


59 


, 179 171 115 


148 






72 






7 


7 


41 




133 








159 




29 


78 


191 


' 187 


116 161 


! 




73 


is 


6 










126 








109 




3 


32 


101 


87 


101 


87 






74 














42 




















42 


30 


■ 30 


75 














34 


36 




34 


36 












34 


36 






76 














94 








67 


37 






94 


104 


87 


94 


1 





232 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII— Continued— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates, Each 



County 
Name of High School 



Total 
Enrollment 



Core 



English 



Social 

Studies Science 



Mathe- 



B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


911 


982 


458 


479 


453 


503 


453 


503 


806 


809 


776 


770 


35 


10 


69 


87 






69 


87 


69 


87 


49 


49 


25 


20 






259 


271 


lie 


119 


143 


152 


143 


152 


185 


165 


179 


147 


35 


io 


33 


36 


29 


20 


4 


16 


4 


16 


33 


36 


33 


36 






58 


40 






58 


40 


58 


40 


58 


40 


58 


40 






131 


119 


124 


114 


7 


5 


7 


5 


131 


119 


131 


119 






63 


41 






63 


41 


63 


41 


63 


41 


63 


41 






138 


198 


7i 


98 


67 


100 


67 


100 


132 


185 


132 


193 






160 


190 


118 


128 


42 


62 


42 


62 


155 


174 


155 


174 






939 


889 


154 


158 


785 


731 


749 


669 


841 


815 


748 


734 


31 


42 


53 


42 


14 


4 


39 


38 


39 


38 


48 


41 


53 


42 






47 


46 


10 


20 


37 


26 


26 


21 


39 


41 


47 


46 






35 


47 


16 


21 


19 


26 


19 


26 


29 


34 


16 


21 






18 


14 


9 


3 


9 


11 


9 


11 


18 


14 


18 


14 






269 


254 






269 


254 


249 


197 


253 


233 


205 


186 


31 


42 


129 


114 


55 


41 


74 


73 


72 


73 


96 


94 


90 


79 






175 


161 






175 


161 


175 


161 


175 


161 


175 


161 






213 


211 


50 


69 


163 


142 


160 


142 


183 


197 


144 


185 






2,237 


2,117 


1,314 


1,171 


923 


946 


850 


929 


1,160 


1,018 


1,628 


1,433 


111 


220 


639 


620 


218 


201 


421 


419 


419 


415 


489 


431 


366 


296 


80 


132 


256 


263 


166 


153 


90 


110 


71 


129 


147 


159 


180 


179 


5 


42 


98 


77 


64 


45 


34 


32 


35 


32 


45 


38 


78 


65 


18 


25 


252 


234 


157 


148 


95 


86 


45 


57 


141 


96 


173 


162 


8 


21 


203 


209 


123 


107 


80 


102 


77 


99 


111 


92 


112 


87 






141 


124 


55 


41 


86 


83 


86 


83 


74 


82 


115 


100 






401 


366 


401 


366 














401 


366 






87 


74 


61 


50 


26 


24 


26 


24 


26 


24 


87 


74 






160 


150 


69 


60 


91 


90 


91 


90 


127 


96 


116 


104 






899 


878 


899 


878 






17 


9 


441 


411 


720 


676 


7 


33 


120 


109 


120 


109 






17 


9 


51 


40 


86 


76 






146 


183 


146 


183 










62 


101 


111 


159 






112 


83 


112 


83 










69 


43 


88 


76 






449 


430 


449 


430 










206 


191 


364 


305 


'i 


33 


72 


73 


72 


73 










53 


36 


71 


60 






1,828 


1,854 


1,158 


1,119 


670 


735 


582 


674 


862 


801 


1,606 


1,498 


63 


90 


259 


252 


160 


146 


99 


106 


97 


103 


111 


99 


204 


183 


11 


19 


729 


722 


471 


440 


258 


282 


187 


260 


319 


275 


688 


594 


20 


29 


367 


396 


242 


242 


125 


154 


112 


136 


163 


150 


308 


304 


3 


26 


244 


252 


143 


151 


101 


101 


99 


83 


107 


105 


209 


211 


19 


16 


143 


136 


94 


83 


49 


53 


49 


53 


76 


76 


143 


136 






86 


96 


48 


57 


38 


39 


38 


39 


86 


96 


54 


70 






872 


882 


581 


539 


291 


343 


289 


336 


702 


696 


742 


676 


36 


27 


173 


201 


124 


121 


49 


80 


49 


80 


167 


172 


161 


168 


13 


11 


217 


212 


135 


119 


82 


93 


82 


93 


142 


123 


173 


148 


20 


12 


155 


154 


97 


105 


58 


49 


56 


49 


142 


134 


139 


132 






149 


146 


97 


91 


52 


55 


52 


49 


146 


124 


115 


107 


3 


4 


178 


169 


128 


103 


50 


66 


50 


65 


105 


143 


154 


121 






547 


504 


340 


274 


206 


230 


205 


230 


499 


446 


434 


378 


13 


36 


56 


56 


33 


25 


23 


31 


23 


31 


54 


44 


53 


41 


1 


10 


226 


202 


147 


115 


78 


87 


78 


87 


186 


167 


160 


134 


9 


18 


91 


69 


59 


41 


32 


28 


31 


28 


85 


58 


70 


48 


3 


8 


23 


20 






23 


20 


23 


20 


23 


20 


23 


20 






151 


157 


loi 


93 


50 


64 


50 


64 


151 


157 


128 


135 






5,200 
669 


5,253 


1,942 


1,931 


3,247 


3.319 


2,771 
480 


2,880 


3,961 


3,615 


4,450 


3,889 


313 


519 


645 


665 


644 


437 


495 


396 


596 


352 


103 


126 


804 


788 






799 


786 


716 


751 


570 


443 


536 


276 


81 


117 


131 


122 


67 


56 


64 


66 


54 


56 


124 


110 


95 


86 






440 


420 


229 


188 


211 


232 


173 


199 


330 


330 


364 


252 


27 


30 


225 


222 


119 


88 


106 


134 


76 


102 


202 


173 


176 


150 






309 


332 


152 


150 


156 


182 


87 


124 


276 


274 


188 


167 






134 


148 


72 


70 


61 


78 


62 


74 


115 


127 


102 


102 






578 


643 


578 


643 










315 


318 


578 


643 


47 


97 


171 


205 






171 


205 


17i 


205 


164 


185 


170 


205 


8 


19 


427 


424 






427 


424 


426 


424 


389 


350 


427 


423 


15 


63 


445 


401 


306 


279 


139 


122 


138 


122 


277 


204 


445 


401 


27 


47 


261 


253 


195 


172 


66 


81 


66 


81 


152 


140 


261 


253 


5 


20 


232 


208 






232 


208 


232 


208 


232 


208 


232 


208 






150 


157 






150 


157 


90 


97 


96 


72 


58 


86 






224 


285 


224 


285 










224 


285 


222 


285 







1 Charles 

2 Lackey Sr 

3 La Plata Sr.-Jr 

4 Nanjemoy Jr 

5 Glasva Jr 

6 Indian Head Jr 

7 Hughesville Jr 

8 Be! Alton Colored Sr.-Jr 

9 Pomonkey Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 

10 Dorchester 

11 East New Market Sr.-Jr. . . . 

12 Vienna Sr.-Jr 

13 Crapo Sr.-Jr 

14 Hoopers Island Sr.-Jr 

15 Cambridge Sr.-Jr 

16 Hurlock Sr.-Jr 

17 Cambridge Jr 

18 F.D. St. Clair Colored Sr.-Jr. 

19 Frederick 

20 Frederick Sr.-Jr 

21 Middletown Sr.-Jr 

22 Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 

23 Thurmont Sr.-Jr 

24 Brunswick Sr.-Jr 

25 Walkersville Sr.-Jr 

26 Elm St. Jr 

27 Liberty Jr 

28 Lincoln Colored Sr.-Jr 

29 Garrett 

30 Friendsville Sr.-Jr 

31 Grantsville Sr.-Jr 

32 Accident Sr.-Jr 

33 Oakland Sr.-Jr 

34 Kitzmiller Sr.-Jr 

35 Harford 

36 Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 

37 Bel Air Sr.-Jr 

38 North Harford Sr.-Jr 

39 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 

40 Central Consol. Col. Sr.-Jr. . 

41 Havre de Grace Col. Sr.-Jr. . 

42 Howard 

43 Elkridge Sr.-Jr 

44 Ellicott City Sr.-Jr 

45 Lisbon Sr.-Jr 

46 Clarksville Sr.-Jr 

47 Harriet Tubman Col. Sr.-Jr. 

48 Kent 

49 Galena Sr.-Jr 

50 Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

51 Rock HaU Sr.-Jr 

52 Millington Jr 

53 Garnett Colored Sr.-Jr 

54 Montgomery 

55 Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. . . 

56 Montgomery Blair Sr 

57 Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

58 Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr. 

59 Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

60 Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr 

61 Damascus Sr.-Jr 

62 Leland Jr 

63 Western Jr 

64 Takoma Park Jr 

65 Montgomery Hills Jr 

66 Kensington Jr 

67 Eastern Jr 

68 Carver Colored Sr 

69 Lincoln Colored Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 233 



Maryland County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


j Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


* 

Gen. 


1 t 
1 Voc. 


Arts 


1 t° 
Edu 


Gen. 


1 a 
\ Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


18 


1£ 






21 


7J 


53? 








42S 


lOS 




236 


80f 


\ 89C 


82J 


874 


134 


132 


2 


18 


1£ 










3^ 








IC 


. 


24 


64 


4J 


51 


6C 


) 85 






3 












3r 


164 








136 


2i 


4-1 


121 


25c 


271 


231 


215 






4 














25 
















2J 


34 










5 














58 








4C 












58 


40 






6 














9C 








86 








131 


lig 


131 


119 


IOC 


85 


7 














63 








41 








63 


41 


63 


41 






8 










ie 


45 










36 


5\ 


'c 


ia 


122 


184 


122 


184 


34 


47 


9 














101 








73 


26 


IC 


38 


16C 


190 


16C 


190 






10 


19 


55 








104 


439 


4 


24 




494 




146 


215 


880 


834 


548 


537 


296 


298 


11 


3 


8 








25 


51 


4 






37 








S3 


40 










12 


5 


8 








17 


36 








4b 








47 


46 










13 






























35 


41 










14 










































15 


• ■ 












138 




24 




127 




165 


14^ 


228 


221 


141 


147 


12] 


137 


16 


4 


is 








23 


106 








90 




32 


36 


129 


114 


87 


92 






1 7 

It 






























175 


161 


175 


161 


175 


161 


18 


'7 


24 








39 


108 








194 




9 


35 


213 


211 


145 


137 








00 


117 






54 


287 


1,285 








1,244 




407 


572 


2,122 


1,983 


1,604 


1,541 


937 


878 




24 


51 






51 


91 


331 








335 




212 


332 


630 


591 


237 


224 


247 


214 


01 


6 


13 








105 










75 




29 


19 


204 


208 


140 


140 


55 


50 




• • 








3 


25 


89 








67 








70 


75 


93 


77 






Li 


9 


2i 








26 


189 








173 




si 


63 


252 


224 


189 


209 


137 


150 


24 


1 


16 










163 








126 




58 


86 


177 


171 


165 


186 






25 


4 


16 








40 


70 








88 




28 


33 


141 


124 


132 


115 


70 


74 


26 














223 








216 








401 


366 


401 


366 


401 


366 


ill 














87 








74 








87 


74 


87 


74 






00 














133 








90 




29 


39 


160 


150 


160 


150 


27 


24 


1 


15 


31 


19 


20 


135 


216 


347 








478 


237 


161 


309 


732 


626 


778 


828 


335 


216 


Q > 
O I 






7 


7 


25 


56 










46 


47 


9 


29 


120 


91 


89 


105 






3i 




5 


7 


6 


53 


41 










102 


49 


33 


81 


144 


154 


181 


258 


32 




3 




2 






16 


66 










40 


43 






112 


70 


99 


79 






Q 
O 


A 

% 


11 


5 


'7 


41 


53 


347 








242 


73 


77 


140 


284 


238 


337 


313 


257 


215 


3 . 


11 


13 


















48 


25 


42 


59 


72 


73 


72 


73 


46 




oO 




73 






161 


211 


1,255 




36 




1,273 


93 


149 


496 


1,670 


1,616 


1,301 


1,481 


714 


813 


OD 


11 


13 










135 








145 




68 


83 


256 


237 


165 


179 


71 


60 


37 


22 


42 






81 


60 


588 








580 


40 


24 


229 


634 


578 


459 


504 


457 


470 


38 


6 


18 






80 


151 


167 








210 




19 


113 


359 


373 


280 


356 


105 


201 
















169 




36 




188 




30 


54 


192 


196 


181 


216 


50 


53 


An 














110 








54 


53 






143 


136 


130 


130 


31 


29 


41 














86 








96 




8 


i7 


86 


96 


86 


96 






42 


15 


15 






58 


195 


411 


38 






384 


101 


123 


193 


856 


856 


760 


827 


259 


272 


43 














94 








111 




3 


2 


169 


190 


155 


182 


53 


47 


44 


5 


'7 










114 








105 




56 


71 


217 


210 


181 


199 


137 


119 


40 


ID 


8 








64 


74 








42 


44 


18 


23 


154 


154 


124 


147 




37 


10 










58 


46 










90 




g 


40 


138 


134 


127 


133 


69 


69 


47 












85 


129 


38 






36 


57 


37 


57 


178 


168 


173 


166 






40 






4 


16 


14 


54 


345 








223 


95 


66 


121 


533 


485 


436 


419 


118 


107 


49 














46 








25 


16 


10 


21 


55 


55 


38 


42 


33 


25 


KA 

ou 






4 


ie 




32 


134 








93 




26 


60 


216 


186 


154 


136 


44 


42 


51 














86 








41 


is 


30 


40 


88 


67 


70 


64 






52 






























23 


20 


23 


20 


io 


li 


53 










i4 


22 


79 








64 


64 






151 


157 


151 


157 


31 


29 


54 


159 


255 


260 


269 


92 


206 


3,745 


259 


297 




2,952 


278 


568 


1,295 


4,626 


4,473 


2,434 


2,999 


1,283 


1,685 


55 


62 


114 


142 


158 




390 


51 


43 




139 


54 


175 


292' 


536 


504 


125 


183 


40 


86 


56 


48 


56 


105 


90 






473 


75 


129 




234 


46 


171 


45S 


566 


419 


131 


191 


69 


180 


67 


10 


14 






35 


43 


73 








89 




13 


27 


130 


116 


71 


121 






58 






ii 


's 






296 


i7 


125 




233 


43 


37 


153 


415 


341 


287 


322 


245 


208 


59 


ii 


•ii 




13 




52, 


163 


111 








65 


50 


79 


200 


202 


142 


130 






60 


21 1 


17 








39 


232 








183 




92 


157 


290 


316 


200 


194 


96 


lei 


61 


1 








40 


23 


109 








91 


i9 


20 


46 


131 


139 




86 




36 


62 














356 








412 








566 


636 


557 


584 


193 


250 


63 














171 








188 








171 


203 


118 


172 


154 


163 


64 














397 


5 






375 








422 


424 


206 


348 


86 


102 


65 














405 








358 








438 


400 


52 


211 


66 


134 


66 














203 








187 








261 


253 


187 


194 


169 


186 


67 














226 








208 








232 


208 


99 


96 


116 


105 


68 


6 


26 








49 


103 








25 


5i 


io 


83 


108 


114 


65 


35 


18 


35 


69 










i7 




148 








230 








160 


198 


117 


132 


31 


39 



234 Eighty-Sixth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates, Each 



County 
Name of High School 



Total 
Enrollment 



Core 



English 



Social 
Studies 



Science 



Mathe- 
matics 



B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


6,73516,769 


4,248 


4,153 


2,484 


2,615 


2,229 


2,455 


3,867 


3 ,559 


5,409 


4,714 


209 


200 


77" 

77<| 


864 






776 


864 


670 


780 


581 


473 


522 


215 


102 


100 


835 1 


665 


2i6 


205 


623 


459 


593 


427 


467 


422 


396 


299 


30 


29 


219 


253 


130j 


145 


89 


108 


88 


105 


127 


153 


185 


164 


5 


5 


712 


736 


356! 


326 


356 


410 


332 


382 


382' 


311 


541 


400 


41 


39 


199 


175 


123| 


100 


76 


75 


70 


75 


92 


66 


180 


115 






271 


278 


177j 


161 


94 


117 


93 


117 


260 


245 


229 


185 






221 


210 


1441 


127 


77 


83 


77 


83 


206 


172 


152 


134 






372 


358 


237 


202 


135 


156 


120 


143 


158 


140 


286 


235 


3i 


27 


503 


452 


503 


452 










503 


452 


503 


452 






475 


482 


475; 


482' 










142 


149 


475 


482 






405 


387 


405' 


387 










142 


116 


405 


387 






410 


371 


410 


371 










395 


365 


395 


365 






450 


431 


450 


431 










121 


115 


450 


431 






242 


353 


150 


216 


92 


137 


67 


137 


107 


149 


187 


266 






526 


615 


360 


409 


166 


206 


119 


206 


104 


128 


385 


445 






49 


49 


49 


49 










11 


13 


49 


49 






69 


90 




90 










69 


90 


69 


90 






607 


616 


167 


146 


440 


470 


439 


470 


537 


517 


508 


509 






147 


133 






147 


133 


147 


133 


132 


93 


110 


90 






216 


213 


57 


42 


159 


171 


158 


171 


180 


174 


170 


182 






92 


103 






92 


103 


92 


103 


87 


83 


76 


70 






152 


167 


lio 


104 


42 


63 


42 


63 


138 


167 


152 


167 






581 


589 


231 


201 


350 


388 


350 


388 


457 


405 


517 


468 


20 


38 


183 


170 


118 


92 


65 


78 


65 


78 


149 


122 


159 


126 


5 


8 


248 


233 


42 


27 


206 


206 


206 


206 


211 


182 


208 


156 


15 


30 


108 


140 


71 


82 


37 


58 


37 


58 


55 


55 


108 


140 






42 


46 






42 


46 


42 


46 


42 


46 


42 


46 






763 


732 


443 


403 


320 


329 


336 


317 


706 


629 


692 


621 


19 


22 


151 


151 


95 


72 


56 


79 


82 


79 


149 


109 


115 


102 






56 


70 


41 


47 


15 


23 


5 


11 


55 


63 


53 


62 






189 


175 


109 


108 


80 


67 


80 


67 


162 


146 


162 


126 


i9 


22 


45 


27 


22 


15 


23 


12 


23 


12 


45 


27 


40 


22 






15 


10 






15 


10 


15 


10 






15 


10 






200 


196 


122 


121 


78 


75 


78 


75 


188 


isi 


200 


196 






107 


103 


54 


40 


53 


63 


53 


63 


107 


103 


107 


103 






679 


700 


329 


337 


349 


363 


342 


340 


583 


569 


550 


526 


26 


35 


284 


335 


166 


175 


117 


160 


110 


137 


219 


239 


253 


247 


21 


31 


148 


129 






148 


129 


148 


129 


148 


114 


97 


93 


5 


4 


42 


48 


29 


30 


13 


18 


13 


18 


34 


40 


29 


30 






205 


188 


134 


132 


71 


56 


71 


56 


182 


176 


171 


156 






3,137 


3,142 


824 


819 


2,311 


2 ,323 


1,994 


2.164 2,515 


2,249 


2,399 


2,348 


68 


205 


671 


702 






671 


702 


441 


562 


464! 385 


2071 185 


27 


68 


245^ 244 


157 


133 


88 


111 


78 


105 


206 


185 


177 


167 


6 


16 


239 


217 


146 


120 


91 


97 


91 


95 


213 


189 


169 


151 






161 


200 


36 


38 


125 


162 


122 


162 


152 


180 


137 


159 






482 


428 






482 


428 


418 


418 


414 


333 


420 


399 


i7 


39 


183 


201 


109 


126 


74 


81 


64 


80 


148 


164 


129 


137 






48 


37 


40 


31 


8 


6 


8 


6 


48 


37 


48 


37 




33 


374 


368 






374 


368 


374 


368 


372 


335 


374 


368 


2 


374 


338 






374 


338 


374 


338 


361 


311 


378 


338 13 


27 


302 


339 


302 


339 










104 


86 


302 


1 339 


3 


22 


58 


68 


34 


38 


24 


30 


24 


30 


33 


44 


58 


68 






917 


1.051 






914 


1,050 
60 


821 


947 


783 


848 


720 


749 


110 


150 


59 


61 






59 


59 


61 


54 


55 


51 


50 






42 


46 






42 


46 


42 


46 


42 


46 


42 


46 




112 


560 


630 






557 


630 


480 


527 


443 


455 


412 


396 


89 


26 


33 






26 


33 


26 


33 


20 


18 


8 


9 






230 


281 






230 


281 


214 


280 


224 


274 


207 


248 


21 


38 


837 


894 


570 


551 


267 


343 


267 


343 


612 


690 


645 


657 


14 


20 


118 


131 


78 


69 


40 


62 


40 


62 


85 


101 


96 


88 


6 


10 


156 


164 


102 


100 


54 


64 


54 


64 


102 


119 


111 


115 


8 


10 


198 


223 


136 


132 


62 


91 


62 


91 


90 


130 


143 151 






71 


64 


40 


38 


31 


26 


31 


26 


63 


55 


50| 41 






175 


194 


95 


94 


8C 


IOC 


8C 


100 


153 


167 


12€ 


144 






46 


4S 


46 


45 










46 


45 


4€ 


45 






73 


73 


73 

II 


73 










73 


73 

1 


72 


73 







Prince George's 

Northwestern Sr 

Bladensburg Sr.-Jr 

Sasscer Sr.-Jr 

Suitland Sr.-Jr 

Surrattsville Sr.-Jr 

Laurel Sr.-Jr 

Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr 

Oxon Hill Sr.-Jr 

Bladensburg Jr 

Hyattsville Jr 

Mt. Rainier Jr 

Maryland Park Jr 

Greenbelt Jr 

Douglass Colored Sr.-Jr 

Fairmont Hghts. Col. Sr.-Jr. 

Westwood Colored Jr 

Lakeland Colored Jr 



QcsKN Anne's 

Sudlersvile Sr.-Jr 

Centreville Sr.-Jr 

Stevensville Sr.-Jr 

Kennard Colored Sr.-Jr. 



24 St. Mary's 

25 Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 

26 Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

27 Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr. . 

28 Jarboesville Colored Sr.-Jr. 



29 Somerset 

30 Washington Sr.-Jr 

31 Marion Sr.-Jr 

32 Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

33 Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

34 Ewell Jr 

35 Greenwood Colored Sr.-Jr. 

36 Woodson Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 



37 Talbot 

38 Easton Sr.-Jr 

39 St. Michaels Sr.-Jr. . . 

40 Cordova Sr.-Jr 

41 Moton Colored Sr.-Jr. . 



Washington 

Hagerstown Sr 

WiUiamsport Sr.-Jr 

Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

Hancock Sr.-Jr 

Boonsboro Sr.-Jr 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

MaugansviUe Sr.-Jr 

South Potomac Jr 

Woodland Way Jr 

Washington Street Jr 

North Street Colored Sr.-Jr. 



Wicomico 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

Wicomico Sr.-Jr 

Hebron Sr.-.lr 

Salisbury Colored Sr.-Jr. 



Worcester 

Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Buckingham Sr.-Jr 

Ocean City Sr.-Jr 

Worcester Colored Sr.-Jr. 
Stephen Loup Colored Jr. 
Berlin Colored Jr 



* Incudes the I'ollowiiic iiunibor 
Sr.-Jr.— 9; Frrdcrick, KiiiiiiitsliurL' 

t Includes the lollowiim 
Sr.-Jr.— 1; Montgomery, Slierwood 



if tjirls taking General .\grieult<ire: Baltimore, Franklin Sr.-Jr.— 15; Caroline, Caroline 
r -.Ir 1 ; (^icen .•\iine's, Kennard Colored Sr.-Jr.— 32. 

,! mrl- i.ikint: N ocatumal .VirrK iilture: Carroll, Mt Airy Sr.-Jr.— 1 ; Frederick, rhurinont 
Sr.-.lr.— 1; Worcester, Buckingham Sr.-Jr.— 4. 



Maryland State Department of Education 235 



Maryland County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1952 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


1 Music 


Art- Arts 
and Crafta 


♦ 

Gen. 


t 

Voc. 


Arts 


f 

Edu. 


Gen. 


a 
Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


R 
13 


D 


B 


G 


r> 
D 


B 


G 


p 
\j 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


139 


175 


258 


204 


150 


166 


4 ,740 


173 


469 


14 


4 ,185 


567 


1 

89212,511 


5,722 


5,520 


4 ,287 


4,607 


3,199 


3,119 


2 


45 


74 


91 


83 






'371 


17 


36 


14 


194 


146 


181 


533 


563 


441 


' 97 


'203 


' 59 


82 


3 


22 


26 


92 


63 






296 


40 


290 




232 


76 


300 


836 


208 


196 


140 


167 


163 


119 


4 












64 


131 








178 




55. 96 


219 


240 


131 


221 


73 


59 


5 


22 


2i 


28 


11 






522 


lie 






275 


84 


133 


428 


605 


561 


493 


530 


403 


359 


6 


27 


20 










170 








100 


33 


28 


62 


195 


144 


127 


117 








15 


20 


i9 


10 






134 








135 




58 


102 


270 


263 


253 


275 






8 






9 


g 




55 


156 








127 


23 


23 


74 


219 


205 


162 


145 


59 


47 


9 














303 








198 


54 


83 


131 


354 


297 


208 


206 


182 


163 


10 














503 








452 








503 


452 


503 


452 


503 


452 


11 














475 








477 








451 


442 


383 


371 


290 


300 


12 














405 








387 








405 


387 


405 


387 


405 


387 


13 














395 








365 








398 


363 


327 


355 


190 


139 


14 














450 








431 








450 


431 


392 


389 


387 


358 


15 




i4 






150 


47 










134 


78 


io 


lis 


242 


344 


173 


221 


59 


173 


16 






i9 


28 






360 




167 




410 


73 


21 


136 


522 


615 


375 


429 


377 


432 


17 






























49 


49 


49 


49 


49 


49 


18 














69 








96 








69 


90 


69 


90 






19 


24 


36 


13 


19 


149 


58 


508 








338 


115 


56 


179 


588 


573 


368 


382 


99 


79 


on 


3 


4 






17 




125 








106 




30 


95 


146 


122 


117 


101 






21 


16 


28 


i3 


i9 




58 


164 








99 


23 


5 


43 


198 


189 


99 


114 


99 


79 


22 


5 


4 










67 








58 




21 


41 


92 


95 










23 










132 




152 








75 


92 






152 


167 


153 


167 






24 


1 n 
12 


3 






135 


88 


29 








285 


118 


39 


133 


525 


494 


421 


421 


13 


17 


25 










109 


39 










135 




20 


75 


189 


168 


132 


119 






26 


12 


3 


















82 


56 


14 


51 


228 


186 


181 


162 






27 










26 


49 










51 


50 


5 


7 


108 


140 


108 


140 






28 














29 








17 


12 














13 


17 


on 


14 


25 






29 


24 


310 


3 






494 


39 


132 


166 


522 


530 


457 


453 


61 


49 


30 


14 


17 






29 


24 










84 




19 


37 


145 


151 










31 




8 






















25 


33 


55 


70 


29 


33 






32 






















150 




88 


96 






155 


150 


39 


34 


33 


































22 


15 


22 


15 


34 






























15 


io 










OK 














203 


3 






196 








200 


196 


144 


152 






00 














107 








64 


39 






107 


103 


107 


103 






37 


28 


32 






37 


106 


443 


2 






478 


56 


47 


188 


569 


521 


518 


513 


107 


106 


38 


12 


14 








36 


188 








204 




33 


111 


201 


195 


167 


181 






39 


6 


8 








19 


129 


2 






114 




14 


77 


121 


90 


116 


106 


107 


106 


An 












24 










28 








42 


48 


42 


48 






41 


10 


10 






37 


27 


126 








132 


56 






205 


188 


193 


178 






AO 

4J 


69 


134 


56 


94 


87 


339 


2,124 


40 


244 


40 


2,136 


232 


235 


771 


3,064 


3 105 


2,440 


2,585 


952 


939 


43 


25 


31 


56 


94 




57 


174 


2 


244 




235 


49 


80 


429 


640 


'700 


190 


279 


76 


54 


44 


5 


10 








53 


164 








150 




35 


72 


230 


219 


202 


205 






45 


6 


26 






37 


32 


107 








122 


21 


74 


87 


238 


217 


177 


196 


58 


43 


46 


1 


18 








30 


115 








133 


39 






161 


199 


161 


200 






47 


23 


29 








101 


270 








298 


53 


30 


128 


458 


428 


457 


412 






48 


8 


13 






20 


48 


138 


38 






56 


70 


10 


KK 


183 


192 


171 


193 






49 










30 


18 


48 








37 








48 


37 










50 














374 








368 








374 


368 


374 


368 


340 


343 


51 














374 








338 








372 


338 


374 


338 


2341 218 


52 














302 








331 








302 


339 


2761 326 


210 


243 


53 


i 












58 








68 








58 


68 


58 


68 


34 


38 


54 


1 


6 


19 


39 




126 


707 








631 




87 


249 


508 


618 


579 


667 


245 


252 


55 


1 


6 










59 








61 












53 


50 


53 


50 


56 














42 








46 












42 


46 


42 


46 


57 






i9 


39 




77 


379 








327 




81 


229 


349 


406 


327 


403 


124 


123 


58 


































26 


33 


26 


33 


59 












49 


227 








197 




6 


26 


159 


212 


131 


135 






60 


5 


13 








156 


385 


10 


4 




438 


50 


204 


263 


786 


802 


646 


732 


190 


192 


61 














91 








82 




32 


48 


117 


123 


100 


125 






62 












27 


121 








139 




36 


48 


152 


150 


110 


122 






63 


5 


i:i 








46 


116 




"4 




136 




56 


80 


159 


162 


142 


173 


56 


55 


64 














57 


10 






61 




31 


37 


64 


55 










65 












S3 










30 


56 


4P 


50 


175 


194 


175 


194 


61 


64 


66 






























46 


45 


46 


45 






67 
















" 














73 


73 


73 


73 


T3 


1 



X Includes the followiiiij nuinher of girls and boys taking Diversified Occupations: Baltimore, Kenwood Sr.-Jr. — 18 bovs, 7 
girls; Dorchester, Cambridge t^r.-Jr.— 24 boys; Montgomery, Hethesda-C'hevy Chase 8r.— 35 boys, 8 girls; Montgomery Blair 5?r. — 
4:} boys. 32 girls; Richard .Montgomery. 9 boys. 11 girls; Prince George's, .Northwestern Sr.— 21 boys, 15 girls; .Suitlanil Sr.-Jr.— 20 
boys. I'i girls; Worcester, Buckingham Sr.-Jr. — 4 boys. 

° Includes 4 girls taking Industrial Education at Prince George's, Bladensburg Sr.-Jr 

'1 Includes 7 boys taking Vocational Home Economics at Anne Arundel, Bates Colored Sr.-Jr.; and 24 boys taking Cafeteria 
Trades at Priiice George's, Northwestern Sr. 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 224-229 
Accreditation and certification, 35-38 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 146-147 
Expenditure, 220 
Per cent for, 144-145 
Superintendents, 2, 5-7, 211, 216 
Adult education, 134-136, 154, 157-158, 218 
Age-grade distribution, 69-72 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 134-135 
Enrollment, 80-81, 91 

Each high school, 230-235 
Failures and withdrawals, 101 
Federal aid, 154-156, 158 
Schools offering, 102, 230-235 
State supervision, 2 
Teachers, 102 
Aid from State and /or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution by- 
type of fund: 

1951-1952, 142-143, 194, 216-217 

1923-1952, 140-141 
State teachers colleges, 182-183, 194, 196 
Vocational education, 154-158, 194, 213 
Vocational rehabilitation, 139, 194 
Appropriations 
County 

1951-1952, 142-143, 167-169, 194, 214 
1923-1952, 140-141 
State 

1951-1952, 142-143, 194, 212 
Art, high school 

i^nrollment, 80-81, 92 

Each high school, 230-235 

Schools ottering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 
Assessable basis, 171-173 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 208 

Average daily, 207 

Each high school, 224-229 

Index of elementary school, 62 

Per cent of, 60-63, 209 

Summer school pupils, 136 

Teachers at summer school, 108 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 57 
Auxiliarj' agencies 

Cost per pupil for, 148-151 

Expenditures for, 218, 220-223 

Per cent of current expense budget, 144-145 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 94 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 194, 212 
Belonging, average number, 206 

Each high school, 224-229 

Per teacher, 123-124 
Birth rates, 58-59 

Board of Education, State, 2, 194-195 
Boards of Education, County, 5-7 
Bonds outstanding, school, 164 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 148, 150 
High, 149, 151 
Expenditures 
All schools, 217 
Elementary, 220, 222 
High, 221, 223 
Per cent of current expense budget, 144-145 
Boys and girls 

Age-grade distribution, 69-72 
Enrollment 
By grade, 63 
Total 

Nonpublic, 200-205 
Public, 198-199 



B— (Continued) 

Graduates, high school, 73-79, 224-229 
Budget (s) 

Baltimore City, county, local 
1951-1952, 142-143, 167-169, 215 
1923-1952, 140-141 

State public school, 194 

State teachers college, 194, 196 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 129-133, 197 

Value of school, per pupil, 165-166 
Business education 

Adult, 134-136 

EnroUment, 80-81, 89, 93, 154-156, 158 

Each high school, 230-235 
Failures and withdrawals, 100 
Schools offering, 102, 230-235 
Teachers, 102 

c 

Capital outlay, school 

By site, building, equipment, 219 

By type of school, 148-151, 163, 220-223 

By year, 1923-1952, 147 

Certificates held by county teachers, 109-113 

Certification and accreditation, 35-38 

Classes 

Evening school, 134-136, 218 

Size of, 123-124 

Special for handicapped, 55-56 

Summer school, Baltimore City, 142 
Clerks, county schools, 104, 211 
Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1951 entering, 75-79 

of 1952 entering State teachers colleges, 74. 
224-229 

Junior, 178, 180-181 

State teachers, 4, 176-183, 191-194, 196 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland coun- 
ties, 106-107 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 128 

Transportation of pupils, 158-162 
Construction accounts, State Teachers colleges 

191-193 
Core program 

Enrollment, 80-81 

Each high school, 230-235 

Schools offering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for elementary and high, 148-151 

By type of school, 147 

General control, 146-147 

Individual high schools, 224-229 

State teachers colleges, 182 

Transported, 158, 161 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 5-7 
Courses in individual high schools, 224-229 
Crippled children, services for, 55-56, 188-189 
Current expenses 

Costs per pupil, 146-151 

Individual high schools, 224-229 
Expenditures 
All schools, 215 

By source of funds, 142-143 
By type of school, 220-223 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 49 
Days in session, 49, 209 
Debt service 

1951-1952, 165, 167-169, 219 

Tax rate for, 170 
Dental program, 190 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 



236 



Index 



237 



D — (Continued) 

Distributive education, 154-156, 158 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 95 

Schools offering, 102 

Teachers, 102 



E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 103, 211 
Employment of high school graduates, 74-79 
English, high school 
Enrollment, 80-81, 83 

Each high school, 230-235 
Failures and withdrawals, 100-101 
Schools offering, 102, 230-235 
Teachers, 102 
Enrollment 

Adult, 134, 136 

Atypical children, 57 

Elementary, 50, 52-54, 63-65, 198-205 

Grade or year, 63-65 

High school 

Course, each school, 224-229 

Growth in, 152-153 

Subjects, 80-81, 83-93, 95 

Each school, 230-235 
Year, 63-65, 82 

Each school, 224-229 
Increase in, 51-54 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 50, 52-54, 

200-205 
Public, 50-54, 63-65, 198-199 
State teachers colleges, 178-180 
Subject, high school, 80-81, 83-93, 95 

Each high school, 230-235 
Summary, 50-54 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 136 
Equalization fund, 142-143, 212 
Equivalence examinations, 137 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 134, 136 
Expenditures, 154, 157-158, 218 
Expenditures, 215-223 

(see also General control. Instruction, Opera- 
tion, Maintenance, Auxiliary agencies, Fixed 
charges. Payments to adjoining counties. 
Current expenses. Debt service. Capital out- 
lay) 

Elementary schools, 220, 222 

Evening schools, 154, 157-158, 218 

Health, 218 

High schools. 221, 223 

Libraries, 218 

Rehabilitation, 45-48 

Salaries 

All schools, 217 

Elementary, 220, 222 

High, 152-153, 221, 223 

Vocational, 154-158 
State teachers colleges, 182-183, 194, 196 
Total, by major classifications, 194, 215 
Transportation, 158, 160-161, 218 
Vocational, Federal, 154-158, 213 



P 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 154-158, 194, 213 
Administration and supervision, 158 
Salaries of teachers, 154-157 
Baltimore City, 154-156 
County, day, 154-156 
County, evening, 154, 157 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 182-183, 194. 196 
Financial statements 

County schools. 212-223 
State public schools, 194 
State teachers colleges, 191-194, 196 
Financial statements and summary tables. 191-235 
First grade nonpromotions, 68 



F— (Continued) 

Fixed charges, 144-145, 218 
French 

Enrollment, 80-81, 90 

Each high school, 230-235 

Failures and withdrawals, 100 

Schools offering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 



G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 146-147 

Expenditures, 216 

Per cent for, 144-145 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 94 
Grade enrollment, 63-65, 82 
Graduates 

High school, 73-79 

Entering State teachers colleges, 74, 75-76. 
78-79 

From each school, 224-229 
Occupations of, 74-79 
State teachers colleges, 176-177 
Guidance, teachers of, 102 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 55, 194 

Home instruction, 55, 198-199 

Hospital schools, 55, 198-199 

Institutions for, 55, 57 

Opportunities for education of, 55-57 

Receipts from State for, 55, 194, 212 

Transportation of, 55 
Health 

Activities of State and county departments, 
188-190 

Expenditures, all schools, 218 
Hearing, conservation of, 55-57 
High school equivalence examinations, 137 
High schools 

Aid for, 212 

Disbursements, 221, 223 

Individual, 224-229 

Supervision, 103, 211 
Home economics 

Adult, 134-136, 154, 158 

Enrollment, 80-81, 91 

Each high school, 230-235 

Federal aid, 154-158 

Schools offering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 
Home instruction of pupils, 55, 198-199 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 55, 198-199 



I 

Immunizations, 188 

Income payments, per capita, 175 

Income tax, per capita, 174 

Incorporated towns, levy for, 168-169 

Index of school attendance, 62 

Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 

Instruction, division of, 19-28 

Cost per pupil, 148-151 

Expenditures, 220-223 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 217 
State teachers colleges, 182-183 

Per cent of current expense budget, 142-143 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 183 

J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 104 
Junior colleges, 178. 180-181 

K 

Kindergartens, 63-65 



238 



Index 



L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Late entrants, elementary, 62 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 10 

Length of session, 49, 209 

Letter of transmittal, 9 

Levies, county, 167-169 

Librarians, county, 3-4 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 186-187, 217 

Public, 3-4, 186 

School, 187 
Library extension, 3, 39-44, 185-187, 194 
Lip reading classes, 56, 136 9* 
Lunch program, school, 213, 218 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 148-151 

Expenditures, 218, 220-223 

Per cent of current expense budget, 144-145 
Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 80-81, 88-89 
Each high school, 230-235 

Failures and withdrawals, 100-101 

Schools offering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 188 

Teachers, 194 
Men teachers, 106, 210-211 
Mentally handicapped children, 56 
Minutes, State Board, 11-18 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 80-81, 92 

Each high school, 230-235 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 94 

Schools offering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 



N 

Night schools (see Eveningjschools, Adult educa- 
tion) 
Nonpromotions 
Elementary, 66-68 
First grade, 68 
Subject, high schools, 96-101 
Each subject, 100-101 
One or more subjects, 96-99 
Number belonging, 206 
Each high school, 224-229 
Per teacher, 123-124 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 57 
Having one teacher, 128, 197 
Nonpublic, 50, 200-205 
Public, 50, 197 

Elementary. 128-130, 197 
High, 131-133, 197 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 74-79 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 128 

Number belonging in, 128 
Per teacher. 123 

Number of, 128, 197 

Per cent of attendance in, 61 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 148-151 

Expenditures. 217, 220-223 

Per cent of current expensejbudget, 144-145 
Orchestras, banns, glee clubs, 94 
Over-age pupils, 69-72 



P 

Parent-teacher associations, 105 

Parochial and private schools, 50, 52-54, 200-205 

Part-payment of salaries, 212 

Payrnents to adjoining counties, 144-145, 219 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Physical education and health, 188-190, 218 

Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 194 

Enrollment, 86-87, 92 

Each high school, 230-235 

Schools offering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 
Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 55-56 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 4 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 211 
Private and parochial schools, 50, 52-54, 200-205 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 171-172 

School, 165-166 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-7 

Supervisors of, 103, 211 
Salaries, 216 
Pupils 

Atvpical, 57 

Nonpublic, 50, 52-54, 200-205 
One-teacher schools, 128 
Over-age, 69-72 
Per teacher, 123-124 
Public school 

Enrollment, 50-54, 198-199 

Number attending, 207 

Number belonging, 206 

Per cent of attendance, 60-63, 209 
Transported, 158-159 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 214 

Federal government, 213 

Evening schools, counties, 157 
Teachers' salaries, counties, 154-158 
Vocational education, 154-158 

State, 212 

Distributed by type of fund, 140-141, 194, 212 

Evening schools, counties, 157 

Total and per cent, 140-141 

Teachers colleges, 182-183, 194, 196 
Rehabilitation, Vocational, 2-3, 45-48, 138-139, 194 
Repair, utility men, janitors, 104 
Resignations, teachers, 114-116 
Retarded children, program for, 55-57 
Retirement system for teachers, 4, 184, 194 



s 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 152-153 
Per cent of school budget, 144-145 
Superintendents, 216 
Supervisors, 217 

Pupil personnel, 216 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 124-127 

Cost per pupil, 148-151 
Total 

Elementary, 220, 222 

High, 152-153, 221, 223 

Vocational, 154-158 
School lunch program, 218 
Schools 

For atvpical children, 57 
Number of. 50, 128-133, 197 
Science, high school 
Enrollment, 80-81, 86-87 

Each high school, 230-235 
Failures and withdrawals, 100-101 
Schools offering, 102, 230-235 
Teachers, 102 



Index 



239 



S— (Continued) 

Session, length of, 49, 209 
Sex of teachers, 106, 210-211 
Sight conservation classes, 56 
Size of 

Classes, 123-124 
Schools 

Each high school, 224-229 
Elementary, 128-130 
High, 131-133 
Teaching staff, 50, 128-129, 131, 133, 210-211 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 80-81, 84-85 

Each high school, 230-235 
Failures and withdrawals, 100-101 
Schools ofTering, 102, 230-235 
Teachers, 102 
Source of new teachers, 122 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 55-57, 194 

Special high school teachers, 102 

State 

Aid to schools 

1923-1952, 140-141 

Showing various funds, 194, 212 

Board of Education, 2, 194 
Excerpts from minutes, 11-18 

Department of Education, 2-3 

Department of Health, school activities, 188-190 

Income taxes, 174 

Public school budget, 194-195 

Teachers colleges, 4, 74-76, 78-79, 176-180, 
182-183, 194, 196, 224-229 

Teachers' retirement system, 4, 184, 194 
Statistical tables and financial statements, 191-235 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Business 

education) 
Subjects studies in high schools, 80-95 

Each high school, 230-235 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 108 

Pupils, 136 
Superintendents, 3, 5-7, 211 
Supervision, supervisors 

Cost per pupil, 148-151 

Cost, salaries, expenses, 217 
By type of school, 220-223 

Names of, 2-3, 5-7 

Number of, 103, 211 

Per cent of current expense budget, 144-145 
Salaries of, 217, 220-223 
State, 2-3 



T 

Taxable basis, 171-173 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 144-145 

Tax rates, county, 170 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 102 

Average salary, 124-127 

Certification, 35-38, 109-113 

Colleges, 4, 74-76, 78-79, 176-180, 182-183. 194, 

196, 224-229 
Growth in number, 152-153 
Number of, 210-211 

For each high school subject, 102 

In each high school, 224-229 

In schools of each type 



T— (Continued) 

Atypical, 57 

Nonpublic, 50, 200-205 

Public, 50, 210-211 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 136 
Of atypical children, 57 
Pupils per, 123-124 
Resignations, 114-116 
Salaries 

Average, 124-127 
Growth in high school, 152-153 
Sex of, 106, 210-211 
Source of, new to counties, 122 
Special subjects, high schools, 102 
Summary, elementary and high, public and non- 
public, 50 
Summer school attendance, 108 
Training institutions, 176-180, 182-183, 194, 196 
Turnover of, 114-121 
Withdrawals by subject taught, 116 
Teachers' retirement system 
Financial statements, 184, 194 
Staflf, 4 

Teachers' contributions to, 184 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 134-136, 154, 157 

Enrollment, 80-81, 91, 155-156 
Each high school, 230-235 

Federal aid, 154-158 

Schools ofTering, 102, 230-235 

Teachers, 102 
Training centers. State teachers colleges, 178-179 
Transmittal, letter of, 9 
Transportation of pupils, 158-162, 218 

Cost, total and per pupil, 158, 160-161, 218 

Per cent transported, 158-159 

Physically handicapped, 55 
Tuition charges. State teachers colleges, 182-183 
Turnover in teaching stafT, 114-121 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 17 1-1'/ 3 

School property, 165-166 
Vocational education, 29-34, 154-158, 194, 213 

Enrollment 

Day schools, 80-81, 91, 155-156, 230-235 
Evening schools, 134-136, 157 

Federal aid, 154-158, 194, 213 

State aid, 194 
Vocational guidance, 102, 158 
Vocational rehabilitation, 2-3, 45-48, 138-139, 194 



w 

War emergency certificates, 109-113 
Wealth back of each pupil, 173 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 62 

High, 100-101 
Withdrawals of teachers, 114-115 

By subjects taught, 116 



Y 

Year, length of school, 49, 209 



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